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Crafty_Dog
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« on: December 05, 2010, 11:22:17 AM »

This is from the NY Times (for which my nickname is Pravda On The Hudson: POTH) so caveat lector:
==============

PHOENIX — Arizona used to be a knife carrier’s nightmare, with a patchwork of local laws that forced those inclined to strap Buck knives or other sharp objects to their belts to tread carefully as they moved from Phoenix (no knives except pocketknives) to Tempe (no knives at all) to Tucson (no knives on library grounds).

D’Alton Holder, a longtime knife maker, said, “It’s ridiculous to talk about the size of the knife as if that makes a difference.”
But that changed earlier this year when Arizona made its Legislature the sole arbiter of knife regulations. And because of loose restrictions on weapons here, Arizona is now considered a knife carrier’s dream, a place where everything from a samurai sword to a switchblade can be carried without a quibble.

Arizona’s transformation, and the recent lifting of a ban on switchblades, stilettos, dirks and daggers in New Hampshire, has given new life to the knife rights lobby, the little-known cousin of the more politically potent gun rights movement. Its vision is a knife-friendly America, where blades are viewed not as ominous but as tools — the equivalent of sharp-edged screw drivers or hammers — that serve useful purposes and can save lives as well as take them.

Sure, knife fights and knife attacks are a concern. No knife-lover would ever deny that. In fact, Todd Rathner, the lobbyist for Knife Rights Inc., an advocacy group based in Arizona that is now in its third year, was mugged twice in New York City before moving to Tucson, once — “ironically,” he said — at knifepoint.

But the problem is with the knife wielder, not the knife itself, the knife lobby says, sounding very much like those who advocate for gun rights.

In fact, knife advocates contend that the Second Amendment applies to knives as well as guns. They focus their argument elsewhere, though, emphasizing that knives fill so many beneficial roles, from carving Thanksgiving turkeys to whittling, that they do not deserve the bad name they often get.

“People talk about how knives are dangerous, and then they go in the kitchen and they have 50 of them,” said D’Alton Holder, a veteran knife maker who lives in Wickenberg, Ariz. “It’s ridiculous to talk about the size of the knife as if that makes a difference. If you carry a machete that’s three feet long, it’s no more dangerous than any knife. You can do just as much damage with an inch-long blade, even a box cutter.”

As for the pocketknife he carries with him every day, Mr. Holder said: “I use it for everything — to clean my fingernails, to prune a tree or carve, even to eat dinner with. I never think about the knives that I carry or the knives that I make as weapons.”

Jennifer Coffey, the New Hampshire state representative who led the effort to overturn the state’s switchblade ban, is also an emergency medical technician who uses knives to extract people from vehicles after accidents. Even when switchblades were outlawed, there were exceptions for emergency workers and others who might use them on the job, but Ms. Coffey still considered the law outrageous.

“We had certain knives that were illegal, but I could walk down the street with a kitchen knife that I used to carve a turkey and that would be legal,” Ms. Coffey said. “I’d be more scared of a kitchen knife than a switchblade.”

She said switchblade bans were passed in the 1950s because of the menacing use of the knives in movies like “West Side Story” and “Rebel Without a Cause.” Her legislation drew the support of an array of knife-related entities: Knife Rights, a young upstart in knife advocacy; the American Knife and Tool Institute, a group based in Wyoming that represents knife manufacturers, sellers and owners; and publications like Blade, Cutlery News Journal and Knife World.

The effort to lift the ban on switchblades in New Hampshire even won the support of the New Hampshire Association of Chiefs of Police.

==========



In Arizona, however, police groups were more circumspect about lifting all of the local knife laws. The Arizona Association of Chiefs of Police opposed the move, saying local jurisdictions ought to set their own knife restrictions. The Phoenix Law Enforcement Association remained neutral.

In much of the country, especially in urban areas, knives are still viewed as weapons in need of tight control.
District Attorney Cyrus R. Vance Jr. of Manhattan announced in June that his office had pressured retail stores that were selling illegal knives to remove them from their shelves, forfeit profits from the knives made over the last four years and help finance a campaign to educate people against illegal knives.

“What makes these knives so dangerous is the ease with which they can be concealed and brandished,” Mr. Vance said of the illegal switchblades and gravity knives, which require a wrist flip to open instead of a switchblade’s spring, that were bought by undercover agents.

Mr. Vance’s offensive drew the ire of the American Knife and Tool Institute, which issued an “action alert” and offered to assist New York retailers and individuals charged with knife violations with their legal defenses.

The knife lobby similarly rose up in 2009 when the federal Customs and Border Protection agency issued a proposal that would have reclassified many pocketknives and pocket tools as switchblades and thus made them illegal for import or sale across state lines under the 1958 federal Switchblade Act. In the end, Congress intervened and blocked the change.

A case now unfolding in Seattle shows how volatile knives continue to be. A police officer there fatally shot a man in August after, the officer said, he ordered the man several times to drop a knife that he was carrying. But the legitimacy of the shooting has been questioned by the Police Department, partly because the knife, which had a three-inch blade, was found in a closed position near the body of the dead man, who had been using it to carve a piece of wood.

Knife advocates are hoping that, just as Arizona’s immigration law has led to a national debate on that topic, its move to end knife restrictions will lead more states to take up the cause.

“Arizona is now the model when it comes to knives,” said Mr. Rathner, who was a National Rifle Association lobbyist before he switched to knives. “We’re now going to be moving to other states, probably in the Rocky Mountains and the Southeast. There’s probably half a dozen or more places that are ripe for this.”

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G M
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« Reply #1 on: December 05, 2010, 01:16:23 PM »

Real badguys tend to carry box cutters, utility type knives. Depending on the jurisdiction, they are mostly legal to carry (depending on the jurisdiction), they are inexpensive, they can deliver serious cuts with little effort and can then be quickly disposed of if used in a crime. They don't tend to carry high dollar, quality knives, at least most don't.
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G M
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« Reply #2 on: December 06, 2010, 05:12:09 PM »

"A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed."

Notice it says "Arms", not "Guns".


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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #3 on: December 12, 2010, 09:11:16 PM »

http://knife-expert.com/ca.txt
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #4 on: November 14, 2012, 01:05:50 AM »




EDC: Changes to Your Knife Rights in 2012

By Will Grant

When the fathers of the United States framed the Constitution as supreme law of the country in 1787, they granted each American citizen the unalienable right to keep and bear arms. While that clause of the Second Amendment is generally thought of as referring to the legal right to own and carry a firearm, it was originally based on a citizen’s right to defend him or herself. And that includes the right to carry a knife.

The rights of citizens to carry knives hasn’t seen near the level of legal or media attention that firearm restrictions have seen, but that is changing. Knife Rights, founded in 2006, is an organization dedicated to lobbying for changes in legislation that it feels unnecessary, irrelevant or outdated. And to that end, it’s a target-rich environment.

“There are many states with irrational knife laws,” says Knife Rights Chairman Doug Ritter. “Our concentration is on states where we feel like we can make improvements and achieve successes, and as we continue to do this we want to show other states that this is possible with it having a negative effect on crime rate.”

Consider the switchblade. Thanks to Rebel Without a Cause, released in 1955, and West Side Story, produced on Broadway in 1957, the switchblade became a symbol of unruly youth, of warring gangsters—a knife with no practical purposes. A year later, on August 12, 1958, Congress passed a law banning switchblades, defined as any knife that opened automatically.

As the years passed, it became clear that switchblades did have practical applications—such as a first responder needing to a knife that could open quickly with one hand for, say, cutting a seatbelt. Today, switchblades remain illegal in 14 states. But the broad shift toward more pragmatic legislation is an encouraging trend.

This summer, Knife Rights successfully lobbied for the repeal of the law banning switchblades in Missouri. The organization filed for similar legislation in Pennsylvania, though election-centric politics diverted attention from the effort.

“We generally do not comment on pending legislative efforts,” says Ritter, “however, I can say that we will be pursuing the exact same bill next year and that the effort is already well underway.”

There is perhaps no more irrational case of enforcing a knife law than Clayton Baltzer’s arrest this past spring in New York City. Baltzer, 20, is an online student at Baptist Bible College & Seminary in Clarks Summit, Pennsylvania, majoring in camping-ministry. He works full time as the food service manager of a bible camp in Millersburg, Ohio. And he’s carried a pocketknife since his uncle gave him one when he was 11 years old.

In March, his fine arts class took a trip to New York to see the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Ground Zero at the World Trade Center site, Times Square and an opera at Lincoln Center. And as he usually does, Baltzer carried his knife, a small Winchester knife with a pocket clip and blade about an inch and a half long.

While he was standing on a subway platform, two undercover policemen noticed the clip outside Blatzer’s pocket.

“They grabbed me out of nowhere,” Baltzer says. “It ended up with me with my hands on my head. I have definitely never been in trouble like that, so I was pretty scared. I didn’t really know what was going on.”

The cops took Baltzer up to the ticketing platform where they called more cops. The knife Baltzer was carrying is intended to be opened with two hands, but the cops were looking for a knife that could be flicked open with one hand, or a gravity knife. The first cop could not flick the knife open, nor could the second. But the third successfully opened the knife with one hand, and the cops had their man—graivty kniver are illegal in New York.

They handcuffed Baltzer and booked him with disorderly conduct. He spent five hours in jail and they confiscated his knife, the one given to him by his uncle.

In subsequent months, he made several trips to New York to appear in court. He was ordered to pay the court fees and given three days’ worth of community service.

“I definitely do not feel like ever going back to New York,” Baltzer says. “Not any time soon.”

Baltzer has since completed his community service, paid his debt to society. And the city still has possession of his small folding knife. It’s prosecutions like these that Knife Rights stands to correct.

“(Baltzer) is a poster child for the unreasonableness and ridiculousness of the prosecution of honest citizens carrying knives,” Knife Rights’ Ritter told The Columbus Dispatch in June.

In 2011, prior to Baltzer’s absurd arrest, Knife Rights filed a federal civil rights lawsuit to stop New York City from arresting law-abiding citizens carrying common pocketknives and t prevent t persecution of businesses, like Home Depot and Ace Hardware, from selling pocketknives. The city and the District Attorney of New York, Cyrus Vance, Jr., moved to have the case dismissed earlier this year. But a US District Judge denied their motion and the case will proceed.

Much of the road to more practical knife legislation has been paved by the firearms-rights organizations, according to Ritter. In that regard, the knife community is following in the footsteps of the gun community. Every year, there are positive changes to knife regulations that take into consideration not only law-abiding citizens, but also professionals who use and carry knives on a regular basis.

The biggest change to knife laws this year was the knife law preemption bill signed in Georgia. That law effectively eliminated a complex and confusing patchwork of local knife laws in the state. Within the knife community, that’s very good news. Particularly because Atlanta, home to BLADE Show, the largest knife show in the world, it was illegal to carry any automatic knife or knife bigger than three inches “readily available for use.” The new law means that people traveling to or from the show will no longer have to worry about inadvertently violating local laws.

Also this year, Washington Governor Chris Gregoire signed legislation making assisted-opening knives, or switchblades, legal in the state.

Indiana also voted for more relaxed switchblade knife regulations.

In South Carolina, State Representative Mike Pitts introduced HB4609, which would add knives to the state’s existing firearms preemption law.

As said, Knife Rights does not comment on on-going legislative or lobbying efforts. But it’s safe to say that we can count on continued efforts to make knife laws more practical to those who use them. And, most importantly, without detrimental effects on crime rates.

To read more about the efforts of knife rights, click HERE.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #5 on: January 01, 2013, 04:30:01 PM »

http://www.inquisitr.com/463526/al-sharpton-knife-control-will-follow-gun-control-legislation-video/
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Dog Robertlk808
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« Reply #6 on: January 02, 2013, 02:28:54 PM »


Ah I see you have already posted something, well here is a follow up then.

Al Sharpton: Next Up, Knife Control
http://www.theblaze.com/stories/al-sharpton-next-up-knife-control/
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"You see, it's not the blood you spill that gets you what you want, it's the blood you share. Your family, your friendships, your community, these are the most valuable things a man can have." Before Dishonor - Hatebreed
G M
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« Reply #7 on: January 02, 2013, 04:11:19 PM »

I know one state dept. of Corrections had to ban Jolly Rancher candy, because the inmates figured out how to make shanks out of it. I'm told you could put a razor edge on them.
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sgtmac_46
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« Reply #8 on: January 02, 2013, 05:35:17 PM »

This is from the NY Times (for which my nickname is Pravda On The Hudson: POTH) so caveat lector:
==============

PHOENIX — Arizona used to be a knife carrier’s nightmare, with a patchwork of local laws that forced those inclined to strap Buck knives or other sharp objects to their belts to tread carefully as they moved from Phoenix (no knives except pocketknives) to Tempe (no knives at all) to Tucson (no knives on library grounds).

D’Alton Holder, a longtime knife maker, said, “It’s ridiculous to talk about the size of the knife as if that makes a difference.”
But that changed earlier this year when Arizona made its Legislature the sole arbiter of knife regulations. And because of loose restrictions on weapons here, Arizona is now considered a knife carrier’s dream, a place where everything from a samurai sword to a switchblade can be carried without a quibble.

Arizona’s transformation, and the recent lifting of a ban on switchblades, stilettos, dirks and daggers in New Hampshire, has given new life to the knife rights lobby, the little-known cousin of the more politically potent gun rights movement. Its vision is a knife-friendly America, where blades are viewed not as ominous but as tools — the equivalent of sharp-edged screw drivers or hammers — that serve useful purposes and can save lives as well as take them.

Sure, knife fights and knife attacks are a concern. No knife-lover would ever deny that. In fact, Todd Rathner, the lobbyist for Knife Rights Inc., an advocacy group based in Arizona that is now in its third year, was mugged twice in New York City before moving to Tucson, once — “ironically,” he said — at knifepoint.

But the problem is with the knife wielder, not the knife itself, the knife lobby says, sounding very much like those who advocate for gun rights.

In fact, knife advocates contend that the Second Amendment applies to knives as well as guns. They focus their argument elsewhere, though, emphasizing that knives fill so many beneficial roles, from carving Thanksgiving turkeys to whittling, that they do not deserve the bad name they often get.

“People talk about how knives are dangerous, and then they go in the kitchen and they have 50 of them,” said D’Alton Holder, a veteran knife maker who lives in Wickenberg, Ariz. “It’s ridiculous to talk about the size of the knife as if that makes a difference. If you carry a machete that’s three feet long, it’s no more dangerous than any knife. You can do just as much damage with an inch-long blade, even a box cutter.”

As for the pocketknife he carries with him every day, Mr. Holder said: “I use it for everything — to clean my fingernails, to prune a tree or carve, even to eat dinner with. I never think about the knives that I carry or the knives that I make as weapons.”

Jennifer Coffey, the New Hampshire state representative who led the effort to overturn the state’s switchblade ban, is also an emergency medical technician who uses knives to extract people from vehicles after accidents. Even when switchblades were outlawed, there were exceptions for emergency workers and others who might use them on the job, but Ms. Coffey still considered the law outrageous.

“We had certain knives that were illegal, but I could walk down the street with a kitchen knife that I used to carve a turkey and that would be legal,” Ms. Coffey said. “I’d be more scared of a kitchen knife than a switchblade.”

She said switchblade bans were passed in the 1950s because of the menacing use of the knives in movies like “West Side Story” and “Rebel Without a Cause.” Her legislation drew the support of an array of knife-related entities: Knife Rights, a young upstart in knife advocacy; the American Knife and Tool Institute, a group based in Wyoming that represents knife manufacturers, sellers and owners; and publications like Blade, Cutlery News Journal and Knife World.

The effort to lift the ban on switchblades in New Hampshire even won the support of the New Hampshire Association of Chiefs of Police.

==========



In Arizona, however, police groups were more circumspect about lifting all of the local knife laws. The Arizona Association of Chiefs of Police opposed the move, saying local jurisdictions ought to set their own knife restrictions. The Phoenix Law Enforcement Association remained neutral.

In much of the country, especially in urban areas, knives are still viewed as weapons in need of tight control.
District Attorney Cyrus R. Vance Jr. of Manhattan announced in June that his office had pressured retail stores that were selling illegal knives to remove them from their shelves, forfeit profits from the knives made over the last four years and help finance a campaign to educate people against illegal knives.

“What makes these knives so dangerous is the ease with which they can be concealed and brandished,” Mr. Vance said of the illegal switchblades and gravity knives, which require a wrist flip to open instead of a switchblade’s spring, that were bought by undercover agents.

Mr. Vance’s offensive drew the ire of the American Knife and Tool Institute, which issued an “action alert” and offered to assist New York retailers and individuals charged with knife violations with their legal defenses.

The knife lobby similarly rose up in 2009 when the federal Customs and Border Protection agency issued a proposal that would have reclassified many pocketknives and pocket tools as switchblades and thus made them illegal for import or sale across state lines under the 1958 federal Switchblade Act. In the end, Congress intervened and blocked the change.

A case now unfolding in Seattle shows how volatile knives continue to be. A police officer there fatally shot a man in August after, the officer said, he ordered the man several times to drop a knife that he was carrying. But the legitimacy of the shooting has been questioned by the Police Department, partly because the knife, which had a three-inch blade, was found in a closed position near the body of the dead man, who had been using it to carve a piece of wood.

Knife advocates are hoping that, just as Arizona’s immigration law has led to a national debate on that topic, its move to end knife restrictions will lead more states to take up the cause.

“Arizona is now the model when it comes to knives,” said Mr. Rathner, who was a National Rifle Association lobbyist before he switched to knives. “We’re now going to be moving to other states, probably in the Rocky Mountains and the Southeast. There’s probably half a dozen or more places that are ripe for this.”


  Wow......They haven't taken any guns yet, and they're already fantasizing about knife bans.......Hubris in spades.  The UK has moved on from banning knives to attempting to ban certain martial arts and martial 'artists' considered 'too dangerous' for it's citizens to possess knowledge of..........All this while the streets of Europe are becoming more dangerous as they flood their countries with alien cultures that are fundamentally antagonistic. 

Those who beat their swords into plowshares often find themselves toiling under the yokes of those who kept their swords.
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sgtmac_46
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« Reply #9 on: January 02, 2013, 05:40:00 PM »

  'Cocaine is a helluva drug' -Al Sharpton (said to undercover agents during a sting)

http://www.thesmokinggun.com/documents/celebrity/sharpton-and-rosemond-658234

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,58469,00.html
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sgtmac_46
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« Reply #10 on: January 02, 2013, 05:45:26 PM »

  'Cocaine is a helluva drug' -Al Sharpton (said to undercover agents during a sting)

I'm not worried about pocket knives, i'd be more worried about Al calling me an 'interloper' and sending one of his thugs in to burn my store down with me in it........Seems to be the way he does business.

http://www.thesmokinggun.com/documents/celebrity/sharpton-and-rosemond-658234

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,58469,00.html
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #11 on: April 13, 2013, 08:28:38 PM »

ttt
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #12 on: April 16, 2013, 11:20:20 PM »

Kansas Comprehensive Knife Rights Bill Signed by Governor!   
After two years of hard work, Kansas Governor Sam Brownback has signed the Knife Rights comprehensive knife law reform act, HB2033 into law today.
 
HB2033 repeals all existing local knife laws in Kansas and enacts statewide preemption of any attempt to pass new local knife laws more restrictive than state law. HB2033 also repeals the ban on the possession of switchblades, dirks, daggers and stilettos. Be advised that the new law does not go into effect until July 1st.
 
Knife Rights would like to thank Representative Richard Carlson for sponsoring this bill and working so hard to get it passed and signed. We would also like to thank Patricia Stoneking, the President of the Kansas State Rifle Association, for her help and counsel throughout this long process. We would also like to recognize the efforts of former Kansas State Representative Gary Hayzlett.   
 
Your emails and calls were also critical for us to achieve comprehensive knife law reform in Kansas, our first victory this year.  This makes Kansas the fifth state to enact Knife Law Preemption, following the first-in-the-nation Knife Law Preemption bill by Knife Rights in Arizona in 2010.
 
Preemption is the foundation for ensuring that any improvement in state knife laws is not contravened by local authorities. That's why Knife Law Preemption is Knife Rights' number one legislative priority.  Individual constitutional rights should not be left to discretion of local governments. State preemption of the law is commonplace for all individual civil rights.

Knife Law Preemption makes the state the sole authority on knife law. It repeals the confusing patchwork of local laws and ordinances more restrictive than state law that trap unwary citizens and prevents passage of such local laws and ordinances in the future. 
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #13 on: April 25, 2013, 05:37:12 PM »

Indiana Passes Knife Rights Switchblade Ban Repeal
After two years of effort by Knife Rights and our sponsors, the Indiana legislature has repealed the state's irrational ban on switchblade knives. Senator Jim Tomes and Senator Johnny Nugent have worked tirelessly with Knife Rights to pass this repeal.

Initially passed unanimously by the Indiana Senate, passage of the bill has been thwarted two years in a row by a single House committee chairman who refused to hear the bill. Senators Tomes and Nugent were able to bypass the obstinate chairman by adding the repeal language to a Conference Committee Report on HB1563 dealing with related matters. This Report was passed by the Indiana House 78-19 on Wednesday and the Indiana Senate 50-0 today.   
 
HB1563 with the included Switchblade Ban Repeal language now goes to Governor Mike Pence. Please contact Governor Pence and ask him to sign HB1563.
 
His phone is: 317-232-4567
To email him, you must use the online form at:  http://www.in.gov/gov/2333.htm 
 
When you call and email, keep it polite, short and to the point.
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