Dog Brothers Public Forum
Return To Homepage
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
July 28, 2015, 04:50:42 PM

Login with username, password and session length
Search:     Advanced search
Welcome to the Dog Brothers Public Forum.
87199 Posts in 2280 Topics by 1069 Members
Latest Member: ctelerant
* Home Help Search Login Register
+  Dog Brothers Public Forum
|-+  Politics, Religion, Science, Culture and Humanities
| |-+  Politics & Religion
| | |-+  Egypt
« previous next »
Pages: 1 ... 6 7 [8] Print
Author Topic: Egypt  (Read 61223 times)
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 33805


« Reply #350 on: July 24, 2014, 10:03:18 AM »

Egypt: Deaths in policy custody, once a spark for revolt, now met by shrugs' (Louisa Loveluck, The Christian Science Monitor)

"With little public outcry, more than 80 people have died in custody over the past year, according to independent monitor Wikithawra. In June 2010, photos of the shattered face of Khaled Said, a young man killed in police custody, laid the groundwork for mass protests in Egypt against longtime strongman Hosni Mubarak. His downfall in February 2011 was a landmark in the so-called Arab Spring, which still has aftershocks roiling the region. 

Last July, Egypt's military ousted the country's first elected president, Mohamed Morsi, and launched an aggressive crackdown against dissidents. Egypt's police are back to the most brutal practices of the Mubarak era, and deaths in custody have surged once again. But this time popular anger is muted, as many swing behind a repressive security state as a bulwark against the chaos and sectarianism that came in Mubarak's wake, particularly after police retreated from the streets."
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 33805


« Reply #351 on: August 20, 2014, 05:55:05 PM »



Click here to watch: New Group in Cairo Threatens to Carry Out Terror Attacks

A video has surfaced of a new terrorist group in Cairo that has threatened to carry out terrorist attacks in Egypt. The group, which calls itself the "Helwan Brigades", released a video in which its members are seen holding weapons and saying, "Our message to [the Interior Ministry] is that you are our targets." “We are fed up with the peacefulness of the Muslim Brotherhood. We are no Muslim Brotherhood. We are fed up with their peaceful demonstrations. When we go on demonstrations, blood is shed, women are raped, and property is stolen,” said one member of the group. “This is a warning to the Interior Ministry in south Cairo. This is what we have throughout south Cairo. Our message to you is that you are our targets because of what you have done to us. You did not spare us. You did not care that we are your brothers. You have shed blood, raped women, and even got the women of Muslims pregnant,” he threatened. “None of you opposed this or was held accountable, because you support a coup. Your army is the Camp David army, which for 60 years [fought] the Muslims, but did not shoot a single bullet at the Jews,” he charged.

Watch Here

Egypt has been plagued by unrest and terrorist attacks for several years, and there has been an increase in attacks since the ouster last year of Muslim Brotherhood president Mohammed Morsi. Most of the terrorist attacks have been claimed by the Al-Qaeda-inspired Ansar Bayt al-Maqdis. Among the attacks claimed by the group was the assassination of a top Egyptian police general, who was gunned down as he left his home in a west Cairo neighborhood, and a bus bombing on a tour bus filled with South Korean tourists in the Sinai. The group has also claimed responsibility for several rocket attacks that targeted the Israeli resort city of Eilat. Egypt’s government has said there is a direct link between the Muslim Brotherhood and Ansar Bayt al-Maqdis, and on this basis blacklisted the Brotherhood as a terror organization.
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 33805


« Reply #352 on: October 11, 2014, 02:51:35 PM »


http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/08/world/as-egyptians-grasp-for-stability-sisi-fortifies-his-presidency.html?nlid=49641193&src=recpb&_r=0
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 33805


« Reply #353 on: October 29, 2014, 12:57:16 PM »



http://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-29811722?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_term=*Mideast%20Brief&utm_campaign=2014_The%20Middle%20East%20Daily_10.29.14
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 33805


« Reply #354 on: November 02, 2014, 12:56:37 PM »



Click here to watch: Egypt Expels Gazans While the World sits Silently

Arab residents of Gaza were rounded up by armed soldiers and forced to flee their homes, which were promptly exploded in impressive plumes of dust and sand - but the soldiers were Egyptian, and there has been no international criticism of the buffer zone Egypt is establishing by force on the Gaza side of the Sinai border. In the buffer zone plan, Egypt is seizing and evacuating all homes and farmland up to 500 meters (over 1,640 feet) into Gaza, all along the 13 kilometer (over eight mile) border. Additionally, a channel with a depth and width of 20 meters (over 65 feet) will be dug along the Gaza border. The expulsion is in fact being sped up, after the Egyptian army said Saturday night it discovered hundreds more smuggling tunnels into Sinai from satellite imagery, reports the Arabic-language Sky News as cited by Yedioth Aharonoth. As of last week, 200 families living in the buffer zone area defined by Egypt had accepted a financial package to compensate their abandonment of their homes, but 680 more families were still refusing. Video uploaded on Saturday shows the expulsion in full steam, as Egyptian tanks and helicopters can be seen over a Gazan town. Armed soldiers go house-by-house and residents flee with all of their belongings loaded into cars, before cranes knock down their homes and explosions rend the air.

Watch Here

The Egyptian move follows two lethal terror attacks two weeks ago on Friday, in which at least 31 Egyptian soldiers were killed in El-Arish in the Sinai by a suicide bombing and a shooting attack. Egyptian sources revealed last week that Hamas terrorists had provided the weapons for the attack through one of its smuggling tunnels under the border to Sinai; the attacks were conducted by Ansar Bayt al-Maqdis jihadists, members of a group sympathetic to Islamic State (ISIS). Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi justified the expulsion by citing the attacks, which led him to declare Sinai in a state of emergency, and insisting "Egypt is fighting a war of existence." Despite the fact that Hamas terrorists aim to destroy Israel, IDF actions to defend Israel from attack such as in the recent counter-terror operation have been met with a tidal wave of international criticism - the Egyptian expulsion of Gaza has been met with no such condemnation so far. Egypt has been cracking down on Hamas, in recent months banning the Muslim Brotherhood offshoot and implementing a siege on Gaza. While Egypt has deployed troops to the Sinai to fight the rampant jihadist terrorism in the region in coordination with Israel, concerns remain that the Egyptian disarmament of the peninsula as part of its peace agreement with Israel may be in danger of collapsing altogether, posing a potential military threat to Israel.

Source: Arutz Sheva


Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 33805


« Reply #355 on: January 06, 2015, 09:15:37 AM »



•  A Libyan tribal leader said 13 Egyptian Coptic Christians were held by people smugglers, not abducted, and that they have been freed, however Egypt’s Foreign Ministry denies the report.


•  Masked gunmen killed two Egyptian policemen guarding a Coptic Christian church in Minya Tuesday, a day ahead of Coptic Christmas celebrations.
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 33805


« Reply #356 on: January 30, 2015, 12:01:36 PM »

CAIRO — A series of simultaneous bombings targeting security facilities in the Sinai killed at least 26 people Thursday night, prompting fears that the Egyptian government’s campaign of home demolitions, curfews and sweeping arrests has failed to choke off a budding insurgency there.

The wave of bombings was the first major outburst of violence since the main Islamist militant group operating in the Sinai pledged allegiance to the Islamic State in November.

Through a Twitter account linked to the group, now known as the Sinai Province of the Islamic State, it claimed responsibility for the attacks on more than a half-dozen locations.

The assault, involving nearly simultaneous bombings in several places around the cities of Arish and Rafah, was the most complicated and widely coordinated terrorist attack in Egypt in years. It was also the deadliest attack in the Sinai since a multistage assault on a military checkpoint killed at least 31 people on the night of Oct. 24.

Indeed, the ambition of the attack suggested either that the Sinai militants may be following the advice, or the example, of the Islamic State extremist group, or perhaps that the Sinai outfit sought a spectacular attack to advertise its new affiliation.

Residents of the Sinai and the Egyptian state news media said that attackers had deployed multiple car bombs and mortars against several government targets: the North Sinai security headquarters in Arish, the provincial capital; a nearby army base; a hotel used by the police; a security camp near the border town of Rafah; and several checkpoints.

Al Ahram, Egypt’s flagship state newspaper, reported that its office in Arish had also been struck, although apparently only because it was near the security headquarters and not because it was a target.

Health officials said the bombings had injured more than 100 people, according to the state news media. “This means that the military does not control Sinai, as it claims,” said Khalil al-Anani, a professor at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies who studies extremism. “The insurgency is getting stronger and stronger, and the government’s strategy is a failure.”

Borhan el-Beek, a resident of Arish, said his home was about 400 yards from a complex of security buildings that were attacked in four places about 7:30 p.m., not long after the start of the nightly curfew.

“Now there are soldiers and patrols filling the streets,” he said, “and I can see from my balcony there are tanks making the rounds.”

The army “has been fighting terrorism for a year and a half, and how are the percentages? Is it increasing or decreasing?” he asked. “In the North Sinai, we just don’t know.”

Islamist militants have long found a haven in the rugged and loosely governed Sinai Peninsula, capitalizing on its marginalization and the widespread resentment of the police. In the 18 months since the military ousted President Mohamed Morsi of the Muslim Brotherhood, however, the Sinai has become the center of a campaign of retaliatory attacks on Egyptian security forces that has become the most significant challenge to rule of Mr. Morsi’s successor, President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi.

In an effort to combat the attacks, Mr. Sisi, a former defense minister, has ordered a virtual military occupation of the region. Helicopter gunships have destroyed homes and buildings believed to conceal militants. Residents describe large networks of police informants and widespread arrests.

After the embarrassment of the Oct. 24 attack, security forces announced the forced evacuation and demolition of more than 800 homes within about a kilometer of the border with the Gaza Strip and Israel. That ultimately led to the razing of much of the border town of Rafah.

The authorities said that was necessary to seal off tunnels under the border with Gaza, which they said had been used by militants to attack and escape.

But the scale of Thursday’s assault indicates that the militants have retained sufficient ability to operate despite the crackdown.

“They have displaced a lot of people, and that undoubtedly creates a lot of resentment and increases the atmosphere of permissiveness for this kind of violence,” said Tamara Cofman Wittes, director of the Center for Middle East Policy at the Brookings Institution and a former deputy assistant secretary of state for Near Eastern affairs.

“It is clear that this extremely coercive approach is not working,” she added.

Spokesmen for the military and the police did not respond to requests for comment. Mr. Beek, the resident of Arish, said he wished the Sinai could return to the time before the surge in violence. He lamented the forced evacuations, strict curfews and constrictions on the ability to enter or leave the Sinai.

“More increases in the pressure on the citizens of Sinai, making them feel really like seventh- and eighth-rate citizens,” he said.
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 33805


« Reply #357 on: February 16, 2015, 08:41:53 AM »

http://www.wsj.com/articles/egypt-strikes-islamic-state-targets-in-libya-1424071790?mod=WSJ_hp_LEFTTopStories
Logged
G M
Power User
***
Posts: 12599


« Reply #358 on: February 16, 2015, 09:22:38 AM »


Wait, I thought Obama gave a speech in Cairo that was going to make all this go away.
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 33805


« Reply #359 on: February 16, 2015, 09:28:51 AM »

A powerful and symbolic statement with ACTION by Al Sisi that I am sure the Coptics will note.
Logged
G M
Power User
***
Posts: 12599


« Reply #360 on: February 16, 2015, 09:47:43 AM »

A powerful and symbolic statement with ACTION by Al Sisi that I am sure the Coptics will note.


Well, I bet the U.S. State Department is working on a heck of a Twitter hashtag that will make ISIS really regret their junior varsity actions.
Logged
DougMacG
Power User
***
Posts: 6576


« Reply #361 on: February 16, 2015, 06:31:19 PM »

Wait, I thought Obama gave a speech in Cairo that was going to make all this go away.

Funny what difference 6 years can make.  More than half the country back then hoped that was true.  Now it is known that even air strikes won't stop this enemy. 

You earn peace in one of two ways, defeat or deter your enemies.  It is too late for this President to establish any deterrence and he seeks 'authorization' to prevent us from defeating anyone.  After losing the House, the Senate, 64% of the Governorships and 70% of the state legislative chambers, he is now in the process of guaranteeing the election of a Hawk to succeed him.
Logged
G M
Power User
***
Posts: 12599


« Reply #362 on: February 16, 2015, 07:42:24 PM »

Funny how Jordan and now Egypt have leaders who have stepped up to face this enemy and yet we have an empty chair. Eastwood was very prescient.

Then again, Obama's golf balls aren't going to hit themselves...
Logged
c - Shadow Dog
Power User
***
Posts: 109


« Reply #363 on: February 16, 2015, 09:28:26 PM »

GM,

On the Point of Jordan and Egypt stepping up to the plate.  I like that regional powers are taking care of their own business on a local level. They don't need us to be the police man any longer.

TC
Logged
ccp
Power User
***
Posts: 4520


« Reply #364 on: February 17, 2015, 07:24:04 AM »

"he is now in the process of guaranteeing the election of a Hawk to succeed him."

Step right up the first female President:  Hillary.   "Break all those glass ceilings".  The Hawkster in waiting.   wink  Warrior woman.   Don't mess with this Amazon.

And that is partly what the Warren crowd is about.   She is a "war monger".  Poor code stink.  They won't know what to do.   We know they won't vote Republican.
Logged
G M
Power User
***
Posts: 12599


« Reply #365 on: February 17, 2015, 08:01:42 PM »

GM,

On the Point of Jordan and Egypt stepping up to the plate.  I like that regional powers are taking care of their own business on a local level. They don't need us to be the police man any longer.

TC

Yes, but they lack the ability to destroy ISIS. We are they only ones with the capacity to take them out.
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 33805


« Reply #366 on: February 17, 2015, 09:37:38 PM »

ISIS has how many troops right now?  40,000? Scattered over how much terrain?

How many does Egypt have?  How many does Jordan have?  House of Saud?  UAE?  Kuwait?
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 33805


« Reply #367 on: February 20, 2015, 08:13:08 AM »

http://www.breitbart.com/national-security/2015/02/19/pentagon-refuses-to-back-egyptian-bombing-of-isis-in-libya-after-christian-slaughter/
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 33805


« Reply #368 on: March 06, 2015, 09:21:50 AM »

In recent weeks, Egypt has begun diluting its forces stationed along the Philadelphi route on its border with Gaza, Israeli defense officials warned Thursday. This move has prompted fear among defense officials that a terrorist takeover could occur in Sinai and violence against Israel would resume. Egyptian president Abdel Fatah al-Sisi delighted the Israeli defense establishment when, in recent months, he allocated substantial resources to fight terrorism in Sinai - particularly, the destruction of smuggling tunnels between Sinai and Gaza as part of the construction of a buffer zone. However, with the threat of an Islamic State (ISIS) presence in Libya on its western border, Egypt has started transferring large numbers of forces there.

Watch Here

"Egypt is working according to its priorities, and at this time the Libyan border is more threatening," a defense official told Walla! News. "It is a border of more than a thousand kilometers being penetrated by ISIS terrorists, raging across Libya and murdering Egyptian citizens," he explained. "The transition of special forces from Sinai to the border with Libya will harm Egypt's pressure on terrorist organizations that may act against Israel," the official warned. While Israel's cooperation with Cairo in the fight against terrorism has tightened and been very effective in the past year, there is still cause for concern in Israel. In light of recent tensions with Washington, Cairo has begun to get closer with Russia, which could play against Israel in the future.
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 33805


« Reply #369 on: March 21, 2015, 10:59:48 PM »

http://www.wsj.com/articles/the-weekend-interview-islams-improbable-reformer-1426889862?mod=trending_now_4
Islam’s Improbable Reformer
‘We are keen on a strategic relationship with the U.S. above everything else,’ says Egypt’s new president. ‘And we will never turn our backs on you—even if you turn your backs on us.’
ENLARGE
Photo: Zina Saunders
By
Bret Stephens
March 20, 2015 6:17 p.m. ET
168 COMMENTS

Cairo

When then-Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi appointed a little-known general named Abdel Fattah Al Sisi to be his new defense minister in August 2012, rumors swirled that the officer was chosen for his sympathy with the teachings of Mr. Morsi’s Muslim Brotherhood. One telltale sign, people said, was the zabiba on the general’s forehead—the darkened patch of skin that is the result of frequent and fervent prayer.

A pious Muslim must surely also be a political Islamist—or so Mr. Morsi apparently assumed. But the general would soon give the world a lesson in the difference between religious devotion and radicalism.

“There are misconceptions and misperceptions about the real Islam,” now-President Sisi tells me during a two-hour interview in his ornate, century-old presidential palace in Heliopolis. “Religion is guarded by its spirit, by its core, not by human beings. Human beings only take the core and deviate it to the right or left.”

Does he mean to say, I ask, that members of the Muslim Brotherhood are bad Muslims? “It’s the ideology, the ideas,” he replies.

“The real Islamic religion grants absolute freedom for the whole people to believe or not believe. Never does Islam dictate to kill others because they do not believe in Islam. Never does it dictate that [Muslims] have the right to dictate [their beliefs] to the whole world. Never does Islam say that only Muslims will go to paradise and others go to hell.”

Jabbing his right finger in the air for emphasis, he adds: “We are not gods on earth, and we do not have this right to act in the name of Allah.”
***

When Mr. Sisi took power in July 2013, following street protests against Mr. Morsi by an estimated 30 million Egyptians, it wasn’t obvious that he would emerge as perhaps the world’s most significant advocate for Islamic moderation and reform. His personal piety aside, Mr. Sisi seemed to be a typical Egyptian military figure. Unflattering comparisons were made to Hosni Mubarak, a former air force general and Egypt’s president-for-life until his downfall in 2011.

The similarities are misleading. Mr. Mubarak came of age in the ideological anti-colonialist days of Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser, trained in the Soviet Union, and led the air campaign against Israel in the 1973 Yom Kippur War. Anwar Sadat elevated him to the vice presidency in 1975 as a colorless second-fiddle, his very lack of imagination being an asset to Sadat. He became president only due to Sadat’s assassination six years later.

Mr. Sisi, now 60, came of age in a very different era. When he graduated from the Military Academy, in 1977, Egypt was a close American ally on the cusp of making peace with Israel. Rather than being packed off to Russia, he headed for military training in Texas and later the infantry course at Fort Benning, Ga. He returned for another extended stay in the U.S. in 2005 at the Army War College in Carlisle, Pa.

Recalling the two visits, he notes the difference. “The U.S. had been a community that had been living in peace and security. Before 9/11, even the military bases were open. There was almost no difference between civilian life and life on a military base. By 2005, I could feel the tightening.”

The remark is intended to underscore to a visiting American journalist his deep sympathy with and admiration for the U.S. He also goes out of his way to stress that he has no intention of altering the pro-American tilt of Egyptian foreign policy, despite suggestions that he is flirting with Russia’s Vladimir Putin for potential arms purchases and the construction of Egypt’s first nuclear power plant.

“A country like Egypt will never be mischievous with bilateral relations” with America, he insists. “We will never act foolishly.” When I ask about the delivery of F-16 fighters to Egypt—suspended by the U.S. after Mr. Morsi’s overthrow, and now pending a decision by President Obama—he all-but dismisses the matter.

“You can never reduce our relations with the U.S. to matters of weapons systems. We are keen on a strategic relationship with the U.S. above everything else. And we will never turn our backs on you—even if you turn your backs on us.”

There is also a deeper purpose to Mr. Sisi’s pro-American entreaties and his comments on 9/11: He wants to remind his critics of the trade-off every country strikes between security and civil liberties.

It’s a point he returns to when I note the anger and disappointment that so many Egyptian liberals—many of whom had backed him in 2013—now feel. New laws that tightly restrict street protests recall the Mubarak era. Last June several Al Jazeera journalists, including Australian reporter Peter Greste, were sentenced to lengthy prison terms on dubious charges of reporting that was “damaging to national security,” though they have since been released. The Muslim Brotherhood has been banned, Mr. Morsi is in prison and on trial, and Egyptian courts have passed death sentences on hundreds of alleged Islamists, albeit mostly in absentia.

“My message to liberals is that I am very keen to meet their expectations,” Mr. Sisi rejoins. “But the situation in Egypt is overwhelmed.” He laments the Al Jazeera arrests, noting that the incident damaged Egypt’s reputation even as thousands of international correspondents “are working very freely in this country.”

Later, while addressing a question about the Egyptian economy, he offers a franker assessment. “In the last four years our internal debt doubled to $300 billion. Do not separate my answer to the question regarding disappointed liberals. Their country needs to survive. We don’t have the luxury to fight and feud and take all our time discussing issues like that. A country needs security and order for its mere existence. If the world can provide support I will let people demonstrate in the streets day and night.”

Sensing my skepticism, he adds: “You can’t imagine that as an American. You are speaking the language of a country that is at the top of progress: cultural, financial, political, civilizational—it’s all there in the U.S.” But if American standards were imposed on Egypt, he adds, it would do his country no favors.

“I talk about U.S. values of democracy and freedom. They should be honored. But they need the atmosphere where those values can be nurtured. If we can bring prosperity we can safeguard those values not just in words.”

All of this seems in keeping with Mr. Sisi’s military upbringing and reminds me of Pervez Musharraf, the former Pakistani general turned president. But the comparison is fundamentally inapt. Under Mr. Musharraf, Pakistan continued to make opportunistic deals with terrorists while giving safe harbor to leaders of the Afghan Taliban.

By contrast, it’s impossible to doubt the seriousness of Mr. Sisi’s opposition to Islamic extremism, or his aversion to exporting instability. In late February he ordered the bombing of Islamic State targets in neighboring Libya after ISIS decapitated 21 Egyptian Coptic Christians. Egypt’s security cooperation with Israel has never been closer, and Mr. Sisi has moved aggressively to close the tunnels beneath Egypt’s border with Gaza, through which Hamas has obtained its weapons.

Later this month, Mr. Sisi will host an Arab League summit, the centerpiece of which will be a joint Arab antiterrorism task force. He says he won’t put Egyptian boots on the ground to fight ISIS in Iraq, which he says is a job for Iraqis with U.S. help. And he takes care to avoid mentioning Iran’s regional ambitions or saying anything critical of its nuclear negotiations, which he says he supports while adding that “I understand the concern of the Israelis.”

But he does say the new force is needed “to preserve what is left” of the stable Arab world. In particular, he stresses that “there shouldn’t be any arrangements at the expense of the Gulf states. The security of the Gulf states is indispensable for the security of Egypt.”

He also decries the Western habit of intervening militarily and then failing to take account of the consequences. “Look, NATO had a mission in Libya and its mission was not accomplished,” he says. The U.N. continues to impose an arms embargo on Libya that adversely affects the legitimate, non-Islamist government based in Tobruk while “armed militias obtain an unstoppable flow of arms and munitions.”

“I wasn’t with the Gadhafi regime,” he says, “but there is a difference between taking an action and being aware of what that action will bring about. The risks of extremism and terrorism weren’t clear in the minds of the U.S. and Europe. It is really dangerous if countries lose control because extremists will cause them problems beyond their imagination.” The same lesson, he emphasizes, applies to the U.S. invasion of Iraq.

But Mr. Sisi is not a dogmatic critic of muscular U.S. involvement in the Middle East. Pondering the prospect of a broad U.S. retreat from the region, Mr. Sisi sounds like the most enthusiastic proponent of Pax Americana.

“The United States has the strength, and with might comes responsibility,” he says. “That is why it is committed and has responsibilities toward the whole world. It is not reasonable or acceptable that with all that might the United States will not be committed and have responsibilities toward the Middle East. The Middle East is passing through the most difficult and critical time and this will only entail more involvement, not less.”

Meantime, Mr. Sisi sees it as his personal mission to save Egypt, even as he insists he has no intention of becoming another president-for-life. When I ask him to name Mr. Mubarak’s biggest mistake, he says simply: “He stayed in power for a long time.”

A day before our interview, I watched him close an investment conference in the resort town of Sharm el-Sheikh, where he celebrated General Electric’s decision to invest to ease Egypt’s chronic power outages. He describes his economic philosophy as “the need to encourage the business community to come here and invest.” He constantly stresses the imperative of acting swiftly: “The magnitude of the effort needed to secure the needs of 90 million people is huge and beyond any one man’s effort.”

He’s also aware that the most important work will take time. In January Mr. Sisi went before the religious clerics of Cairo’s Al-Azhar university to demand a “revolution” in Islam. The follow-through won’t be easy. “The most difficult thing to do is change a religious rhetoric and bring a shift in how people are used to their religion,” he says. “Don’t imagine the results will be seen in a few months or years. Radical misconceptions [about Islam] were instilled 100 years ago. Now we can see the results.”

That’s not to say he doesn’t think it’s doable. “Popular sympathy with the idea of religion was dominating the whole scene in Egypt for years in the past. This does not exist anymore. This is a change I consider strategic. Because what brought the Muslim Brotherhood to power was Egyptian sympathy with the concept of religion. Egyptians believed that the Muslim Brothers were advocates of the real Islam. The past three years have been a critical test to those people who were promoting religious ideas. Egyptians experienced it totally and said these people do not deserve sympathy and we will not allow it.”

Throughout our interview, Mr. Sisi has been speaking in Arabic through an interpreter. But after delivering this point, he said in colloquial American English, “You got that?”

Mr. Stephens writes the Journal’s “Global View” column.
Popular on WSJ



« Last Edit: March 21, 2015, 11:03:30 PM by Crafty_Dog » Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 33805


« Reply #370 on: May 16, 2015, 12:24:08 PM »

CAIRO—An Egyptian court on Saturday sentenced ousted President Mohammed Morsi to death for breaking out of prison during the height of the nation’s uprising in 2011, the latest blow against Islamist critics of the government.

The decision is the harshest of multiple sentences given to Mr. Morsi and underscores the breadth of current President Abdel Fattah Al Sisi’s crackdown on his chief political opponents, the Muslim Brotherhood.  The court’s preliminary verdict Saturday is subject to review by the Grand Mufti, Egypt’s highest religious authority, whose opinion isn’t legally binding but is traditionally adopted by the court.  A final verdict based his opinion will be delivered June 2 but will be open to appeals, which can take years in Egypt’s clogged judicial system.

Mr. Morsi has already been sentenced to 20 years in prison last month in a separate case in which he was found guilty of fomenting violence during a series of protests in 2012 that dogged his year in office.

The former Egyptian president was among 106 members and leaders of the Muslim Brotherhood sentenced to death on Saturday, including the group’s spiritual guide Mohammed Badie and prominent Islamic scholar, Youssef al-Qaradawi, who is based in Qatar.


The decision—broadcast on state television as Mr. Morsi and some of co-defendants smiled defiantly from inside the caged dock used to hold the accused—was received quietly in Egypt. However, authorities said it may have inspired a violent response in the restive Sinai Peninsula where security forces have struggled to contain a low-level Islamist insurgency.

Hours after the verdict was delivered, unknown gunmen attacked a vehicle carrying several judges and aides in the northern Sinai town of al-Arish, killing three judges, a driver, and wounding three others, according to Egypt’s state news agency.  There was no immediate claim of responsibility, but the state news agency quotes unnamed security officials saying the attack may have been retaliation for the verdict against Mr. Morsi.

Saturday’s decision is latest in a series of mass trials that have led to death penalty verdicts against the leadership and supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood. Human rights organizations have criticized the mass sentences, while some Western governments, including the U.S., have expressed concern over the apparent lack of due process. 
If Saturday’s verdicts are confirmed, the entire top leadership of the Muslim Brotherhood will be facing either life in prison or execution stemming from trials that began under Mr. Sisi’s leadership. The sentences represent the most comprehensive crackdown of the group since the modern Egyptian state was founded.

“The death penalty has become the favorite tool for the Egyptian authorities to purge the political opposition,” Amnesty International said in a statement on Saturday, calling Mr. Morsi’s trial “grossly unfair.”

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, a close ally of Mr. Morsi, slammed the Egyptian court’s decision and criticized western governments for not speaking forcibly enough against the crackdown on the Muslim Brotherhood.

“Unfortunately, they decided to execute Morsi. Egypt is turning to ancient Egypt,” Mr. Erdogan said, highlighting that Cairo could hang a leader elected democratically with 52% support.

Amr Darrag, a former cabinet minister under Mr. Morsi, said the verdict marks “one of the darkest days in Egypt’s history” in a statement from Turkey, where he remains in exile.

The defendants were accused of breaking out of Wadi al Natroun prison days after the 2011 uprising first began. He and other senior leaders of the Muslim Brotherhood had been ordered jailed by then president Hosni Mubarak , whose rule was being undermined by massive street protests that resulted in his resignation 18 days after they began on Jan. 25, 2011.  Two days after being detained, the prison was raided by armed groups who clashed with jail guards, ultimately beating the authorities into retreat.

In a phone call to Al Jazeera Arabic broadcast on the day of his escape, a panicked Mr. Morsi is heard saying he and his Muslim Brotherhood colleagues were freed by unknown men in both prison uniforms and in civilian clothes, and urged authorities to instruct him on how to proceed, vowing not to leave the prison without official permission.  In 2013, months after he had been deposed and arrested by Mr. Sisi, prosecutors charged Mr. Morsi with breaking out of the prison with the help of Hamas operatives they alleged had infiltrated Egypt during the chaotic uprising.

Mr. Al Sisi later became president after winning in a landslide against a weak opponent in 2014.

In a statement, Hamas said some of the defendants found guilty in the case are members of their organization who had died before the 2011 uprising or who were serving lengthy prison sentences in Israel.

Critics of the regime have drawn comparisons between Mr. Morsi’s legal fate and that of Mr. Mubarak who has had nearly every legal case against him dismissed or has resulted in acquittal. On May 9, Mr. Mubarak was sentenced to three years in a retrial for corruption, but legal experts said he is unlikely to serve any of the time in prison owing to several years of detention—mostly in a military hospital—since his ouster in 2011.

—Emre Peker in Istanbul contributed to this article.

Write to Tamer El-Ghobashy at tamer.el-ghobashy@wsj.com
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 33805


« Reply #371 on: May 18, 2015, 01:17:39 PM »

Egypt’s Leader Reinvents Himself as Bulwark Against Terrorism
Abdel Fatah Al Sisi, criticized for cracking down on his Islamist opponents, is embraced for his stand against Islamic State
By Tamer El-Ghobashy
May 18, 2015 5:30 a.m. ET
WSJ

CAIRO—The specter of an expanding Islamic State has alarmed leaders across the Middle East. But for Egyptian President Abdel Fattah Al Sisi, that threat has become an opportunity to transform himself from an international outcast to an ally in the regional war against terrorism.

Since Mr. Sisi came to power in a coup two years ago, his government has criminalized street protests, sentenced hundreds to death in mass trials and, according to the Egyptian Center for Economic and Social Rights, imprisoned some 40,000 political opponents and their supporters, drawing widespread international criticism.

He also has declared his main political opponent, the Muslim Brotherhood, a terrorist organization, despite its explicit denunciation of violence, putting the popular Islamist organization in the same category as avowedly militant groups such as Islamic State and al Qaeda.

On Saturday, a special court set up in the police academy in Cairo sentenced to death ousted President Mohammed Morsi, the former Muslim Brotherhood leader, and more than 100 other leaders and members of the organization, underscoring the breadth of Mr. Sisi’s crackdown.
Egypt's deposed President Mohammed Morsi in a defendant's cage as a judge sentences him and more than 100 others to death on Saturday. ENLARGE
Egypt's deposed President Mohammed Morsi in a defendant's cage as a judge sentences him and more than 100 others to death on Saturday. Illustration: Agence France-Presse/Getty Images

The Egyptian leader’s tough response to the emergence of Islamic State coupled with Iran’s expanding sway in traditionally Sunni Muslim spheres of influence have boosted the 60-year-old retired army general’s stock in the region as a bulwark against extremism.

At the same time, his declarations about the need to “revolutionize” Islam to increase tolerance in the Arab and Islamic world have helped his image in Washington, opening the way for the Obama administration’s cautious embrace of the Egyptian leader.

The administration lifted a ban on arms sales to Cairo in March and promised to restore a $1.3 billion aid package, an annual commitment set forth in the 1979 Israel-Egypt peace treaty.

The aid was withheld after Mr. Morsi—Egypt’s first freely elected president—was deposed in a military coup led by Mr. Sisi in 2013, while he was still defense minister and head of the armed forces.

In renewing normal aid ties, National Security Council spokeswoman Bernadette Meehan said, the U.S. would seek to balance vital U.S.-Egyptian security ties with meaningful Egyptian political overhauls.

A State Department official on Sunday said the mass death sentences were deeply troubling.

    ‘‘Sisi played this card very well by convincing the administration that the main objective is to fight terrorism. A common enemy brings the countries together again.’’
    —Khalil al-Anani, Middle East scholar

“We have consistently spoken out against the practice of mass trials and sentences, which are conducted in a manner that is inconsistent with Egypt’s international obligations and the rule of law,” the official said.

Despite criticism of his methods, Mr. Sisi’s strategy of emphasizing the threat of terrorism, while selectively committing resources to fighting it, has paid off, said Khalil al-Anani, a Middle East scholar at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies in Washington.

“Sisi played this card very well by convincing the administration that the main objective is to fight terrorism,” Mr. Anani said. “A common enemy brings the countries together again.”

The cautious U.S. embrace of Mr. Sisi hasn’t appeared to markedly shift perceptions of him in Egypt.

To his supporters, he has brought welcome stability to Egypt following the upheavals of the Arab Spring, the ouster of longtime ruler Hosni Mubarak and the brief, turbulent presidential tenure of Mr. Morsi.

The death sentence imposed on Mr. Morsi on Saturday is subject to review by the Grand Mufti, Egypt’s highest religious authority, whose opinion isn’t legally binding but is often adopted by the court. A final verdict will be delivered June 2 but will be open to appeal, which can take years in Egypt’s clogged judicial system.

The former Egyptian president was among 106 members and leaders of the Muslim Brotherhood sentenced to death on Saturday, including the group’s spiritual guide, Mohammed Badie, and prominent Islamic scholar, Youssef al-Qaradawi, who is based in Qatar.

If the verdicts are confirmed, the entire top leadership of the Muslim Brotherhood will be facing either life in prison or execution stemming from trials that began under Mr. Sisi’s leadership. The sentences represent the most comprehensive crackdown on the group since the modern Egyptian state was founded.

In statements released from the group’s media offices overseas, the Brotherhood condemned the judge’s decision, calling it illegitimate and politically driven.

Amnesty International called the trial “grossly unfair,” saying “the death penalty has become the favorite tool for the Egyptian authorities to purge the political opposition.”

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, a close ally of Mr. Morsi, slammed the court’s decision and criticized Western governments for not speaking forcibly enough against the crackdown on the Muslim Brotherhood.

The defendants were accused of breaking out of Wadi al Natroun prison days after the 2011 uprising began. Mr. Morsi and other senior leaders of the Muslim Brotherhood had been ordered jailed by then-President Mubarak, whose rule was being undermined by massive street protests that resulted in his resignation 18 days after they began on Jan. 25, 2011.

Two days after being detained, the prison was raided by armed groups who clashed with jail guards, beating the authorities into retreat.

In a phone call to Al Jazeera Arabic broadcast on the day of his escape, a panicked Mr. Morsi is heard saying he and his Muslim Brotherhood colleagues were freed by unknown men in both prison uniforms and in civilian clothes, and urged authorities to instruct him on how to proceed, vowing not to leave the prison without official permission.

For his domestic critics, the warming U.S. attitude to Mr. Sisi has potentially damaging consequences for peaceful opponents of his government. They worry that it will give Egyptian authorities further license to treat the nonviolent opposition as harshly as those armed militants who have carried out sporadic attacks against police and security forces in Egypt.

“We are as exposed as we’ve ever been without even Western rhetoric suggesting that human rights in Egypt are a major concern,” said one activist whose colleagues are serving prison terms.

Hazem Abdel Azim, a top official in the Egyptian leader’s presidential campaign last year, announced on April 27 that he was withdrawing from politics indefinitely.

“I feel the political climate isn’t less dangerous than Mubarak’s days if one speaks freely,” Mr. Abdel Azim tweeted, referring to the long periods of authoritarian rule by the ex-Egyptian president. He didn’t respond to requests for further comment.

In Washington, congressional supporters of the Egyptian leader said he is a mainstay of international efforts to combat terrorism.

“They still have a way to go with their democratic reforms, but America needs strong allies like Egypt in the region,” said Rep. Mac Thornberry (R., Texas), chairman of the House Armed Services Committee.

Other members of Congress, however, voiced doubts over the wisdom of renewed arms sales to Mr. Sisi’s government.

Sen. Patrick Leahy (D., Vt.), co-author of a provision in the 2015 appropriations bill that now links continued U.S. military aid for Egypt to its progress on improving human rights and democracy, said this isn’t the time to hand Egypt a blank check.

“The United States should defend principles of democracy and human rights, and President al-Sisi’s government has systematically and flagrantly trampled on both,” Mr. Leahy said in an email.

Mr. Anani, the Middle East scholar, said he believes there is a long-term cost for both Egypt and its allies in making the military campaign against Islamist militants their central focus.

“It is back to the old days where security trumps everything else,” he said. “It is a shortsighted policy that can become counterproductive, increasing the kind of extremism that has created this regional instability.”

—Dahlia Kholaif in Cairo
contributed to this article.

Write to Tamer El-Ghobashy at tamer.el-ghobashy@wsj.com
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 33805


« Reply #372 on: June 02, 2015, 08:09:42 PM »

https://www.facebook.com/StandWithUs/videos/10152960188182689/
Logged
G M
Power User
***
Posts: 12599


« Reply #373 on: June 02, 2015, 08:38:22 PM »


What's the over/under on his brutal murder?
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 33805


« Reply #374 on: June 08, 2015, 04:02:31 AM »

CAIRO — Egypt is moving away from democracy, stifling freedom of expression, arresting thousands for political dissent and failing to hold the security forces accountable for “arbitrary or unlawful killings,” the Obama administration has determined in a formal report to Congress.

The administration concludes in the same report that Egypt is nevertheless too important to national security to end the roughly $1.5 billion a year it receives in American aid, most of it military. But after making that conclusion, the report proceeds to recite a discordant litany of the Egyptian government’s abuses and failings, apparently seeking to stop just short of the kind of embrace Washington once gave the strongman Hosni Mubarak.


Quietly submitted to Congress on May 12 without public announcement, the report captures the awkwardness of Washington’s rapidly shifting views of Egypt: first backing President Mubarak, then the 2011 revolt that ousted him, and now rebuilding ties with a new strongman, President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi.

Western diplomats are increasingly seeking to make the best of their relationship with Mr. Sisi, the former general who led a military takeover here two years ago, deposing the elected president, even amid reports that his government is tightening its crackdown on dissent.

“America is making the same mistake it did when they were supporting Hosni Mubarak,” said Mohamed Lotfy, a human rights advocate who was stopped last week at Cairo’s airport to prevent him from traveling to Germany during a visit there by Mr. Sisi.

By crushing hopes for peaceful and democratic political change, “Sisi is creating a new generation of terrorists, and exporting them to Syria and Iraq,” Mr. Lotfy said, while the United States has damaged its credibility in the region by “contradicting its values — or at least the values that it tries to export in speeches.”

Activists suggest that the Egyptian government may be cracking down now in anticipation of a call for a general strike by one of the activist groups that kicked off the revolt against Mr. Mubarak in 2011. It may also be preparing for potential protests at the end of the month, on the second anniversary of Mr. Sisi’s ouster of President Mohamed Morsi of the Muslim Brotherhood.


In recent weeks, the Egyptian police have detained at least three leaders of the left-leaning April 6 group, which has tried to call for the general strike on Thursday, and rights groups say several other activists have been rounded up or disappeared as well.

Mr. Lotfy said his group, the Egyptian Commission for Rights and Freedoms, was tracking the disappearances of 10 people, and Mona Seif, another activist, said she had confirmed 17.

Magdy Ashour, an Islamist activist who was featured in a documentary about the 2011 uprising called “The Square,” has also been detained, according to news reports.

Negad el-Borai, a prominent human rights lawyer, said he expected to be arrested as well, having been called in three times in recent weeks for interrogation about his opposition to torture and his previous work for human rights groups.

“Because of my past activities, I think they want revenge,” Mr. Borai said in an interview. “It will be a very hard summer.”

A talk show host, Reem Magued, was recently removed from the airwaves, and she said in an interview on another television program that her network, OnTV, had canceled her show because of government pressure. Its executives told her “there are pressures from a ‘sovereign institution’ ” — an intelligence agency, she said.

There have been efforts to suppress labor actions as well. On Sunday, a new video emerged showing soldiers firing into a crowd of workers at a military-owned cement factory in Sinai, apparently in an attempt to squelch a possible demonstration.

Two workers present, speaking on the condition of anonymity for their safety, said in separate telephone interviews that a group of workers had been approaching the administration office to request an ambulance for an injured colleague when the soldiers began shooting, killing at least one and wounding at least two others.

Spokesmen for the military, the Interior Ministry and the Foreign Ministry did not respond to messages seeking comment.

Sarah Leah Whitson, director of the Middle East division of Human Rights Watch, accused the Obama administration of shrugging off such rights violations even though “the government’s own memo acknowledges a laundry list of the worst human rights abuses.”

But Amy Hawthorne, a senior fellow at the Atlantic Council and a former State Department official, noted that the administration could have kept the report vague or even classified but chose to lay out at least some of the criticism.

“They are not doing as the U.S. did with the Mubarak regime — attempting to praise the regime for cosmetic steps at reform or downplay serious rights abuses,” she said.

The administration’s report credits Egypt with beginning to overhaul its economy by cutting subsidies, increasing taxes and improving the business climate, “including for U.S. businesses.” Because Egypt is the most populous Arab state and a bellwether in the region, its “success or failure impacts the prospects of peace, stability, democracy and economic growth across the Middle East,” it says.

But “the overall trajectory for rights and democracy has been negative,” the report continues. “A series of executive initiatives, new laws and judicial actions severely restrict freedom of the press, freedom of association, freedom of peaceful assembly and due process, and they undermine prospects for democratic governance.”

It noted that four American-Egyptian dual citizens were in Egyptian jails for cases with “potentially political overtones”; one of the four, Mohamed Soltan, was recently released and deported.

“Government forces have committed arbitrary or unlawful killings during the dispersal of demonstrators, of persons in custody, and during military operations in the Northern Sinai Peninsula,” the report says, adding that Egyptian security forces killed “at least 1,000” in one day when they cleared two Islamist sit-ins on Aug. 14, 2013.

“The government has not held accountable any individual or government entities for violence associated with the clearing operations,” the report continues, adding, “Impunity remains a serious problem.”

Merna Thomas contributed reporting.

A version of this article appears in print on June 8, 2015, on page A6 of the New York edition with the headline:
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 33805


« Reply #375 on: June 30, 2015, 10:49:11 AM »




Police in Cairo on Monday inspected the wreckage of a convoy carrying Egypt’s top prosecutor, Hisham Barakat, who was killed by the attack.
Publish Date June 29, 2015. Photo by Hatem Safwat/European Pressphoto Agency.


CAIRO — A powerful bomb killed Egypt’s top prosecutor as he drove to work Monday morning, broadening the violent insurgency against the government that militants have been waging for two years.

The prosecutor, Hisham Barakat, was the most senior official to be killed in Egypt since the insurgency began in 2013, after the military ousted the country’s first freely elected president, Mohamed Morsi of the Muslim Brotherhood.

Gen. Osama Bedeir, chief of security here in Cairo, said the bomb was in a car parked along Mr. Barakat’s route and was probably detonated by remote control. The apparently sophisticated mode of attack foiled security measures that were meant to protect Mr. Barakat, who had repeatedly received death threats.


The daylight assassination of so senior a figure was a blow to President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi, who rose to power on a promise to restore stability after years of political tumult. His government has justified a broad crackdown against Islamists and other opponents as necessary to eradicate the threat from militants.


This month, militants carried out separate attacks near the Pyramids at Giza and the Karnak temple in Luxor, two of Egypt’s most popular tourist destinations, further denting the government’s efforts to project order.  Monday’s attack appeared to set Egypt on a course for more violence. The killing of Mr. Barakat was seen as likely to embolden the militants while prompting an even more forceful response from the security services.  There was no immediate claim of responsibility.

As one of the nation’s most prominent judicial officials, Mr. Barakat was a focal point for militant groups vowing retaliation for the prosecutions of hundreds of Islamists and the death sentences handed down against senior Brotherhood leaders, including Mr. Morsi.

Many of Mr. Barakat’s prosecutions had also been criticized by human rights advocates, who said the cases were built on flimsy evidence and politically motivated charges.

An Egyptian jihadist group affiliated with the Islamic State — one that has killed judges in the past — posted a video Sunday that appeared to threaten more attacks against the judiciary. The group, which calls itself the Sinai Province, included images that appeared to show an attack in May that killed several judges; fighters are seen spraying a minibus with machine-gun fire.

The three-minute video also included brief images of several other prominent judges, including one who sentenced Mr. Morsi to death.

But analysts said the bombing on Monday might have been the work, instead, of one of a number of militant groups that have surfaced in the last year with smaller-scale attacks. The emergence of these groups, with names like Revolutionary Punishment, have added to longstanding fears in Egypt that Islamists and other opponents of the government would turn to violence in response to the government’s crackdown.

The rise of the new groups coincided with a shift in the insurgency’s focus: After nearly two years of attacks mainly against the security services, killing hundreds of soldiers and police officers, the militants have broadened their targets to include civilian officials in the judiciary.

“This was something that was a long time in the making,” said Mokhtar Awad, a researcher at the Center for American Progress in Washington who studies Egyptian Islamist groups. “The groups that I classify as non-jihadist violent Islamists have always had, at the center of their discourse, the issue of retribution. It was clear that police officers were No. 1 on their list, but eventually, this had to include judges.”

The explosion on Monday hit Mr. Barakat’s small convoy around 10 a.m. as it left the Heliopolis neighborhood near Cairo International Airport. The force of the blast set several cars on fire and shattered windows along the street, injuring at least eight people.

Egyptian officials initially said that Mr. Barakat’s wounds were not life-threatening and included bruises to his face and a dislocated shoulder. Later, the Health Ministry said Mr. Barakat had suffered a lacerated liver and died in the hospital from internal bleeding.

The explosion raised troubling questions about the government’s security measures, which failed to protect one of its most vulnerable officials even though militants had attempted similar attacks before. In September 2013, Mohamed Ibrahim, who was interior minister at the time, survived a bomb attack on his convoy in Cairo.

Ahmed Shazly, who lives near the site of the latest bombing, said Mr. Barakat appeared to follow the same routine every morning, leaving for work in a two-vehicle convoy, one of them apparently an armored vehicle.

In a statement on Monday, Mr. Sisi praised Mr. Barakat as a “model of judicial integrity” who “exemplified patriotism and diligence.” The government said it was canceling celebrations planned for Tuesday to commemorate the start of the mass protests that preceded Mr. Morsi’s ouster.
Logged
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
Power User
*****
Posts: 33805


« Reply #376 on: July 16, 2015, 05:07:06 PM »

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3163910/Terror-high-seas-Egyptian-navy-vessel-erupts-huge-fireball-ISIS-carry-rocket-strike-patrol-ship-Mediterranean.html
Logged
Pages: 1 ... 6 7 [8] Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!