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Author Topic: Training for "puppies"  (Read 3683 times)
Gayle S.
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« on: July 08, 2003, 01:31:21 AM »

What do the Dog Brothers have to say about combat/self defense training for "puppies"?  

I am thinking of the person who works 40 plus hours a week, wants to spend most of his or her free time with family and friends and is in only average or above average physical condition.

As someone who works in healthcare my most comfortable analogy is heart disease.  The Dog Brothers are training to be Cardiac Surgeons but in day to day life (for most people) a 4 - 8 hour American Heart Association basic CPR/automatic defibulator course is what is most useful and practical.  

Do the brothers have any thoughts on what kind of training would be the combat equilivant of a CPR course?

As an end and sort of aside high intensity combat training does have a useful and pratical application.  It is not likely that I will need to defend myself from bad guy nijas falling from the sky.  I do happen to live in a nation where the number 1 killer is cardioivascular disease.  Spending a few hours a week conditioning for combat will protect my heart and blood vessels from the "real" killer.

Thank you for your time and I would be interested in Dog Brother  thoughts on self defense for the general public.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #1 on: July 08, 2003, 04:48:20 PM »

Woof Gayle:

  An excellent question.

  Currently I am running around chasing my tail and getting ready for our Training Camp and the DB Gathering of the Pack on Sunday and so, for the moment, my answer must be brief.

  There are "the Dog Brothers"- "a band of sweaty, smelly, psychopaths with sticks" (ssps) and there is "Dog Brothers Martial Arts".  DBMA is dedicated to practitioners, such as yourself, as well as to "ssps".  

  DBMA tests itself (techniques, attribute development, training methods, etc) in the context of DB Gatherings, but its goal is to "help you walk as a warrior for all your days".   In short, our mission is to help you the Practitioner.

  In this context, there are specific areas of the system aimed at self-defense applications.

  More on this next week.

Woof,
Guro Crafty
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Gayle S,
Guest
« Reply #2 on: July 09, 2003, 03:03:24 AM »

I will keep an eye out for you answer; thanks for the quick response.

I proably need to come up with a better term than "puppy training".

Gayle Stanfill Jr.
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Stickgrappler
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"...grappling happens. It just does." - Top Dog


« Reply #3 on: July 09, 2003, 02:37:50 PM »

Quote from: Gayle S,

I proably need to come up with a better term than "puppy training".

Gayle Stanfill Jr.


actually, i think with the dog motif, "puppy training" is apt smiley
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"A good stickgrappler has good stick skills, good grappling, and good stickgrappling and can keep track of all three simultaneously. This is a good trick and can be quite effective." - Marc "Crafty Dog" Denny
bruiseseasily
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« Reply #4 on: July 09, 2003, 03:33:02 PM »

Hey Gayle,

I am interested in the answer to your question and will keep looking for Crafty's reply.  
However, let me suggest that you pick up a set of the first video tapes while you wait.  IMO they are a great training tool for a "puppy" like myself.  When I ordered them, I was a little worried that they wouldn't be useful since I will likely never fight at the intensity of real contact .  I am glad that I took the risk since I really like the tapes.
The training on the tapes are mostly stuff you can do on your own and I have found (just in the couple of weeks I have had them) that there are some really nice drills.  I get a good work out running through them and practicing with some contact on a BOB (Body Opponent Bag).  It has also helped the Kali that I do in my JKD class immensly.  Some of the drills on closing have impacted my empty hand sparring as well.
The tapes do a great job of explaining why something is important and showing through fight footage how it really plays out, so I feel like I get a lot of the advantage of others experience with real contact even if I  never train to that level.  While real contact experience would probably make things soar in comparison, I feel I get a lot out of the tapes for limited amount I put in.  More importantly, I am really enjoying the training since I feel secure that the techniques have been tested out the hard way (as an ex-boxer/kick boxer, keeping things real is important to me).  
I have no affiliation with the Dog Brothers (never even met one), so I hope you will take this in the spirit it is given.  I am glad you asked your question and look forward to Crafty's reply so that I can think of other ways to work DBMA into my training.
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Gayle S.
Guest
« Reply #5 on: July 11, 2003, 11:15:10 PM »

Thanks for the insight Brusieseasily.  

I enjoyed intense training when younger and would like to do so again.

When I was 20 someone could break one of my ribs and I would have to sit out a round or two.

When I hit 30 a bruised rib would stop me from working about a week.

I'm now 45 and  got a splinter from one of me sticks the other day; I think I am going to hold off on watching the videos until the injury heals.

Puppy Gayle
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #6 on: July 25, 2003, 02:29:48 PM »

Woof Gayle et al:

  Tail wags for the kind words Bruiseseasily.

  Turning now to Gayle's question:

Dog Brothers Martial Arts (DBMA) has as its mission to help people "walk as a warrior for all their days".  To succeed, it must offer real answers to people such as Gayle- people we call "Practitioners".

DBMA says Fit, Fun, Functional.  In other words, training the art must lead to good health.  Indeed, a death from heart disease is more likely than a death by stickfight, especially if one does not stickfight.  Smiley  The system must be Fun to train, or otherwise one will stray from the path.  And it must be Functional.  The cultivation of functionality over the years in a fun way that develops health.

Where to begin?

As far as Functionality goes, DBMA looks to begin with primal power issues first.  If you can hit hard and deal with primal shots, you will always be to be reckoned with.  We think we can get people to this level pretty quickly-- and at the same time lay a foundation for continued growth in developing someone who is "warrior for all his days".

  Example:  Our use of Krabi Krabong.  The drills are very "simple" which allows them to be learned quickly.  This simplicity and the confidence it brings that everyone is going to be clear on what to do allows them to be practiced with increasing power and vigor until a desired aerobic level of intensity is attained.  No "tippy tap magic wands" here!  The aerobic work is achieved not by droning along on a a) stairmaster b) precor c) stationary bicycle d) jump rope e) etc. but by putting on the tunes, and proceeding to bang and sweat.  Get used to hitting and blocking hard and fast while moving hard and fast-- and get in some good aerobic work and satisfying stress discharge (also good for health!).  Have a good time letting loose.   As an added benefit KK movement also is closely related to that of its sport off-shoot known as Muay Thai-- thus important gross motor motions for unarmed fighting are developed at the same time.

When one reaches the point of diminishing returns, it is time to move to other areas until it is time to come back to this one again.  One of the very nice things about the FMA is the way that one can move between different areas (empty, stick, sticks, knife/knives, staff, unarmed, etc) and stay fresh through out life and that training in any given area also generates results in the others -  someone who trains smart can develop tremendous synergy , , ,

Does this begin to answer you question Gayle?  

Woof,
Guro Crafty
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Howling Dog
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« Reply #7 on: April 09, 2005, 09:13:28 AM »

Woof Guro Crafty, Iam sure this has probably come up on more than one occasion and i looked for a specific thread pertaining, but could not find one.
I have had this burning question. To nut shell it .....What does it take to make "DOG BROTHER"?
I know that there are progressive ranks along the path IE:dog, c-dog and dog brother.
Iam under the impression that fighting in the gatherings IS a requirement please correct me if iam wrong......I however dont believe this is the onley requirement.
What else do you look for in choosing and advancing guys along the path of becomming a full on "dog brother"
Hope this is taken and asked in the respectful manner in which it was intended. TIA for your time and consideration.
                                                    TOM
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Howling Dog
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« Reply #8 on: April 10, 2005, 12:02:24 AM »

Gayle S

IMHO - Your question shows a very good understanding of combat vs standard martial arts.

I'll tell you what I have taught my kids (who show very little interest in commenting themselves to my martial art):

1 - Learn when someone is too close.  That line where someone can hit you before you can move is further out than you think.  Running away is always good.  It's about surviving not winning.

2 - Learn to cover-up/block strikes.  This includes reaching out and touching the striking arm.  That simple interference will take a lot of power out of most strikes.

3 - Learn elbow and knee strikes.  Remember, in order to make these strikes work, the bad guy has to be close enough to you to smell his breath.  If it's come to this - hit hard, fast, and again and again and again.

I hope it's close to what you were looking for.
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I don't know how many of them it would have taken to whip my ass, but I knew how many they were going to use. That's a handy little piece of information.
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http://ironpunk.blogspot.com/
argyll
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Posts: 43


« Reply #9 on: April 19, 2005, 12:53:46 PM »

Quote from: tom guthrie
Woof Guro Crafty, Iam sure this has probably come up on more than one occasion and i looked for a specific thread pertaining, but could not find one.
I have had this burning question. To nut shell it .....What does it take to make "DOG BROTHER"?
I know that there are progressive ranks along the path IE:dog, c-dog and dog brother.
Iam under the impression that fighting in the gatherings IS a requirement please correct me if iam wrong......I however dont believe this is the onley requirement.
What else do you look for in choosing and advancing guys along the path of becomming a full on "dog brother"
Hope this is taken and asked in the respectful manner in which it was intended. TIA for your time and consideration.
                                                    TOM



I found this information (and more) at http://dogbrothers.com/wrapper.php?file=faq.htm

Quote

QUESTION: What does it take to become a Dog Brother?

Although many of the Dog Brothers have come out of DBIMA or DBMA instructors, this is NOT necessary in order to become a Dog Brother. If you wish to become a Dog Brother, fight at some of the Gatherings, let the Brothers get to know you, and find someone in the group to present your name to Crafty Dog, Top Dog, or Salty Dog-- by biological reality, the "council of elders"-- and they will take it from there.

The first level is "Dog" one is accepted into the tribe. The next level is "Candidate Dog Brother". At this point, one is showing the level of realization in fighting that we expect of a "Dog Brother". A name is tentatively given. Typically, we look for this level to be maintained for at least three Gatherings. Then one reaches the grand exalted status of "Dog Brother".




Hope that helps.

Best regards,

Argyll
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Howling Dog
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« Reply #10 on: April 19, 2005, 02:39:38 PM »

Woof Argyll,  Thanks for the info!!
                                Tom
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Howling Dog
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