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| | |-+  Non-violence as a strategy
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Author Topic: Non-violence as a strategy  (Read 610 times)
Crafty_Dog
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« on: March 05, 2013, 09:20:49 PM »

GM, BD, et al please feel free to engage here on this very interesting point.

I'll help kick things off by wondering where the Palestinians would be if they had chosen the NV route with Irsrael , , ,
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G M
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« Reply #1 on: March 05, 2013, 09:41:39 PM »

Where would would Europe's Jews be if they used non-violent resistance to the nazis? Perhaps the allied troops at Normandy should have thrown down their rifles and peacefully protest the nazi war machine into compliance.

I ordered the book, but I'm not expecting much by ivory tower idiocy.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #2 on: March 05, 2013, 09:49:08 PM »

I credit BD with sufficient IQ to realize that NV is not the answer to all problems , , ,
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G M
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« Reply #3 on: March 05, 2013, 09:54:40 PM »

The fact that the book cites the "palestinians" as having used non-violence is a big clue.  rolleyes
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bigdog
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« Reply #4 on: March 05, 2013, 10:01:30 PM »


I ordered the book...

Thanks, GM.

I don't think its perfect by any means, but it is good. And impactful (again, see the CV).
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bigdog
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« Reply #5 on: March 05, 2013, 10:02:28 PM »

I credit BD with sufficient IQ to realize that NV is not the answer to all problems , , ,

And I don't.

But we can begin with thread, too, by noting Gandhi and King.
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G M
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« Reply #6 on: March 05, 2013, 10:10:20 PM »

If Gandhi and King were facing Stalin, Pol Pot, Hitler or any other ruthless totalitarian, they'd be just another bit of human remains in another mass grave, forgotten to history.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #7 on: March 05, 2013, 10:51:14 PM »

I suspect we are all in agreement on that! cheesy
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bigdog
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« Reply #8 on: October 27, 2013, 05:51:46 AM »

http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2013/10/24/the_dissidents_toolkit

From the article:

Attracting participation is perhaps the most important of these tasks, since the ability to provoke defections and outmaneuver opponents often depends on whether the movement enjoys large and broad-based support. The most important singular factor for a successful campaign is its participation rate. According to the NAVCO data set, which identifies the outcomes of over 300 nonviolent and violent campaigns worldwide from 1900-2006, none of the cases failed after achieving the active and sustained participation of just 3.5 percent of the population -- and some of them succeeded with far less than that. Of course, 3.5 percent is nothing to sneeze at. In the United States today, this constitutes over 11 million people. But how do movements get this large in the first place, especially in countries where overt participation in a mass movement is highly risky?

One way organizers can grow their movement is by including tactics that are safer and therefore more attractive to risk-averse participants. For example, instead of relying solely on demonstrations or protests, many movements will allow people to participate through "electricity strikes" where people shut off their electricity at a coordinated time of day, or by banging on pots and pans in the middle of the night to signal the power in numbers. Engaging  in these types of actions may draw in more ambivalent people while also allowing them the opportunity to develop a sense of identity with the movement and its goals. In Chile under Pinochet, for example, outright demonstrations against the dictator were far too dangerous. In one instance, Pinochet was so threatened by the subtext of some popular songs that he banned public singing; it didn't take much. But when people began to bang on pots and pans, it let them demonstrate their defiance anonymously in the safety of their own homes. As the people's metallic clamor for change became louder and louder, anti-Pinochet organizers and their supporters became emboldened to press for more disruptive and overt action.
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