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Author Topic: Merry Christmas!  (Read 685 times)
Crafty_Dog
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« on: December 23, 2013, 01:11:43 PM »

http://patriotpost.us/pages/290

To All my Christian Friends--Merry Christmas and happy holidays to everyone else.
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G M
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« Reply #1 on: December 23, 2013, 02:04:51 PM »

http://patriotpost.us/pages/290

To All my Christian Friends--Merry Christmas and happy holidays to everyone else.

Ditto
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #2 on: December 24, 2013, 10:46:12 AM »

“How many observe Christ's birth-day! How few, his precepts! O! 'tis easier to keep Holidays than Commandments.” –Benjamin Franklin (1743)
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DougMacG
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« Reply #3 on: December 24, 2013, 11:01:33 AM »

Yes, it was once a religious celebration more than a retail event.  Merry Christmas everyone.  I hope that Christmas offers a moment of family time, good tidings and cheer for those here of all faiths!
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #4 on: December 24, 2013, 12:11:47 PM »

In Hoc Anno Domini
This editorial was written in 1949 by the late Vermont Royster and has been published annually since.

Dec. 23, 2013 5:40 p.m. ET

When Saul of Tarsus set out on his journey to Damascus the whole of the known world lay in bondage. There was one state, and it was Rome. There was one master for it all, and he was Tiberius Caesar.

Everywhere there was civil order, for the arm of the Roman law was long. Everywhere there was stability, in government and in society, for the centurions saw that it was so.

But everywhere there was something else, too. There was oppression—for those who were not the friends of Tiberius Caesar. There was the tax gatherer to take the grain from the fields and the flax from the spindle to feed the legions or to fill the hungry treasury from which divine Caesar gave largess to the people. There was the impressor to find recruits for the circuses. There were executioners to quiet those whom the Emperor proscribed. What was a man for but to serve Caesar?

There was the persecution of men who dared think differently, who heard strange voices or read strange manuscripts. There was enslavement of men whose tribes came not from Rome, disdain for those who did not have the familiar visage. And most of all, there was everywhere a contempt for human life. What, to the strong, was one man more or less in a crowded world?

Then, of a sudden, there was a light in the world, and a man from Galilee saying, Render unto Caesar the things which are Caesar's and unto God the things that are God's.

And the voice from Galilee, which would defy Caesar, offered a new Kingdom in which each man could walk upright and bow to none but his God. Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me. And he sent this gospel of the Kingdom of Man into the uttermost ends of the earth.

So the light came into the world and the men who lived in darkness were afraid, and they tried to lower a curtain so that man would still believe salvation lay with the leaders.

But it came to pass for a while in divers places that the truth did set man free, although the men of darkness were offended and they tried to put out the light. The voice said, Haste ye. Walk while you have the light, lest darkness come upon you, for he that walketh in darkness knoweth not whither he goeth.

Along the road to Damascus the light shone brightly. But afterward Paul of Tarsus, too, was sore afraid. He feared that other Caesars, other prophets, might one day persuade men that man was nothing save a servant unto them, that men might yield up their birthright from God for pottage and walk no more in freedom.

Then might it come to pass that darkness would settle again over the lands and there would be a burning of books and men would think only of what they should eat and what they should wear, and would give heed only to new Caesars and to false prophets. Then might it come to pass that men would not look upward to see even a winter's star in the East, and once more, there would be no light at all in the darkness.

And so Paul, the apostle of the Son of Man, spoke to his brethren, the Galatians, the words he would have us remember afterward in each of the years of his Lord:

Stand fast therefore in the liberty wherewith Christ has made us free and be not entangled again with the yoke of bondage.
« Last Edit: December 24, 2013, 04:24:49 PM by Crafty_Dog » Logged
bigdog
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« Reply #5 on: December 24, 2013, 02:56:19 PM »

Merry Christmas to all.

[youtubehttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d9H9Fi4Qcus][/youtube]
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #6 on: December 25, 2013, 10:59:52 PM »

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fgm_dh2a31Q
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ccp
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« Reply #7 on: December 26, 2013, 10:00:10 AM »

http://gma.yahoo.com/video/miracle-mutt-namath-family-dog-120439800.html

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ccp
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« Reply #8 on: December 26, 2013, 10:10:51 AM »

Joe Namath's daughter dog found years later now is his grand daughter's pet.

http://gma.yahoo.com/video/miracle-mutt-namath-family-dog-120439800.html

Another free associative thought:

It is interesting she met with the dog's finder at Yeehaw Junction.  The only thing there is basically a bar/tavern at I believe the junction of three crossroads in Central Florida.

Jupiter would I think be Southeast.

I used to pass through there when I travelled in the mid to late 90's doing hospital consulting.  One time I finally thought I would just this once stop at the bar and go in and have a beer.  So I did.  I am sitting in this dingy bar and the only two other people if I recall correctly were the bartender and an older lady who was standing by the restrooms.

As I sipped my beer ( a light weight - I guess - real beer drinkers guzzle) I looked around and all of a sudden out of the restroom walks out possibly the most beautiful 20 something year lady I have ever seen.  She walked right past me and the lady who I would hazard a guess was her mother walked behind her and they both left.  Perhaps they stopped at the junction to use the restroom. 

Dare I say the bartender and I challenged the range of motion of our necks as our fixated eyes turned our heads nearly clear off our shoulders.

I actually wrote a song about it on the way home.  I don't know if Katherine still has it.

It also reminds me of the scene in the movie Citizen Kane where the older gentlemen recalls seeing a woman in a white dress for only a few seconds. Yet for the rest of his life he remembers it like it was five minutes ago.

Anyway when I hear Yeehaw Junction that it was I think of.
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DougMacG
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« Reply #9 on: December 26, 2013, 10:27:55 AM »

Audio link, 6 minute intro, 2 hour broadcast, beautiful music with a little narration, PBS national broadcast:

http://americanpublicmedia.publicradio.org/www_publicradio/tools/media_player/popup.php?name=minnesota/classical/features/2012/12/17/st_olaf_christmas_festival_20121217_128

101 year music tradition at my daughter's college, this was my first time attending.   Full symphony with 5 choirs, 600 students performing on a campus of less than 3200.

http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2013/11/12/st-olaf-christmas-festival
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #10 on: January 01, 2014, 12:42:44 PM »

Most Jews Wish You a Merry Christmas
Tuesday, Dec 24, 2013
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As a Jew, and a religious one at that, I want to wish my fellow Americans a Merry Christmas.

Not “Happy Holidays.” Merry Christmas.

I write, “my fellow Americans” because, as reported by the Pew Research poll released just last Wednesday, nine in 10 Americans say they celebrate Christmas.

Apparently, many Americans have forgotten that Christmas is not only a Christian holy day, but also an American national holiday. Just as we wish one another a “Happy Thanksgiving” or a “Happy Fourth,” so, too, we should wish fellow Americans a “Merry Christmas.”

It doesn’t matter with which religion or ethnic group you identify; Christmas in America is as American as the proverbial apple pie. That is why some of the most famous and beloved Christmas songs were written by guess who? Jews.

“White Christmas” was written by Irving Berlin (birth name: Israel Isidore Baline).

“Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer” — Johnny Marks.

“Let It Snow! Let It Snow! Let It Snow!” — composed by Jule Styne, lyrics by Sammy Cahn.

“Silver Bells” — by Jay Livingston (Jacob Harold Levison) and Ray Evans (Raymond Bernard Evans).

“The Christmas Song (Chestnuts Roasting on an Open Fire)” — Mel Torme and Robert Wells (Robert Levinson), both Jews.

“Sleigh Ride” — lyrics by Mitchell Parish (Michael Hyman Pashelinsky).

There are many others as well.

The notion that non-Christians are excluded is absurd.

Americans who feel “excluded” are not excluded. They have decided to feel excluded. Which is, of course, entirely their right to do; no one forces anyone to celebrate any American holiday. But attempts to remove Christmas from the public sphere are destructive to our society. It would be as if Jehovah’s Witnesses attempted to remove public celebrations and references to the Fourth of July because they don’t celebrate national holidays.

Why are these attempts destructive? Because the entire society — Jews, Muslims, Hindus, Buddhists, atheists as well as Christians — all benefit from the goodness and joy that the Christmas season engenders.

It never occurred to my Orthodox Jewish family not to enjoy this season. It was a tradition in our home to watch the Christmas Mass from the Vatican every Christmas Eve (unless it was a Friday evening, and therefore the Sabbath, when no television watching was allowed). Had you visited our home, you would have seen my mother — and my father, my brother and I all wearing our kippot (Jewish skullcaps) — watching Catholics celebrate Christmas.

Nor did it ever occur to my brother, Dr. Kenneth Prager, an Orthodox Jew, not to sing Christmas songs when he was a member of the Columbia University Glee Club. He happily sang not only secular Christmas songs, but religious Christ-centered Christmas songs as well.

So when and why did this pernicious nonsense of non-Christians being “excluded” by public celebration of Christmas develop?

It is nothing more than another destructive product of the 1960s and ’70s when the left came to dominate much of the culture.

One way in which the left has done this has been through “multiculturalism,” the left’s way of dividing Americans by religion, ethnicity, race, and national origins.

The other way has been through its aim of secularizing America — which means, first and foremost, the removal of as many Christian references as possible.

The left regularly mocks the notion that there is a war against Christmas, a description that left-wing writers almost place within quotation marks, as if it is a manufactured falsehood.

The most obvious and ubiquitous example of this war is the substitution of “Happy Holidays” for “Merry Christmas” almost throughout the culture. Employees in most retail operations are told not to say “Merry Christmas.” As a result, in much of America today, wishing a stranger “Merry Christmas” is almost an act of courage.

And, of course, many, if not most, public schools have banned Christmas trees and the singing of any Christmas song that hints of Christianity. Last week, for example, the school choir at a Long Island school, the Ralph J. Osgood Intermediate School, sang “Silent Night” with the lyrics changed. “Holy infant,” “Christ the savior” and “Round yon virgin, mother and child” were all deleted.

Let me end where I began: speaking as a Jew.

Overwhelmingly, the Jews who are active in the removal of Christmas from society — such as Mikey Weinstein, the anti-Christian activist (with a soft spot for Islamists) who led the campaign to remove the manger scene from Shaw Air Force Base in South Carolina — are not religious Jews. They are animated by one or both of two factors: One is leftism, which serves as a substitute religion for Judaism (and among many non-Jews for Christianity). The other is a psychological need to see Christianity suppressed; many people who have little or no religious identity resent those who do.

According to Fox News, Weinstein’s Military Religious Freedom Foundation “said they were alerted by an undisclosed number of Airmen who said they were emotionally troubled by the sight of [the nativity scene].” That sentence should be reworded. Those who claim to be emotionally troubled by the sight of a nativity scene are not emotionally troubled by the sight of a nativity scene. They are emotionally troubled.
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