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Author Topic: Mental state  (Read 2170 times)
Swordfight
Guest
« on: February 05, 2004, 11:04:09 AM »

Hello, All!

I have seen the video clips & the photo gallery of the Dog Brothers & I can see that the committment of the participants in the sport is second to none.

I've just started learning arnis.  During sparring training, the moment I have my helmet on, sof stix in my hand & my opponent is in front of me, my state of mind is that he is about to kill me & I cannot allow that.  We are holding real swords & losing is not an option.

This state of mind pushes me to become agressive to a point where, when he hits me hard, I try to hit him harder.  He evades my strikes fast & I try to evade his faster.  After one sparring, my partner & I assessed what has transpired & we analyzed the outcome of the fight.

He told me that I tend to hit too hard when the sparring heats up.  I apologized to him because I really don't know if I am already hitting too hard.  My lack of proficiency (we were sparring w/in the skills we have acquired so far) I guess affects the amount of power I send out.  I also explained that it's probably because when I spar I think of my opponent as an enemy who is bent on killing me & the only option I have is to do everything to stay alive.  He said that maybe I should be more concerned w/ the process of the fight - that not that the opponent hit me, but that I didn't execute the block properly.  While I personally believe this is something that should be addressed in drill training, I can't put myself to believe the same should be said in sparring - w/c I treat as the real training for real fighting.

So my question is, is it right that my state of mind during a fight/spar is that the opponent is someone who is going to kill me & therefore I should not hold back on my aggressiveness DURING the fight?  What is your state of mind when you fight or spar?

I really need the answers as this will ultimately help in my pursuit of becoming a good FMA practitioner.  Thanks for any help.
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Swordfight
Guest
« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2004, 11:07:22 AM »

I also forgot to write down that my partner also told me that I tend to emulate (even w/o saying anything & just fighting) a sense of competitiveness because of my state of mind.  Is this good?
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sln78
Newbie
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Posts: 15


« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2004, 11:58:10 AM »

I don't have experience stick fighting, but I am an amatuer kickboxer(about 16 amatuer fights - kickboxing/muay thai).  
I'm sure that the experience is pretty much the same, so here is what I think.  Thinking of your opponent as the enemy isn't necessary, or good.  It often makes you tense up, and makes for a bad sparring partner.  When you spar, you are not there to kill your opponent - You are there to work with eachother.  
I thought the same way as you did when I first started kickboxing.  However, many Friday nights spent sparring in the ring, allowed me to get experience, and be able to calm down.  
You don't need to think the guy is going to kill you to be able to compete.  You need to practice and be in shape.  I think the key ingredients to fighting in any sport  are stamina, heart, and skill.  You need all three of those put together.
I don't care how much you hate you opponent, or think he is going to kill you, if your in the third round of a fight and your so tired you can't lift your arms or throw a kick, your going to get knocked out.
Also, no matter how hard and intense you spar in the ring, it will never compare to an actual ring fight or street fight.
Hope this helps.  Smiley
 - Sandon
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Swordfight
Guest
« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2004, 12:38:29 PM »

Thanks, Sandog!

So based on your answer & what I am experiencing, is it fair then to say that the reason for my state of mind is that I am a still a novice?  So does this mean that this state of mind will change as I grow into this martial art?  Does everybody go through this phase?
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sln78
Newbie
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Posts: 15


« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2004, 01:08:21 PM »

I'm speaking for myself on this one, but I believe that the goal is to stay as relaxed as possible.  Being able to do this comes from experience.
Remember that sparring is for gaining experience, learning, and practicing for the real thing.  Try to remain calm, and not to get your addrenaline pumping - work with your partner and practice your techniques.
I'm going to relate this to kickboxing.  If you are in the ring sparring, and you have your partner against the ropes - throw two or three hard punches, then back up, relax, let your partner regain his composure, and continue to work.  There will be times when you spar harder than others, but remember, the goal it to work and learn.
 - Sandon
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Anonymous
Guest
« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2004, 01:15:26 PM »

Thank you, Sandog.

I will try to keep this in mind.  And you're right, my adrenaline must be pumping everytime I spar w/ anyone.  This is something I have to learn to control.

Again, thank you, sir.
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crimresearch
Newbie
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Posts: 20


« Reply #6 on: February 05, 2004, 01:49:17 PM »

Training has to be taken as training...if we want to advance beyond the point we are at today.
Just re-enacting a life or death situation in your mind, and applying your current skills as though it were the street, is IMHO a limited training method, although there comes a time where training should deal realistically with adrenaline pumping. taking a hit, etc.

Notice that people who train for combat firearms don't *start* their training by opening up on everyone else at the pistol range... shocked There are intermediate steps.
Train your hard hitting separately from your defensive maneuvers, separately from your offensive tactics, and so on...then integrate them into what you would do with a real attacker.


FWIW
Paul Nunis
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"Take away paradox from the thinker, and you have a professor"

Soren Kierkegaard
Anonymous
Guest
« Reply #7 on: February 05, 2004, 02:28:49 PM »

Thanks for the response, Paul!

Now I am understanding it better.  Hopefully I'll learn a lot more as I continue to practice & attend my trainings.

Your responses are invaluable.
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