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Crafty_Dog
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« on: April 08, 2005, 01:51:21 AM »

Subject: Coca-Cola vs Water
Date: Thursday, April 07, 2005 3:16 AM

WATER

* 75% of Americans are chronically dehydrated.

* In 37% of Americans, the thirst mechanism is so weak that it is
often mistaken for hunger.

* Even mild dehydration will slow down one's metabolism as much as 3%.

* One glass of water will shut down midnight hunger pangs for almost
100% of the dieters studied in a University of Washington study.

* Lack of water is the #1 trigger of daytime fatigue.

* Preliminary research indicates that 8-10 glasses of water a day
could significantly ease back and joint pain for up to 80% of sufferers.

* A mere 2% drop in body water can trigger fuzzy short-term memory,
trouble with basic math, and difficulty focusing on the computer screen or
on a  printed page.

* Drinking 5 glasses of water daily decreases the risk of colon cancer
by 45%, plus it can slash the risk of breast cancer by 79%, and one is 50% less likely to develop bladder cancer.

Coca-Cola:


* In many states (in the USA), the highway patrol carries two gallons
of coke in the truck to remove blood from the highway after a car accident.

* You can put a T-bone steak in a bowl of Coke and it will be gone in
two days.

* To clean a toilet: Pour a can of Coca-Cola into the toilet bowl and
let the "real thing" sit for one hour, then flush clean. The citric acid in
Coke removes stains from vitreous China.

* To remove rust spots from chrome car bumpers: Rub the bumper with a
rumpled-up piece of Reynolds Wrap aluminum foil dipped in Coca-Cola.

* To clean corrosion from car battery terminals: Pour a can of
Coca-Cola over the terminals to bubble away the corrosion.

* To loosen a rusted bolt: Applying a cloth soaked in Coca-Cola to the
rusted bolt for several minutes.

* To bake a moist ham: Empty a can of Coca-Cola into the baking pan,
wrap the ham in aluminum foil, and bake. Thirty minutes before the ham is finished, remove the foil, allowing the drippings to mix with the Coke for a sumptuous brown gravy.

* To remove grease from clothes: Empty a can of coke into a load of
greasy clothes, add detergent, and run through a regular cycle. The
Coca-Cola will help loosen grease stains.

* It will also clean road haze from your windshield.

 

For Your Info:

* The active ingredient in Coke is phosphoric acid. Its pH is 2.8. It will dissolve a nail in about 4days. Phosphoric acid also leaches calcium from bones and is a major contributor to the rising increase in
osteoporosis.

* To carry Coca-Cola syrup (the concentrate) the commercial truck must
use the Hazardous material place cards reserved for Highly corrosive
materials.

* The distributors of Coke have been using it to clean the engines of
their trucks for about 20 years!
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2005, 10:54:04 AM »

http://www.snopes.com/cokelore/acid.asp
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EdwardsNH
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« Reply #2 on: April 09, 2005, 08:06:14 AM »

Quote from: Crafty_Dog
Subject: Coca-Cola vs Water
Date: Thursday, April 07, 2005 3:16 AM

WATER

* 75% of Americans are chronically dehydrated.

* In 37% of Americans, the thirst mechanism is so weak that it is
often mistaken for hunger.

* Even mild dehydration will slow down one's metabolism as much as 3%.

* One glass of water will shut down midnight hunger pangs for almost
100% of the dieters studied in a University of Washington study.

* Lack of water is the #1 trigger of daytime fatigue.

* Preliminary research indicates that 8-10 glasses of water a day
could significantly ease back and joint pain for up to 80% of sufferers.

* A mere 2% drop in body water can trigger fuzzy short-term memory,
trouble with basic math, and difficulty focusing on the computer screen or
on a  printed page.

* Drinking 5 glasses of water daily decreases the risk of colon cancer
by 45%, plus it can slash the risk of breast cancer by 79%, and one is 50% less likely to develop bladder cancer.

Coca-Cola:


* In many states (in the USA), the highway patrol carries two gallons
of coke in the truck to remove blood from the highway after a car accident.

* You can put a T-bone steak in a bowl of Coke and it will be gone in
two days.

* To clean a toilet: Pour a can of Coca-Cola into the toilet bowl and
let the "real thing" sit for one hour, then flush clean. The citric acid in
Coke removes stains from vitreous China.

* To remove rust spots from chrome car bumpers: Rub the bumper with a
rumpled-up piece of Reynolds Wrap aluminum foil dipped in Coca-Cola.

* To clean corrosion from car battery terminals: Pour a can of
Coca-Cola over the terminals to bubble away the corrosion.

* To loosen a rusted bolt: Applying a cloth soaked in Coca-Cola to the
rusted bolt for several minutes.

* To bake a moist ham: Empty a can of Coca-Cola into the baking pan,
wrap the ham in aluminum foil, and bake. Thirty minutes before the ham is finished, remove the foil, allowing the drippings to mix with the Coke for a sumptuous brown gravy.

* To remove grease from clothes: Empty a can of coke into a load of
greasy clothes, add detergent, and run through a regular cycle. The
Coca-Cola will help loosen grease stains.

* It will also clean road haze from your windshield.

 

For Your Info:

* The active ingredient in Coke is phosphoric acid. Its pH is 2.8. It will dissolve a nail in about 4days. Phosphoric acid also leaches calcium from bones and is a major contributor to the rising increase in
osteoporosis.

* To carry Coca-Cola syrup (the concentrate) the commercial truck must
use the Hazardous material place cards reserved for Highly corrosive
materials.

* The distributors of Coke have been using it to clean the engines of
their trucks for about 20 years!




Ok Ok... While I'll agree, most people aren't drinking enough water, and while I personally won't drink soda (unless it's the only thing around, and I just need a sip to wash something down), some of this stuff sounds like "Internet folklore"

"* Lack of water is the #1 trigger of daytime fatigue."  I would have to most certainly disagree, and say Americans are extremely sleep deprived.  That would be the #1 Trigger

Also, I would love to see someone try making a T-bone disapear in a bowl of Coke in two days.

And one more point... All the comments about Coke being used as a cleaning agent, and being high on the acid scale... So?

That's a common "new age" medicine tactic, to point out something you eat can be used for something else, and for some reason it gets a reaction from people.  Personally, I don't get it.  A lot of healthy foods can be used for other things too.

As far as the acid level... Even if Coke could disolve a steak in two days, your stomach acid will disolve it in hours.  Does that mean we should all use enough stomach antacid to neutralize the acid in our stomachs?

"Phosphoric acid also leaches calcium from bones and is a major contributor to the rising increase in
osteoporosis."

Now this actually makes a statement directly corelating the product to one's health.  It also has enough research behind it that it's worth considering true.  This is why I personally don't drink soda.

"
* In 37% of Americans, the thirst mechanism is so weak that it is
often mistaken for hunger.
"

Interesting... I'd like to see how they got that number, but I know it to probably be true in my own case.  I eliminateed snacking by reaching for a glass of water when I feel "snacky".  I only eat when hungry now.


Troy

ps - Sorry if my tone sounds a bit "acidic".  I'm still a little bitter that the UFC and Dogbrothers, showed at least 85% of what I learned and taught to be worthless  Cheesy   Geesh... It's a good thing I'm young enough to start over.

I also worked in a health food store for about a year, and constantly heard some of the strangest logic used for poor arguementation of a products efficacy.  "Sharks don't get cancer, so if I eat shark cartilage, I won't get cancer"  Yes, I actually heard that said.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #3 on: April 09, 2005, 08:40:11 AM »

Internet folklore?

Did you see my second post?  Tongue  wink
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EdwardsNH
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« Reply #4 on: April 09, 2005, 08:49:05 AM »

ROFLMAO

OK, Now I have... Can someone help me get this egg off my face Cheesy
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Greenman
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« Reply #5 on: April 10, 2005, 05:11:53 PM »

The Mythbusters on the Disovery channel actually  recently (last 9-12 months) debunked some of these Coke myths, while also proving some (chrome cleaner=true).
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the way OUT is THROUGH
Guard Dog
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« Reply #6 on: April 12, 2005, 10:30:16 AM »

Greenman,
  They also did the removal of blood from a road which proved to work!

Gruhn
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Ryan “Guard Dog” Gruhn
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Dog Brothers Martial Arts Association
"Smuggling Concepts Across the Frontiers of Style”
ryan@dogbrothers.com | www.dogbrothers.com
Greenman
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« Reply #7 on: April 14, 2005, 08:36:59 PM »

Depending on the level of combatant ferocity at the next gathering, maybe Guro Crafty would do well to invest  in a 50 gallon drum of Coke to wash the life juice from the ground!   cheesy
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #8 on: April 14, 2005, 09:23:01 PM »

That is funny.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #9 on: April 15, 2005, 10:44:49 AM »

Too Much Water Gets Runners in Trouble
Dangerously low blood salt levels found in many marathoners

By Ed Edelson
HealthDay Reporter

WEDNESDAY, April 12 (HealthDay News) -- Marathon runners who gulp down too much water during a tough race are doing their bodies no favors, researchers report.

A new study of competitors in the 2002 Boston Marathon found too many drank excessive amounts of water during the grueling 26-mile race, causing their blood salt levels to dip to potentially dangerous levels in a condition called hyponatremia.

In fact, one runner in that marathon, a 28-year-old woman, died from hyponatremia after finishing the race.

Although runners usually cited a fear of dehydration as the reason for their excessive water intake, the study "showed that there is a point where drinking too much can be critical," said lead researcher Dr. Christopher S.D. Almond, a pediatric cardiology fellow at Children's Hospital Boston. His team report their findings in the April 14 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Almond and his colleagues enrolled 766 marathoners in their trial and got blood samples from 488 of them at the finish line. Of those, 62 had abnormally low blood salt levels -- three of them low enough to be called "critical."

Abnormally low salt levels were more common in women (37 of 166, or 22 percent) than men (25 of 322, or 8 percent). Many of the affected runners drank more than three liters of water during the race, enough to raise their body weight despite the more than 26 miles they ran.

Based on that sample, 1,900 of the nearly 15,000 Boston Marathon runners that year had hyponatremia, Almond estimated.

Thinner runners -- those with a body mass index of about 20 -- were more likely to end up with low salt levels, the study found. That might help explain the higher incidence among women, Almond said, since it's believed women runners tend to drink as much water as men, even though their average weight is lower.

A racing time of more than four hours was also associated with abnormally low blood salt levels, the researchers reported.

Hyponatremics were not the champion runners, who completed the course in about two hours, noted Dr. Benjamin D. Levine, a professor of medicine at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas, and co-author of an accompanying editorial.

"Really fast people don't have time to drink water," Levine said. "The slower the athlete, the greater the risk, and the predominant reason for that behavior is that you have more time to drink."

Up to a point, drinking water during a race makes sense, Levine said. "These people are not idiots," he said. "They are following rules that say you have to drink a lot of water to stay ahead of your thirst. But athletes lose water at different rates and lose salt at different rates, so the general rule may not apply to an individual."

Detailed guidelines about water intake during long-distance races have been issued by USA Track & Field, an organization that covers the subject in depth, Levine said. Serious runners who build their lives around racing tend to be aware of those guidelines, he said.

For less devoted racers, "using your thirst as a guideline may be the best way to handle it," Levine said. "Don't worry about getting a little dehydrated. Drink if you are thirsty, but don't drink for the sake of drinking."

Almond said his study was not designed to produce recommendations about avoiding problems caused by excess water intake, but simply to make runners aware that those problems exist.

"If I could say one thing over and over, it would be safety, safety, safety," Almond said.

More information

Water intake guidelines for athletes are set out by USA Track & Field.



SOURCES: Christopher S.D. Almond, M.D., pediatric cardiology fellow, Children's Hospital Boston; Benjamin D. Levine, M.D., professor, medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and Presbyterian Hospital, Dallas; April 14, 2005, New England Journal of Medicine

Copyright ? 2005 ScoutNews LLC. All rights reserved.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #10 on: September 23, 2005, 07:23:46 AM »

Cancer and Vitamins:
Patients Urged to Avoid
Supplements During Treatment
September 20, 2005; Page D1

Many cancer patients take a range of antioxidant vitamins in hope of improving their odds, but research suggests the supplements may be doing more harm than good.

A report published this month in CA, an American Cancer Society medical journal, says cancer patients shouldn't use antioxidants during radiation or chemotherapy because the supplements may reduce the effectiveness of treatment. Worse, some research suggests that antioxidants may actually feed cancers, protecting the very cancer cells patients are trying to attack.

  HEALTH MAILBOX



 
Read Tara Parker-Pope's Health Mailbox where she answers readers' questions about medical studies, ailments and treatments.
 
 
 
The news further clouds the role that vitamins play in promoting good health. Earlier this year, a major study showed that certain people who regularly take vitamin E supplements had a higher risk for heart failure. The notion that antioxidants may be harmful is likely to be upsetting and confusing to the large number of cancer patients gobbling down vitamins and supplements to help fight the disease. Studies show that as many as a third to half of cancer patients are taking antioxidants, vitamins and other supplements.

Antioxidants include beta-carotene, lycopene, and vitamins A, B, C and E, among others. In the body, antioxidants mop up rogue molecules called free radicals, which have the potential to cause extensive cell damage and are believed to play a role in heart disease, cancer and numerous other health problems.

A substance that attacks free radicals would seem to battle cancer in theory. But the results of both lab and human studies of cancer and antioxidants have been mixed. One concern is that because chemotherapy treatments sometimes act against the cancer by producing free radicals, taking antioxidants could interfere with that effect.

 
Some lab studies have shown that antioxidants can improve the effectiveness of cancer treatments, such as a 1997 study that showed antioxidant supplements boosted chemotherapy used for colon-cancer patients. Other lab studies raise questions about their use, however. For instance, a 1995 report in the Journal of Biological Chemistry showed that cancer cells in a petri dish actually absorb more vitamin C than normal cells, suggesting that vitamin C is better at protecting tumors than healthy tissues.

Until more is known, patients undergoing treatment should avoid high-dose supplements, concludes Gabriella M. D'Andrea, breast oncologist at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and author of the CA article.

In her review of the scientific evidence on use of antioxidant supplements to prevent or treat cancer, Dr. D'Andrea found a handful of human trials that showed supplements often don't benefit cancer patients and may be causing harm.

"We would love to find a nutrient or antioxidant that could be anticancer, but I think we need to be very cautious," says Dr. D'Andrea. "In fact we've seen the counter," she adds, "where cancer rates are higher."

For instance, two randomized trials of patients with advanced cancer found no benefit from vitamin C supplements and suggested that survival may have been worse in the vitamin group. Two large trials of smokers and former smokers found that beta carotene supplements appeared to increase lung-cancer risk. Last year, the British medical journal Lancet published a study showing that antioxidants didn't prevent gastrointestinal cancers, and may have increased mortality risk. In a 2002 study of early-stage breast-cancer patients undergoing treatment, some were prescribed large doses of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. Results weren't conclusive but suggested survival may be worse in the antioxidant users.

A major study this year of patients at risk for heart disease showed high doses of vitamin E had no impact on risk of melanoma, prostate, lung, oral, colorectal or breast cancers, but they were linked with higher risk for heart failure. A separate vitamin E study showed head-and-neck-cancer patients who took the supplement increased their risk for developing a second cancer.

Dr. D'Andrea says a large human trial is needed to show the real impact vitamins and antioxidants have on cancer patients. The problem is that such trials are expensive, and it's notoriously difficult to study supplements because dietary patterns vary so widely and issues like fat content and fruit and vegetable consumption may alter the way one supplement acts in different people.

Certainly, none of this means cancer patients should never take vitamins or other supplements. Many cancer patients suffer nutrition problems and may be advised to take vitamins. The main concern is that patients discuss diet changes with their doctor. "A lot of people think nutrients in any dose are harmless, but that may not be the case," says Marji McCullough, nutritional epidemiologist for the American Cancer Society. "It's probably prudent to say people should avoid taking large doses of any single supplement unless specifically recommended to do so from their doctor."

Patients still may be able to help themselves by adopting a lifestyle of healthful eating and exercise. In May researchers released the results of a study of 2,400 post-menopausal women with early-stage breast cancer. The study showed that a low-fat diet can lower the chances of the cancer coming back by 24%.

? E-mail me at healthjournal@wsj.com.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #11 on: December 15, 2005, 06:15:55 AM »

I admit to being surprised to reading in the last couple of days about an apparently sound study showing that there was not much difference between 15 grams and 30 grams of fiber a day with regard to colon cancer.   Apparently there were good effects with regard to heart and susceptbility to diabetes.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #12 on: April 17, 2010, 01:14:28 PM »

Cooking the Health Out of Your Food?


New research from Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City suggests it’s not only what you eat but how hot you cook it that matters. Subjecting certain foods to prolonged high heat -- not only for frying, but also for grilling, roasting, broiling or baking -- creates toxic, inflammatory particles. These, in turn, cause the oxidation and inflammation in the body that are associated with such diseases as diabetes, heart disease, kidney disease, Alzheimer’s disease and others.

Called advanced glycation end products (AGEs), these toxic particles adhere to the arteries, kidneys, brain and joints, where they heighten inflammation. Our typical Western diet, heavy on meat and processed foods and light on plant-based foods, is believed by many scientists to contain at least three times more AGEs than is considered safe.

Good News from this Study

It’s always exciting when research reveals a way to avoid a common health problem -- and this new study does just that. According to the researchers, you can achieve dramatic and quick benefit -- within just days -- by reducing your intake of AGE-containing foods. Doing this decreases the body’s level of inflammation and helps restore its defenses against disease.

The study divided 350-plus participants into three groups -- healthy adults between the ages of 18 and 45, an older healthy group, all past age 60,and nine patients with chronic kidney disease (the kidneys are believed to be especially sensitive to AGEs). Participants were randomly assigned to eat either a regular Western diet in which foods were grilled, fried, or baked (in other words, loaded with AGEs) or what the researchers called "the AGE-less diet," which included the same foods, only poached, boiled or steamed so that they contained only about half as many AGEs. The two diets were similar in calories and nutrients. After four months, all participants on the AGE-less diet showed a 60% decline in blood levels of AGEs as well as in several other inflammation markers. According to the study’s lead author, Helen Vlassara, MD, professor and director of the division of experimental diabetes and aging at Mount Sinai, this indicates that your actual chronological age may not be as significant a factor in aging and health as the AGEs in your food. A finding that’s even more impressive: The patients with kidney disease had a similarly substantial reduction after just one month on the AGE-less diet.

The Heat Is On...

I asked Dr. Vlassara to explain to me how the AGEs get into foods. They develop as a chemical reaction when heat is combined with protein and different sugars, she said -- and she noted that meat-rich diets are especially bad, since meats contain high levels of easily oxidizable fat and protein.

There is a third point that is crucial to understand -- which is that removing all visible fat when you cook meats doesn’t solve the problem. All cells in meats contain not only fat and proteins, but also sugars -- some more reactive than others. Therefore, exposure to high heat will still cause AGEs to form in meat at much higher levels than in starch even if you cut away the visible fat. In fact, Dr. Vlassara told me that when you see meat brown while cooking, what you’re witnessing is the rapid reaction among proteins, fats and those reactive sugars to the heat. And, since they are also animal products, when they are cooked, full-fat milk and cheese also develop high levels of AGEs.

Even worse, manufacturers often add AGE-containing flavor-enhancers or coloring (such as caramel) to processed and packaged foods. You may be surprised to learn that a major offender in this category is dark-colored soda. Generally speaking, fast foods and processed/packaged foods also tend to be high in AGEs, which gives us yet another reason to avoid them.

Avoiding AGEs

The good news is, it’s not all that difficult to reduce the amount of AGEs in your diet, Dr. Vlassara said. It just requires making some modest changes in the way you prepare food. Her suggestions...

Meats

Marinate in an acid-based mixture (such as vinegar or lemon juice) before cooking, which helps reduce the amount of AGEs produced by heat. Note: Avoid marinades containing sugar, such as most barbecue and teriyaki sauces.
Aim to serve meats rare to medium rare if possible -- for instance, cooking pork to just beyond pink. This is admittedly a balancing act -- you want to cook as briefly as possible to minimize development of AGEs, but undercooking carries its own set of dangers.
To achieve a brown finish to meats, Dr. Vlassara suggests cooking on your stovetop with a cover to conserve moisture, and then placing the meat under the broiler for just a few minutes at the end.
Use as little fat as possible -- as Dr. Vlassara points out, even healthy olive oil oxidizes at high heat.
Water inhibits the formation of AGEs, so poaching, stewing, steaming, or even boiling proteins is best (including fish and eggs).
Dairy and Other Foods

Avoid bringing dairy products to high temperatures -- for instance, when using milk in sauces or when melting cheese under a broiler. Dr. Vlassara said the less time these foods cook, the better. She added that lower temperatures are preferable, as is increased distance from the heat source.
Brief microwaving produces a lower level of AGEs than broiling, grilling, or stovetop cooking, so this is a great way to cook liquids.
Plant-based proteins also create dangerous levels of AGEs when subject to very high heat for long periods -- so be aware that there are dangers to even seemingly healthy foods like broiled tofu or roasted nuts.
What about restaurant food?

Fortunately, the increasingly popular Mediterranean Diet uses lots of foods with low AGEs (including fruits, vegetables, beans and whole grains), so it once again ranks among the healthiest ways that you can eat. This not only provides a good framework for eating at home, it also suggests a wide variety of delicious, healthful, low-AGE dishes that you can order in restaurants. But Dr. Vlassara noted that cooking even these foods at high heat with low hydration is problematic, so there’s no way around it -- cooking at high temperatures is not so hot for your health.


Source(s):
Helen Vlassara, MD, is professor of geriatrics, medicine and molecular medicine, director, division of experimental diabetes and aging, department of geriatric and palliative medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York City.
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5RingsFitness
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« Reply #13 on: May 03, 2010, 07:05:17 AM »

an interesting aside perhaps on the water/coke thread

carbonated soda is the number one selling beverage in the US
heartburn and inflammation drugs are the best selling otc meds in the US

hfc/citric acid vs. water

hmmmmmm
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"Nations have passed away and left no traces, And history gives the naked cause of it - One single simple reason in all cases; They fell because their peoples were not fit."-Rudyard Kipling
Jonobos
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« Reply #14 on: May 03, 2010, 09:44:09 PM »

Too Much Water Gets Runners in Trouble
Dangerously low blood salt levels found in many marathoners

I have devised a very slick way around this! My roommate is an avid mountain biker and does a race called the 'wilderness 101.' It is a 101 mile race in the middle of the summer so dehydration is a real problem. Although he knew about the issue of low salt/potassium levels associated with this sort of activity he struggled with a way to deal with it. He played with pickle juice, and sports drinks, but found none of them to his liking. I suggested soy sauce. This may sound gross, but it is a perfect use for all those extra packets that come with your take out/delivery Chinese food! He claimed it worked wonders! Its a small enough gulp that he didn't even need to get off his bike for it, and he could carry a bunch of them without significant added weight!

Jon
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5RingsFitness
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« Reply #15 on: May 07, 2010, 12:02:47 PM »

I wonder if Bragg's liquid aminos would offer a double benefit
considering the soy comment

I like Endure, its an electrolyte product you put in water

water is still my drink of choice, then single malt, or mothership whit
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"Nations have passed away and left no traces, And history gives the naked cause of it - One single simple reason in all cases; They fell because their peoples were not fit."-Rudyard Kipling
Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #16 on: May 07, 2010, 04:53:15 PM »

We now interrupt this thread for some irrelevant and irreverant humor:

WC Fields: "Water? NEVER!  Fish fcuk in it!"

Carry on!
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G M
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« Reply #17 on: September 16, 2010, 07:58:52 PM »

Anyone tried eating like a caveman? Thoughts?
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maija
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« Reply #18 on: September 18, 2010, 09:01:12 AM »

A friend of mine has started the 'caveman' diet. He's a very active, physical guy, trains alot. Says he feels very good on it and that it's totally stopped his acid reflux issues, which I guess were a problem for him especially at night.
Around here you can do deals with small family farms that raise grass fed cattle to buy whole animals. It arrives in a big box, cut up and frozen. Makes eating cheaper, and healthier.
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Karsk
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« Reply #19 on: September 20, 2010, 12:22:15 AM »

I have been eating like this for about 80% of my diet.  Prior to this I ate lots of protein. Prior to that I ate mostly vegetarian with some chicken and fish.  Prior to that I ate like crap Smiley


I had high cholesterol and some health issues when I ate like crap.  Mostly vegetarian I had to work at keeping the weight off...lots of complex carbs.  Eating lots of protein and staying away from high cholesterol foods...my blood stats were good.  Eating primal but still minimizing cholesterol I had ridiculously good blood stats.  I am now allowing myself to eat more cholesterol to see what happens.  So I am eating meat, fish, poultry, veggies, nuts, fruit, dried stuff....and I have one bowl of oatmeal every day.  Feel great. Less inflammation.  I will have blood stats done prior to Christmas.

Karsk
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stilljames
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« Reply #20 on: October 01, 2010, 08:52:32 PM »

I haven't tried the caveman diet.  These days, I am mostly vegetarian supplemented by fish and poultry in small amounts.  I find that works best for my endurance.  A medication that I have been on for the last year makes it uncomfortable for me to digest red meat, so I avoid that these days.  Before that, I'd use it in moderate doses when I was working on power at the gym for a few months.  I'm another person who ate like crap.  And then really ate like utter crap and got up to 287 pounds.  These days, I try to hang out in the low 170s.  I find that's a generally good weight for myself.  Plus, when I'm competing, it is a good weight that lets me easily play in my choice of about 3 weight divisions easily without affecting my game too much.

My general advice is to try different diet patterns that follow LOGIC until you find the one that works for you.  I'm constantly tweaking mine in small ways as I study more and try to dial in things.  My overall plan follows an 80/20 rule.  I try to eat healthy 80 percent of the time during a given week and then not just go hog wild in the other 20.  My biggest monitoring point is to watch my calorie intake.  I try to keep my breakdown generally as follows:  20-30 percent fat.  30 percent protein and the rest in carbs.  I modify both the total calorie limit and the carbohydrate percentage based on the activities of the day.  I also listen to my body.  If my body says that it needs more calories, then I give it to it in small doses.  I generally eat 6-8 small meals and snacks in a day. 

In addition to feeling better, sleeping better and having more energy, I am the one male in my family in 3 generations who has not had to be on blood pressure medicine by 30.  When I was heavy and ate like crap it had hit 150/100 and was climbing.  It's usually around 125/80 these days. Another thing that I have found is that I can get by on far fewer calories.  By expenditure tables, I should need 4000 or so calories on most days.  But I find that more than about 2500 or so and I tend to put on weight. That goes back to LOGIC and paying attention.  Don't be afraid to modify other peoples advice, even if they do have degrees after their name, if something does not work after an honest effort.  Nobody else has your exact genetic composition.  It's a lifelong process but what else have we got to do with our time? *grin*

The biggest thing I find to be important is to always listen to the body and be able to determine the difference between a want and a need.  I may WANT Breyer's Ice Cream.  What I probably need is some unbleached rice with a tablespoon of honey or some yogurt.  That's the other bit of advice I can give:  If you decide to snack on something unhealthy but delicious, then do it right.  Instead of the crappy cheap donut go to a real bakery and get a freshly made donut done by a real pastry chef.  One, it will taste better.  Two, the better ingredients probably won't do as much glue-like damage to your system.

That was a trick that I picked up in my hard drinking days:  If I am going to pickle my liver, I might as well do it on something that is pleasant to drink.

I will finish with a commentary on something I've discovered recently.  A thought on why most (but not all by any means)  genuine mystics in pursuit of enlightenment seem to end up as skinny aesthetics at some point.  Leaving out the lessening of desire, it is purely practical.  I've found that when I am really, really deeply into relaxation and meditation, it is very disconcerting to feel your digesting food making turns in your intestines.
« Last Edit: October 02, 2010, 05:03:42 AM by stilljames » Logged
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