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Author Topic: Conditioning  (Read 17224 times)
VTach
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« on: May 23, 2005, 01:37:32 PM »

My empty hand practice includes a lot of conditioning. We do Muay Thai Shin Kicks to the inner and outer legs, strikes to the shins, Shin Kicks to the abdomen, and knees to the upper arms and legs from the plum. Other training includes ball of the foot kicks to hard objects, smashing our forearms together and Shin Kicks or punches to the forearms.

I'm not naturally tough, but I'm able to take some pretty decent hits thanks to those drills.

Assuming an up an coming Dog can't take a hit from a stick very well (me), how do you get him ready for his first Gathering? I'll admit I'm a bit confused about how hard people are actually suppose to be swinging. Is it really full contact or is there a "no wind" rule? Can you guys take those hits out of pure meanness and adrenalin, or do you condition ahead of time?

Peace,
John
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When my opponent expands, I contract. When my opponent contracts, I expand, and when there is an opportunity, I do not hit, the hit comes... all by itself. - Bruce Lee
Howling Dog
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« Reply #1 on: May 23, 2005, 03:32:17 PM »

Woof VTAC, I will take a stab at your question, and hope that others will also. I have been to two gatherings so my experience is limited to say the least. I watched in my first and fought in my second.
My suggestion would be to work alot on footwork(mobility) and defense like your roof blocks and that kinda thing. Idea being....be mobile to get out of the way of whizzing sticks and defense to block any that you cant get out of the way of! shocked Reason being, at the gatherings its all out and they hit very very hard no holding back, that is of course unless you have your opponent hurt then you obviously dont want to send him to the hospital. Though that happens too........
Train with some light weight sticks or padded sticks type stuff, it will still probably hurt and that will give you some idea what to expect. Adrenalin fear and all that happy intense stuff will carry you a long way.
These guys are great and they will bring you right in. Theres a great sense of comaradrie among them ,so i recommend you do it.
Besides if you get there and  decide its a bit much no one will say the less of you if you decide not too fight. Its all good and a great time. Not to mention a great learning and growing experience. Go for it!
                                       Tom
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Howling Dog
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« Reply #2 on: May 26, 2005, 07:14:51 AM »

John,
  I have found that adrenalin is my best friend when fighting.  In my last tournament I took a good amount of hits from the other guys stick and I only really remember feeling one of them.  I honestly believe that when weapons are involved no matter what the weapon is, there is no way to condition the body to getting hit by them.  While I do believe to a certain extent that the body does "harden" I also belive that there is a limit to how far it can go.  

Gruhn
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Ryan “Guard Dog” Gruhn
Dog Brothers Martial Arts Association
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ryan@dogbrothers.com | www.dogbrothers.com
Tony Torre
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« Reply #3 on: April 13, 2006, 11:02:07 AM »

John,

We also do a lot of impact conditioning, much the same way you do, and with medicine balls.  I truly believe this helps.  Tom and Ryan both have great points as well.  Skill and mindset are both very important parts of the equation.  It also helps to be in great shape, you'll tolerate more and recover faster.

Tony Torre
Miami Arnis Group
www.miamiarnisgroup.com
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TomFurman
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« Reply #4 on: April 13, 2006, 06:18:16 PM »

Don't beat yourself to death. Medicine balls are fine. There are plenty of old timers living on Advil. Look at a Thai's shin after growing up as a fighter. Keep your joints healthy and stay mobile and reduce inflammation with diet. If you can't see your abdominals,...you're fat. Get lean and work on footwork. Train to last your whole life,...not be an aging crippled has been.

--Tom Furman www.physicalstrategies.com
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #5 on: March 02, 2010, 12:59:45 PM »

Woof All:

I began preparing for a tracking course in 8 weeks.  The course will entail wearing about 45 pounds for many miles over very uneven terrain, so I have begun acclimating myself to hiking with weight.  Thanks to my wife helping me find my weight vest yesterday, today I was able to use my weight vest.

I did only 3.3 miles, all barefooting in my Vibram VSOs.

Mile 1: natural
 Mile 2: 25 lbs.
Mile 3: 50 lbs:

I wear a watch with a pulsemeter and was surprised at how little the weight affected my pulse.

The Adventure continues!
CD
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sting
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« Reply #6 on: March 02, 2010, 02:44:09 PM »

I prefer a more gradual method for weight acclimation.  Get yourself a newborn and one of those "Instant Domesticator" baby harnesses.  Start with a newborn of about nine pounds.  It would be better if they ramped up the weight more gradually, but they seem to grow much faster and hit 20 lbs in the first six months.  Squats and split squats will help raise the pulse.  For interval training, grab a second baby, such a two year-old, and carry both.

Seriously, sticks are dangerous, but it's not as bad as it looks.  Observe "empty handed" training on a heavy bag.  You see people slam the bag and never miss.  The same person in a ring lands only the rare good blow.  As others have recommended, learn to use a roof/cross block for closing (you are attacking) and a DeQuerdas (medium range) style hand-reinforced block for defense.  (To cover angle #1, stick tip up, weapon-bearing hand at chest level, empty hand (thumb towards body) behind stick to reinforce at 1/2 or upper 1/3.  The important point is to position stick to cross (maximal intersection) #1 angle.  That positioning is effective ableit somewhat uncomfortable without 10,000+ repetitions.  Both of those blocks have worked well for me in sparring and at Gatherings, although I'll have to admit that I needed to be hit very hard in order to learn the proper positions - something years of drills in class will not teach.
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Baltic Dog

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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #7 on: March 03, 2010, 08:15:00 AM »

 grin

Here is a routine someone recommended to me:
===========

_______________ preparatory training program. This program is physically and mentally

demanding. To accomplish physical-related goals set by ----, applicants must be in good physical

condition upon arrival at ---------. Soldiers attending the ---- Program will perform physical

tasks that will require them to climb obstacles (by use of a rope) 20 to 30 feet high, swim while

in uniform, and travel great distances cross-country while carrying a rucksack with a minimum of

50 pounds. The ---- Program requires upper and lower body strength and physical endurance

to accomplish daily physical-oriented goals on a continuous basis for 24 days. Below is a recommended

5-week PT program consisting of realistic physical and mental goals relative to physical

requirements set by the ---------- ---- committee (if you have time, work out more than 5

weeks prior to arrival).

4-3. Stages of physical fitness. Attaining physical fitness is not an overnight process; the body

must go through three stages:

a. The first is the toughening stage, which lasts about 2 weeks. During this time the body

goes through a soreness and recovery period. When a muscle with poor blood supply (such as a

weak muscle) is exercised, the waste products produced by the exercise collect faster than the

blood can remove them. This acid waste builds up in the muscle tissue and irritates the nerve in

the muscle fiber causing soreness. As the exercise continues, the body is able to circulate the

blood more rapidly through the muscles and remove the waste material, which causes soreness to

disappear.

b. The slow improvement stage is second stage in attaining physical fitness. As the body

passes through the toughening stage and continues into the slow improvement stage, the volume

of blood circulating in the muscle increases and the body functions more efficiently. In the first few

weeks the improvement is rapid, but as a higher level of skill and conditioning is reached, the

improvement becomes less noticeable. The body reaches its maximum level of performance between

6 and 10 weeks. The intensity of the program and individual differences account for the

variance in time.

c. The sustaining stage is the third stage during which physical fitness is maintained. It is

necessary to continue exercising at approximately the same intensity to retain the condition developed.

4-4. Physical workouts. Physical workouts should be conducted a minimum of 4 days a week;

work out hard one day, easy the next. A hard and easy workout concept will allow maximum effort

for overloading both the muscle groups and cardiorespiratory system; it will also prevent injury and

stagnation in the program. For example: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday--Hard workouts (overloading

of muscles) (Saturday used for extra long workouts). Sunday, Tuesday, and Thursday--

Easy workouts. This is the time to practice swimming and work on overall fitness; sprints, pull-ups,

push-ups, and especially stretching.

a. Prior to each workout, 10 to 15 minutes should be devoted to performing stretching exercises.

Additionally, the ----------- Surgeon recommends a well-balanced diet be incorporated

with this recommended PT program and that daily fluid (water) intake be increased.

4-1

---------------------

b. Week 1. (Only hard workout days are listed here. Make up your own workouts on your

“easy” days.)

(1) Day 1: See what you can do. Do the best you can do.

(a) APFT (maximum performance in all events, see what you can do).

(b) One hundred-meter swim (nonstop, any stroke, do not touch the side or bottom of the

pool).

(c) Forced march with 30-pound rucksack, 3 miles in 45 minutes (along a road) or 1 hour if

cross-country. (Wear well broken-in boots with thick socks.)

(2) Day 2:

(a) Three sets of push-ups (maximum repetitions in one-half minute period).

(b) Three-mile run (moderate 8- to 9-minute mile pace).

(c) Rope climb or three sets of pull-ups (as many as you can do).

(d) Forced march with 30-pound rucksack, 5 miles in 1 hour and 15 minutes (along a road) or

1 hour and 40 minutes (cross-country).

(3) Day 3: Forced march with 30-pound rucksack, 5 miles in 1 hour and 15 minutes (along

the road) or 1 hour and 40 minutes (cross-country).

c. Week 2.

(1) Day 1: Repeat of day 3, week 1 (forced march), extend distance to 8 miles with 35-

pound rucksack in 2 hours (along a road) or 2 hours and 40 minutes (cross-country).

(2) Day 2:

(a) Three sets of push-ups, pull-ups, sit-ups (maximum repetitions in 35-second period three

times).

(b) Run 5 miles (moderate 8- to 9-minute mile pace).

(c) Three sets of squats with 35-pound rucksack (50 each set). Go down only to the point

where the upper and lower leg forms a 90-degree bend at knee.

(3) Day 3: Forced march with 35-pound rucksack, 10 miles in 3 hours (along a road) or 4

hours (cross-country).

d. Week 3.

(1) Day 1:

(a) Four sets of push-ups, pull-ups, and sit-ups (maximum repetitions in 40-second period).

(b) Run 4 miles (fast to moderate 7- to 8-minute mile pace.)

4-2

--------------------------------

(c) Four sets of squats with 40-pound rucksack.

(2) Day 2: Forced march 12 miles with 40-pound rucksack in 4 hours (along a road) or 4

hours and 40 minutes (cross-country).

(3) Day 3:

(a) Four sets of push-ups, sit-ups, pull-ups (maximum repetitions in 45-second period).

(b) Run 6 miles (fast to moderate 7- to 8-minute pace).

(c) Four sets of squats with 40-pound rucksack.

e. Week 4.

(1) Day 1: Forced march 14 miles with 50-pound rucksack in 4 hours (along a road) or 4

hours and 40 minutes (cross-country).

(2) Day 2:

(a) Four sets of push-ups, sit-ups, and pull-ups (maximum repetitions in 1-minute period).

(b) Run 6 miles (fast to moderate 7- to 8-minute mile pace).

(c) Four sets of squats with 50-pound rucksack.

(3) Day 3: Forced march 18 miles with 50-pound rucksack in 4 hours and 45 minutes (along

a road) or 6 hours (cross-country).

f. Week 5.

(1) Day 1:

(a) Run 3 miles (fast 6- to 7-minute mile pace).

(b) Five hundred-meter swim (nonstop, any stroke, but not on your back).

(2) Day 2: APFT. You should be able to achieve a score of at least 240 (minimum of 70

points in any one event) in the 17 to 21 year age limit. If not, work out harder.

(3) Day 3: Forced march 18 miles with 50-pound rucksack in 4 hours and 30 minutes (along

a road) or 6 hours (cross-country).

4-5. Considerations.

a. For forced marches, select boots that are comfortable and well broken-in (not worn out).

Wear lightweight fatigues and thick socks (not newly issued socks). Army issue boots are excellent

if fitted properly.

b. Utilize map and compass techniques whenever possible during forced march cross-country

workouts.

c. Insoles specifically designed to absorb shock will reduce injuries.

4-3

------------------------

d. Practice proper rucksack marching and walking techniques:

(1) Weight of body must be kept directly over feet, and sole of shoe must be flat on ground

taking small steps at a steady pace.

(2) Knees must be locked on every step in order to rest muscles of the legs (especially when

going uphill).

(3) When walking cross-country, step over and around obstacles; never step on them.

(4) When traveling up steep slopes, always traverse them; climb in zigzag pattern rather

than straight up.

(5) When descending steep slopes, keep the back straight and knees bent to take up shock

of each step. Dig in with heels on each step.

(6) Practice walking as fast as you can with rucksack. Do not run with a rucksack. When

testing, you may have to trot to maintain time, but try not to do this during training, it may injure you.

(7) A good rucksack pace is accomplished by continuous movement with short breaks (5

minutes) every 6 to 8 miles.

( If you cannot ruckmarch, then do squats with your rucksack. (One hundred repetitions,

five times or until muscles fatigue.)

e. On each day (not listed in training program) conduct less strenuous workouts such as

biking and short or slow runs. To complement push-up workouts, weight lifting exercises should

be included (for development of upper body strength) in easy day workout schedule. Swim as

often as you can (500 meters or more).

f. Once a high level of physical fitness is attained, a maintenance workout program should be

applied using the hard and easy workout concept. Once in shape, stay in shape. Do not stop this

5-week program. If you have met all the goals, then modify program by increasing distance and

weight and decreasing times. Be smart, don’t injure yourself.
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Maxx
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« Reply #8 on: March 03, 2010, 11:47:59 PM »

Thats a Army Special Forces Training. Im pretty sure..When I went though Ranger Training I saw some of that.
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Rarick
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« Reply #9 on: March 04, 2010, 07:51:47 AM »

Average grunt/leg infantry type of conditioning.  This stuff is moving beyond the basic workouts done in boot/basic to get base conditioning for passing the PFT/ AFT.  None of the timed humps are done, and are done in regular sweat gear.   If you are wanting to up your pulse, start shortening your time goals or do intervals.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #10 on: March 05, 2010, 10:33:52 PM »

Maxx:  Yes, it is-- I redacted it when I posted it because I didn't know at the time that it was public info that it was SF.

R:  In addition to the aerobic conditioning, I need to prep my ability to carry weight on my upper body, and do hills for a goodly number of miles.
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Rarick
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« Reply #11 on: March 06, 2010, 04:56:21 AM »

There goes your neck......you may not look like a linebacker, but you will probably develop those weightlifter bumps at the base of your neck, also do not be surprised if you get a few back of the head headaches.  New muscles growing on either side of your neck, reinforcing the column of the spine, will cause adjustments.   I had some real nasty headaches when I went thru SOI once upon a time ago.  The only excersises that you can do in the gym that I recall are standing presses with the bar behind your head/neck.  wearing the weight vest all the time is a good idea too, but remember the Pack is going to change your center of gravity.  Do some footwork with a 20-35 lbs. pack on...........
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #12 on: March 06, 2010, 05:24:28 AM »

I have already experienced in a small way the changes in the center of gravity.  You make a good point about training to get used to this.  Maybe I will begin with some lateral lunges , , ,
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #13 on: March 06, 2010, 03:46:27 PM »

Thursday:  3.3 miles with 50 pounds

Today, another 3.3 miles with 50 pounds.

Average pulse mile 1: 97
AP #2: 103
AP #3: 111

5.30 minutes per 1.1 miles

The original plan was to go 4.4 miles but with only one day's rest the muscles of my upper back we saying it was enough for the day. My next session will have two days rest so I will bump it up to 4.4 miles then.

I do like the way the weight vest is teaching me things about posture and gait. Today I was noticing that carrying the vest was easier the more I opened the thoracic region of the spine (think scapula down, rhomboids activated, pec minor released, thumbs parallel, heart chakra open) In conjunction with maintaining each foot on the ground longer subtly improves hip alignment and counter swinging the shoulders (e.g. right shoulder forward on left step) diminishes heel strike. Now the hips roll nicely and I start opening up the hip flexors.

Still my pace is slow (about 5.40 per 1.1 miles).  Someone advised me to have longer strides.  For me this seems to really increase heel strike. Am I doing something wrong?
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Rarick
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« Reply #14 on: March 07, 2010, 09:22:24 PM »

it sounds like you are doing it about right. relatively quiet upper body so the load doesn't pound you silly and working the lower body/ core as suspension/propulsion.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #15 on: March 07, 2010, 11:05:09 PM »

I'm looking to bump up my distance and/or heart rate on Tuesday.
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Rarick
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« Reply #16 on: March 09, 2010, 04:07:05 AM »

3Mph times 8 hours  should give you an idea of range.  although you could try and force it to 5Mph for heart rate I would look at getting the "regular" pace down  for the endurance.  Camping and other chores also take energy, not to mention you have to be able to keep up with whatever you are tracking..........
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #17 on: March 09, 2010, 06:06:42 AM »

I have been told to be capable of 4-12 miles a day for 5 days over very uneven terrain.  We will be returning to a home base, probably a ranch, every night.

I see I have reported a major glitch.  My 1.1 mile time is NOT 5:30.  Hell my one mile time in high school was 6:00 and that was without any weight!  The dirt loop on which I have been doing my work is .28 (hence the weirdness of reporting increments of 1.1 miles) and everytime I pass my truck I have a piece of paper and a pen on the windshield wiper which I use to jot down my data (number of laps, pulse) as I go by.  The 5.30 is a rough approximation of my time for the .28 of each lap.  Overall I am averaging just over 3 miles per hour. 
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Glewis007
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« Reply #18 on: March 09, 2010, 12:21:55 PM »

I have been told to be capable of 4-12 miles a day for 5 days over very uneven terrain.  We will be returning to a home base, probably a ranch, every night.

I see I have reported a major glitch.  My 1.1 mile time is NOT 5:30.  Hell my one mile time in high school was 6:00 and that was without any weight!  The dirt loop on which I have been doing my work is .28 (hence the weirdness of reporting increments of 1.1 miles) and everytime I pass my truck I have a piece of paper and a pen on the windshield wiper which I use to jot down my data (number of laps, pulse) as I go by.  The 5.30 is a rough approximation of my time for the .28 of each lap.  Overall I am averaging just over 3 miles per hour. 
Sounds like your training for a mini selection course Spec Ops and SAS do. Can you share what your up to? I'm intrigued.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #19 on: March 09, 2010, 06:19:49 PM »

At 57 I am a tad old for such things. 

Can I share?

No.  evil cheesy cheesy
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Rarick
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« Reply #20 on: March 10, 2010, 03:54:49 AM »

I have been told to be capable of 4-12 miles a day for 5 days over very uneven terrain.  We will be returning to a home base, probably a ranch, every night.

I see I have reported a major glitch.  My 1.1 mile time is NOT 5:30.  Hell my one mile time in high school was 6:00 and that was without any weight!  The dirt loop on which I have been doing my work is .28 (hence the weirdness of reporting increments of 1.1 miles) and everytime I pass my truck I have a piece of paper and a pen on the windshield wiper which I use to jot down my data (number of laps, pulse) as I go by.  The 5.30 is a rough approximation of my time for the .28 of each lap.  Overall I am averaging just over 3 miles per hour. 
Sounds like your training for a mini selection course Spec Ops and SAS do. Can you share what your up to? I'm intrigued.

Look lower on the thread
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tim nelson
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« Reply #21 on: March 19, 2010, 12:22:10 AM »

hey crafty, what tracking course are you attending? is it _________ tactical tracking? those guys are top notch.

some of the conditioning stuff i have been doing this winter: living in 3 pound sorel boots, hiking through shin to mid-thigh deep snow, dragging toboggans through unbroken snow and broken trails and down roads loaded with over 200 lbs of gear( on the slick road is very minimal resistance), jogging with the boots on when on a trail, and such activities, upper body strength can go down if not careful, carrying firewood and chopping it into length helps some

good and interesting to read the variety of workouts posted, thanks guys                  tim
« Last Edit: March 19, 2010, 12:43:24 AM by Crafty_Dog » Logged
Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #22 on: March 21, 2010, 03:20:06 PM »

This was of part of my first hill routine.

http://www.youtube.com/user/DBMAVIDS?feature=mhw4#p/a/u/0/pD7QO0m9hKc

Today I did the same, but worked up to 35lbs.
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Rarick
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« Reply #23 on: March 27, 2010, 07:42:18 AM »

I just read a lot of the original posts on this thread.  The conditioning referred to is the "toughening up" that everyone has to experience when doing any martial art.  Knowing when that punch REALLY hurt or figuring out what punishment you can routinely take and still be well enough to continue training.

I noticed that my SCA and BootCamp experiences did set me apart from a lot of the rest of the population, and martial arts training does that for non-service experienced folks.  The constant impact from doing bag work or pounding from jump rope or doing the miles to build base endurance.  the dings and dents of sparring and learning the new moves and falls.   The branches in the face from forgetting to duck when moving thru bush. The callouses built up from rock abrasion when climbing, hiking.

Basically you develop a sense of your own durability, because of all this activity, and your baseline of durability is far higher than most people.  The conditioning you have been thru also gives you a sense of how you can adapt to physical hardships, which is a rare thing for most people today. That helps explain the perception of the average joe six to 24 pack, that we are all nuts, heroes or extremely tough.  Our ability to endure and dish out is higher.

Crafty, since you are starting out with a higher baseline than the average joe, you are probably going to do fine in the tracking course.  all you are probably doing right now is getting used to the idea of the straps on your shoulders and getting some skin thickened up there. 
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #24 on: March 27, 2010, 07:11:38 PM »

Woof Rarick:

Tail wags for the kind words of encouragement.

Since I last posted on this thread I have done 6.16 miles with 40 lbs at 3 MPH and a 5 trip day at Bluff Cove with 40 lbs plus some lesser workouts.  Although I may be losing a bit by doing a seminar this weekend (I am in Toronto as I type) this week I will seek to test myself a bit for level ground distance with 40 lbs.
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Rarick
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« Reply #25 on: March 30, 2010, 07:36:57 AM »

Wear ankle weights or a weight vest if you can get away with it, they do help.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #26 on: March 30, 2010, 08:12:11 AM »

I am wearing a weight vest, but why the ankle weights?
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Rarick
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« Reply #27 on: March 30, 2010, 08:25:07 AM »

It builds the legs for stuff like sand and mud, and you said you are not used to boots either?  I can remember some hikes where I was busy hating on my boots, I spent a couple weeks with ankle weights (5lbs the weight of the saftey/combat boots) on whenever I had the chance and I did not have a problem afterwards unless I let myself go.  I also noticed that mud on the boots was not so annoying, and the give in the sand did not cause the endurance burn so much anymore. 

Think a week of forced marches from beach into the coastal hills, usually about 15 miles up to 30 miles at least once.  That is what made me decide to go technical when the opportunity came up, being tied to the runway or shop takes care of those "nature hikes with Malice gear".
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #28 on: March 30, 2010, 10:55:33 AM »

I got some Converse Army type boots after working with some special folks a few years ago, but frankly I don't like them at all.  They are blister factories.  I much prefer the civilian type Merrills hiking boots that I am using now in total comfort.
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jtheathus
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« Reply #29 on: April 08, 2010, 10:44:39 AM »

Girevoy Sport
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #30 on: April 08, 2010, 04:12:50 PM »

Uh , , , care to flesh that out a bit?  cheesy
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jtheathus
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« Reply #31 on: April 08, 2010, 10:57:31 PM »

Girevoy sport is competitive kettlebell lifting.  It's been a contested sport in Eastern Europe for years but has only relatively recently made its way to the US and other countries outside the Eastern Bloc.  For the development of both strength and endurance the methods used by competitive lifters to prepare for these events are probably second to none.  Training methods used by these athletes with just the kettlebell I believe take the place of many other forms of conditioning using other weights or training equipment.

The only events are the snatch using one kettlebell, the jerk using two and long cycle using two kettlebells as well but doing multiple clean and jerks.  Each is contested for ten minutes.  The goal is to perform as many lifts as possible.  Below are some clips of events.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h3BOsDVfSgk
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Mw23f-V_3k
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GwbsmqzTsko
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Rarick
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« Reply #32 on: April 09, 2010, 06:42:00 AM »

The best boots I ever had (and still have- 3rd resole) are Redwings.  I could not use them in the service- wrong color- but whenever long walks in the woods are likely I use them.  Yes they have some extra weight, but they have been to the top of El Capitan(CA), and the bottom of Silver Creek Falls (OR). They also held together when a pair of Timberlands self destructed on the side of Hood (WA), and have been all over Mary's Peak (OR) in or out of winter time.

A suggestion for conditioning too, would be to do some "bad Bush" work, going off the beaten path.  If someone/thing knows you are tracking them, they will not make it easy for you to catch them.  Better get used to coping with logs, whippy branches and all those wonderful woodsy gotchas when there is an easier way home.  Especially if you are going to be training in a decidedly "wilderness area" type environment where there is NO human intervention at all.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #33 on: April 09, 2010, 08:07:53 AM »

Not much of that available where I live in Los Angeles cheesy
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Rarick
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« Reply #34 on: April 09, 2010, 08:10:19 AM »

Do you have a regional park like the one in Thousand Oaks? (wildwood) It is mostly grass and scrub, but a lot of it blocks line of sight and would help you get used to mainaining direction while dodging trees and bush.
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« Reply #35 on: April 09, 2010, 08:42:00 AM »

I suppose, but I am a busy man with many claims on my time.  Teaching, training, family life, business matters, this forum  cheesy etc.

Though I am enjoying the training greatly, it is not easy finding the extra hours for the training involved for this tracking course already.  It took me three hours to walk the 9 miles on Tuesday-- and I am adding a mile a week until I hit 12 miles- which will be 4 hours.  The simple fact is I am not going to add lots of driving time on to what I am doing already.
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Rarick
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« Reply #36 on: April 09, 2010, 10:25:46 AM »

3 mph is a good pace.  Were you wearing a pack?
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« Reply #37 on: April 09, 2010, 08:52:06 PM »

A weight vest-- to more closely imitate how I will be wearing much of my weight on the course.

As for 3 mph being a good pace , , , you're being very kind.
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Rarick
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« Reply #38 on: April 10, 2010, 04:22:28 AM »

the military calculates its humps at that pace........that is with a 50 pound pack+the susper/belt tactical+ whatever you have in hand (rifle/ammo cans) so about 70 to 80 lbs.  So you like delta vests too?  I lke the weight ditribution on the as well.
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« Reply #39 on: April 10, 2010, 10:48:54 AM »

I've experienced full battle rattle a few times and I am greatly impressed with how efficiently it helps to carry the weight.  That said, the more I go into training this, the more in awe I am of what our fighting men are doing.  Here I am noticing the difference between 40 and 50 pounds and they are carrying 70-80 and sometimes much more than that-- and operating in temperatures overe 100 or more at altitudes that would tax me to walk unweighted.

Anyway, I have been told that we will be carrying about 45 pounds for 4-12 miles a day and returning to our base of operations every night.  The wide range of daily mileage I suspect is due to the fact that sometimes the trail is lost and lots of time must be invested in moving extra slowly while recovering it.
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Rarick
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« Reply #40 on: April 10, 2010, 11:55:57 PM »

Yeah, it is amazing what the body can do when properly maintained, and given the right conditioning for the operational environment.   The high cold mountains of Afpakistan to the low deserts of S, afghanistan and s. iraq..........
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« Reply #41 on: May 05, 2010, 07:06:10 AM »

Continuing my rucking based routine: I think I am ready to leave the flat course rucking behind and focus on hilly work. Yesterday did 60 pounds on my hilly route (150 feet in .33 of a mile according to mapmyquest.com ) for 3 miles. On non-rucking days I do my strength work-- currently focused on a return to heavier weights. (the weights are heavier for me, but the numbers are not impressive at all, I'm "just an old man having a good time") Monday was deadlifts and back (chins, t-bar bench rows. Today will be squats and chest/shoulders, along with rowing machine for cardio.
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« Reply #42 on: May 05, 2010, 03:13:25 PM »

Second post of the day:

I like the way this man thinks:

http://www.tmuscle.com/free_online_article_issue/issue_625#death-march
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Maxx
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« Reply #43 on: May 05, 2010, 10:49:47 PM »

Keep hitting those weights Marc! I love Dead Lifts, I am currently trying to Break a 400 Dead, I squatted 435 last Wednesday and my knees are not the same today ahahah.

You can try the Bear

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0WOP9J7QPwI

I am currently pushing 135 on this and it's killing me. Give it a try
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« Reply #44 on: May 05, 2010, 11:33:08 PM »

Looks awesome Max, but the range of motion for my elbows simply does not allow for the clean and front squat. cry

Right now I am just returning to deadlifting after many years away from it AND I am rucking what is for me at a fairly intense level so I am starting out easy and just taking the progress that comes easily.  Squatting has remained part of my annual cycle for many years and I am fairly familiar with how my numbers on it go.  Today was the first day of my squat cycle.  I certainly could have gone heavier than I did, but I am more interested in how I will do tomorrow on my hilly ruck route.  I am thinking of upping to 70 pounds and/or increasing the distance.
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« Reply #45 on: May 05, 2010, 11:53:23 PM »

I would love to try and fit that into my program but School,Training and other does not allow me to fit anything like rucking. If I had the time I would, Man I would love to. But right now it's just lifting heavy arse weight, Push and keep pushing! To even get Cardio in I had to create a Sayoc Abdominal Cardio Template to get everything in. The template works and keeps my game up in the Knife department.
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Rarick
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« Reply #46 on: May 07, 2010, 06:13:08 AM »

the parking lot here at work sometimes has people playing tractor pull with their SUV's...........  The guy with the minicooper catches endless grief............  acouple of the guys here do an around the block pull with a weight sled, but that NSW mile is downright ugly.   There is also that routine that came out when "spartans" was playing several excesizes that totaled 300 reps and destroyed the body.  A google or search on youtube will turn it up.
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« Reply #47 on: May 09, 2010, 12:52:56 AM »

40 minutes today with 80 pounds and another 40 with 70 pounds on the Bluff Cove path.  Huffin' and puffin'!
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« Reply #48 on: May 11, 2010, 11:11:53 PM »

My required working weight is 45 pounds, so today I did 45 pounds for 6 miles (9 trips down and up) at Bluff Cove.  Nasal strips definitely helping breathing.
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« Reply #49 on: May 19, 2010, 06:18:20 PM »

6.67 miles today with 45 pounds at Bluff Cove.
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