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Author Topic: Conditioning  (Read 14569 times)
Rarick
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« Reply #50 on: May 20, 2010, 05:54:47 AM »

Looks like you are going to do fine. How are the collarbone, neck, and head feeling? The aches manageable?
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #51 on: May 20, 2010, 11:17:05 AM »

 huh
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Monkey Man
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« Reply #52 on: June 11, 2010, 03:29:35 PM »

When I was in competitive martial arts in my youth and in the military. I found arm endurance was critical as leg endurance to a competitive activities. From the high pan-aerobic type exercises I could lock my arms and people could not break my locks. In organized team work outs we would do pushups for arm endurance. The pushups would condition the triceps and the pecs but not the biceps, and forearms, which were my fortie (I think that is the correct spelling). I had influences who were into alternative forms of exercise one that stuck is the link below. I am thinking this kind of conditioning would also improve the abilities of the stick fighter. Since the suggested movements are from light sticks to heaver sticks. When in public someone can use weights with the same movements, and bring less attention to themselves.

I am not sure please let us know what your thoughts are. Can this type of exercise improve the fighting potential of a competitor?

http://www.cbass.com/DESKOF.HTM
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5RingsFitness
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« Reply #53 on: June 12, 2010, 06:04:33 PM »

just finished 80 sets of vo2 snatches with a 16kg bell at 7 reps per set on the 15:15 protocol

grip, hip drive, and lung capacity all get taxed
though, since I have done this protocol a few times now, 80 sets is not that big of a stretch any more
barely get out of breath, not bragging, just saying that you adapt to whatever you do and if you minimize the stress levels, you adapt faster

40 minutes tops, 15 sq feet of space with enough overhead room for the weight at full lock out, and a moderate weight  and you are in business

if anyone is interested in the protocol I can give you the basics pretty quickly

once a week has been my pattern lately, with as much stick work and knife action as I can fit into my schedule
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"Nations have passed away and left no traces, And history gives the naked cause of it - One single simple reason in all cases; They fell because their peoples were not fit."-Rudyard Kipling
Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #54 on: June 12, 2010, 06:43:21 PM »

a) A snatch is from hanging to shoulder or overhead?

b) Are you saying you have 15 seconds to do 7 reps and then 15 seconds to rest?
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Glewis007
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« Reply #55 on: June 13, 2010, 11:18:56 PM »

just finished 80 sets of vo2 snatches with a 16kg bell at 7 reps per set on the 15:15 protocol

grip, hip drive, and lung capacity all get taxed
though, since I have done this protocol a few times now, 80 sets is not that big of a stretch any more
barely get out of breath, not bragging, just saying that you adapt to whatever you do and if you minimize the stress levels, you adapt faster

40 minutes tops, 15 sq feet of space with enough overhead room for the weight at full lock out, and a moderate weight  and you are in business

if anyone is interested in the protocol I can give you the basics pretty quickly

once a week has been my pattern lately, with as much stick work and knife action as I can fit into my schedule
We did this workout a while back  , at the kettlebell place I train at here in Ohio. It was snatch from the floor up over the head to lock out. It was Brutal and humbleling !
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #56 on: June 14, 2010, 06:39:05 AM »

Is this "saying (I) have 15 seconds to do 7 reps and then 15 seconds to rest?"
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selfcritical
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« Reply #57 on: June 14, 2010, 08:54:22 AM »

just finished 80 sets of vo2 snatches with a 16kg bell at 7 reps per set on the 15:15 protocol

grip, hip drive, and lung capacity all get taxed
though, since I have done this protocol a few times now, 80 sets is not that big of a stretch any more
barely get out of breath, not bragging, just saying that you adapt to whatever you do and if you minimize the stress levels, you adapt faster

40 minutes tops, 15 sq feet of space with enough overhead room for the weight at full lock out, and a moderate weight  and you are in business

if anyone is interested in the protocol I can give you the basics pretty quickly

once a week has been my pattern lately, with as much stick work and knife action as I can fit into my schedule

How long did it take you to work up to that? Also, did you get any HR measurements?
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selfcritical
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« Reply #58 on: June 14, 2010, 08:57:48 AM »

a) A snatch is from hanging to shoulder or overhead?

b) Are you saying you have 15 seconds to do 7 reps and then 15 seconds to rest?

A hardstyle kettlebell snatch is from fully loaded position (bell swung behind you) to fully locked out (the bell in the same position it would be at the top of a military press, where it must hang motionless for a moment). On the way down you will actively spike the weight so that it swings back into the "hike" position before repeating.

The cadence is based on dividing up your max snatches over a minute. It's basically dipping just above anerobic threshold and then recovering multiple times. It's an escalating volume protocol, so you would start with whatever percentage of 80 sets you can comfortably finish and then adding sets each session
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5RingsFitness
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« Reply #59 on: June 14, 2010, 10:47:37 AM »

a) A snatch is from hanging to shoulder or overhead?

b) Are you saying you have 15 seconds to do 7 reps and then 15 seconds to rest?

the snatch is executed as selfcritical described, a swing back from the 3 pt postition to full overhead lockout (bell and shoulder in same line)

most folks start at 6, some at 7, it depends on the cadence test

yep, you work on a 15:15 work rest ratio for as many rounds as you can manage with good form while maintaining the cadence

and as selfcritical stipulates, you accelerate the bell on the down swing (it weighs up to 4 times more as you pull it out of the hole because of this, overspeed eccentric)

as to how long it took to work up to this

I am an RKC, so I had a good deal of proficiency in the snatch before I started, but it took about 3 mos total to hit the first 80 sets at 6 per, about 3 wks later it was 80 at 7, then about 1 mos later 80 at 8, I then continued on the protocol as it is designed to go for 36 sets of 20 on the 36:36 work rest ratio

I have also done this with single and double 16kg push press for 6/7/8 reps per

it can be brutal, but gratifying

the conditioning you get for the grip, legs, arms, shoulders and explosive power in the legs and the core stabilization work are all big hits in my book

lots of bang for your buck

did it in the rain again this weekend, and that is a whole other animal Wink
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"Nations have passed away and left no traces, And history gives the naked cause of it - One single simple reason in all cases; They fell because their peoples were not fit."-Rudyard Kipling
5RingsFitness
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« Reply #60 on: June 14, 2010, 10:52:51 AM »

just finished 80 sets of vo2 snatches with a 16kg bell at 7 reps per set on the 15:15 protocol

grip, hip drive, and lung capacity all get taxed
though, since I have done this protocol a few times now, 80 sets is not that big of a stretch any more
barely get out of breath, not bragging, just saying that you adapt to whatever you do and if you minimize the stress levels, you adapt faster

40 minutes tops, 15 sq feet of space with enough overhead room for the weight at full lock out, and a moderate weight  and you are in business

if anyone is interested in the protocol I can give you the basics pretty quickly

once a week has been my pattern lately, with as much stick work and knife action as I can fit into my schedule

How long did it take you to work up to that? Also, did you get any HR measurements?


I have not checked in a while, my resting is between 45 and 65 avg

I have been up above 205 for 5 minutes straight snatching the 24kg, that was fun

maybe next time out I will hit the monitor again

this protocol is specifically designed to increase strength and cardivascular conditioning at the same time, with a side effect of an increase in the ejection fraction of the left ventricle without increasing the thickness of the muscle wall

one of my clients went from heart disease with lower than avg ejection fraction to better than avg in 3 mos while simultaneously losing about 30 pounds of fat and gaining close to 15 pounds of muscle, went up 3 coat sizes and had to buy new pants, not for the waist Wink



all I know, is it makes knife and stick sparring a lot easier, and thai pads dont kill me the way they used to

more gas, more power and torque, lower rpms
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"Nations have passed away and left no traces, And history gives the naked cause of it - One single simple reason in all cases; They fell because their peoples were not fit."-Rudyard Kipling
selfcritical
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« Reply #61 on: June 14, 2010, 11:28:57 AM »

a) A snatch is from hanging to shoulder or overhead?

b) Are you saying you have 15 seconds to do 7 reps and then 15 seconds to rest?

the snatch is executed as selfcritical described, a swing back from the 3 pt postition to full overhead lockout (bell and shoulder in same line)

most folks start at 6, some at 7, it depends on the cadence test

yep, you work on a 15:15 work rest ratio for as many rounds as you can manage with good form while maintaining the cadence

and as selfcritical stipulates, you accelerate the bell on the down swing (it weighs up to 4 times more as you pull it out of the hole because of this, overspeed eccentric)

as to how long it took to work up to this

I am an RKC, so I had a good deal of proficiency in the snatch before I started, but it took about 3 mos total to hit the first 80 sets at 6 per, about 3 wks later it was 80 at 7, then about 1 mos later 80 at 8, I then continued on the protocol as it is designed to go for 36 sets of 20 on the 36:36 work rest ratio

I have also done this with single and double 16kg push press for 6/7/8 reps per

it can be brutal, but gratifying

the conditioning you get for the grip, legs, arms, shoulders and explosive power in the legs and the core stabilization work are all big hits in my book

lots of bang for your buck

did it in the rain again this weekend, and that is a whole other animal Wink

I've done the 15:15 twice. Usually takes me about 4 weeks. My issue is I went to this immediately after having done tons of HIIT work, and I really didn't have a very strong Aerobic base. I've cut back on this and am specifically working on cardiac output work for a while, and will get back to VWC as soon as I've lowered my RHR some more.
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5RingsFitness
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« Reply #62 on: July 13, 2010, 10:15:10 PM »

more of a results of conditioning but any way

recently had to make a 1 mile run in torrential downpour with full pack (my edc pack weighs in at around 60lbs with laptop, training blades, sticks, video and ipod gear, cords, whatever I am reading, my work and gym clothes etc.)

managed to nail it in tevas in less than 9 minutes, and barely got my breath up

love me some kettlebells for conditioning
and I love me some biofeedback to let me in on what to do
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"Nations have passed away and left no traces, And history gives the naked cause of it - One single simple reason in all cases; They fell because their peoples were not fit."-Rudyard Kipling
Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #63 on: July 13, 2010, 11:21:43 PM »

 shocked shocked shocked grin
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5RingsFitness
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« Reply #64 on: July 14, 2010, 06:31:47 AM »

for anyone who has to wear a tactical style boot for job or just because you like em

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C_cNF-3pZXs&feature=autofb

practical review of the Nike SFB from a gentleman that just finished Ranger School

apparently they are good for Rucking.....
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"Nations have passed away and left no traces, And history gives the naked cause of it - One single simple reason in all cases; They fell because their peoples were not fit."-Rudyard Kipling
5RingsFitness
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« Reply #65 on: July 31, 2010, 05:06:12 PM »

VO2 max day

10 minutes of turkish get ups with a 16kg bell
66 rounds of 15:15 work rest ratio consisting of 10 rounds of double 16kg push press @6 per set/10 rounds of snatches 16kg @6 per set(switching hands each round)/10 rounds of 16kg push press @6 per set/10 rounds of double 16kg push press @6 per set/10 rounds of snatches 16kg @6 per set(switching hands each round)/10 rounds of 16kg push press @6 per set/ending with 6 sets of double 16kg cleans @6 per set

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"Nations have passed away and left no traces, And history gives the naked cause of it - One single simple reason in all cases; They fell because their peoples were not fit."-Rudyard Kipling
pau
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« Reply #66 on: August 10, 2010, 05:59:18 PM »

Crafty, are you still with the  Vibram shoes?Huh how are they working for you
 how sturdy are they?Huh

Edit:

I juste chequed the Vibram page and the onely store that Officialy caries them IN HOLE mexico its a walking distans from my home haha
« Last Edit: August 10, 2010, 09:41:38 PM by pau » Logged

guau desde mex ^^

woof from mex ^^
5RingsFitness
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« Reply #67 on: August 12, 2010, 02:12:18 PM »

not Guru Crafty, but I have a pair of kso's and sprints that I wear almost daily for more than a year
my gym pair finally (after 2 yrs) started to wear through on the big toe
the flow's only see use during the cooler months and they are going strong with little sign of wear

I have 2 prs of sprints, one pair of kso's and a pair of flow's
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"Nations have passed away and left no traces, And history gives the naked cause of it - One single simple reason in all cases; They fell because their peoples were not fit."-Rudyard Kipling
pau
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« Reply #68 on: August 14, 2010, 10:54:29 PM »

Thanks 5Rings il give them a try then  grin
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guau desde mex ^^

woof from mex ^^
lonelydog
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« Reply #69 on: August 16, 2010, 03:09:57 PM »

Pau:

I echo 5Rings comments.  I wear mine quite frequently, including for athletic endeavor (e.g. playing lacrosse with my son).

Also, I forget if you are married, but if you are not you will be able to enjoy the many conversations women initiate with you about them  wink
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5RingsFitness
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« Reply #70 on: September 13, 2010, 01:26:11 PM »

recently I had to make a concession to the reality of the envrionment (I live in MN) and professional appearance

you may also check out vivo barefoot shoes

dharma or aquas are my pick

3mm kevlar sole, super thin, super flexible, and they look like normal shoes
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"Nations have passed away and left no traces, And history gives the naked cause of it - One single simple reason in all cases; They fell because their peoples were not fit."-Rudyard Kipling
G M
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« Reply #71 on: September 13, 2010, 01:47:08 PM »

Just started working out with kettlebells. Got a good reminder how important proper form is when I started to stand up a bit too early while doing two arm swings.  shocked

Lucky it was the smallest kettlebell and I had mostly stopped it's motion....  rolleyes
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #72 on: September 13, 2010, 04:59:05 PM »

Quoting myself, "Intelligence is the amount of time it takes to forget a lesson." 

Lets see how long you remember this one  cheesy
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G M
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« Reply #73 on: September 13, 2010, 05:20:05 PM »

I think that lesson was conditioned right into the deepest part of my brain.  cry
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Stickgrappler
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"...grappling happens. It just does." - Top Dog


« Reply #74 on: October 12, 2010, 08:43:38 AM »

Quote
Walker eats once a day and trains 6 to 7 hours in mixed martial arts

This is mind-boggling!

Copied and pasted from http://www.cnn.com/2010/HEALTH/10/11/herschel.fitness.martial.arts/index.html?hpt=C2:

Quote
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Herschel Walker, 48, is training for his second mixed martial arts fight, set for December 4
  • Former running back: "I'm in better shape than I've ever been in"
  • Walker eats once a day and trains 6 to 7 hours in mixed martial arts
  • He's also had stints in ballet dancing and Olympic bobsledding


(CNN) -- Javier Mendez, a mixed martial arts trainer for 32 years, scoffed when he heard that retired NFL star Herschel Walker, who's nearing 50, wanted to compete in ultimate fighting.

"Yeah, I didn't think he could do it," Mendez said. "I thought it was a joke."

Walker had been out of football for 12 years. Aging football players tend to get flabby, play golf or relive the spotlight under "Dancing With the Stars."

But the 1982 Heisman Trophy winner from the University of Georgia always had an unorthodox streak.

After stints of ballet dancing, Olympic bobsledding, running track and field, gaining a black belt in taekwondo and retiring from a celebrated football career, Renaissance jock Walker has dived into the most physically demanding and controversial sport of his career.

At 48, Walker is training for his second Strikeforce mixed martial arts fight, scheduled for December 4.

"I was in great shape when I was younger," he said. "This is the toughest thing I've ever done. I think that's the reason I'm in better shape than I've ever been in."

He was chosen to pose naked for ESPN The Magazine's "The Body" issue, out last week, to show his muscular physique.

"I'm going to do something different, to be a little different than the average person," he said. "You can't be in the same cookie cutter."

Walker has never followed the fitness norms.

He eats once a day, skipping breakfast and lunch. After a long, intense day of training, he eats salad and bread for dinner. He doesn't care for meat or fuss about getting enough protein. Walker's a vegetarian.

"It's a mindset -- something I've been doing for a long time," he said. "I don't worry about protein. I don't worry about all that. I'm from old school. I grew up in south Georgia. They didn't worry about cholesterol or protein. They went out and worked and lived a long time, so I don't put a lot of worries in my mind. I just get it done."

Sometimes, Walker doesn't have an appetite and will go through seven hours of wrestling, kickboxing, sparring and practicing jujitsu without having eaten for three or four days.

"It's just unbelievable," said Mendez, who trains Walker at the American Kickboxing Academy in San Jose, California. "He shouldn't be able to do what he's doing. I don't think it's possible to eat as little as possible and work out the way he does. There's no way. He's an unbelievable athlete."

Mendez doesn't try to change it either.

"You can't fix it, because it's not broken," he said. "You can try to understand it -- good luck with that."

And no, Mendez thinks it probably won't work for most people.

At 5:30 a.m., Walker wakes up to do 750 to 1,500 push-ups and about 2,000 sit-ups.

"I try to show the world at my age, I could do it," Walker said. "I'm not trying to be arrogant. My parents say you can't make excuses in life, you've got to get it done."

And he did. In his first Strikeforce fight in January, Walker defeated Greg Nagy, a fighter almost half his age.

Walker's genesis into a Renaissance jock sprang from chubby beginnings.

He was a pudgy boy with a stutter who was picked on and shoved as a child.

At 15, he said he "started working out after watching 'Love Connection' and started doing push-ups and sit-ups," he said. "I started doing it on my own -- that gave me confidence."

As he developed into an athlete, his interests varied from two-man bobsledding to ballet.

"When I started out as little kid, I didn't say I just want to run football. I wanted to be a great athlete," he said.

"It's mind over matter. You got to work at it. You can't assume you're a great football player so you'll win in bobsledding. It doesn't mean you don't have to work."

Walker's recent return to competition sends a different message to middle-aged men who believe that getting out of shape is the inevitable part of aging, his trainer said.

"It doesn't matter your age," Mendez said. "You can do it at any age. Look at your desire. Don't let age be a barrier to prevent you from doing something you want to do."

Shortly after his retirement from football in 1997, Walker began having symptoms of mental illness and struggled with dissociative identity disorder, or DID, formerly known as multiple personality disorder.

Herschel Walker reveals many sides of himself

Walker said he receives therapy to control the disorder.

"I have problems and as long as you admit you have a problem, that's how you become better," he said.

He even considered an NFL comeback before deciding on mixed martial arts.

The high-contact, bloody sport has often been criticized for brutality as fighters can knee, elbow and kick each other in the face. Walker shrugs off the criticism about the sport.

Fans attracted to 'forbidden fruit' of violence

"The idea of football is just as physical as MMA," he said. "I don't worry about it."

What if he gets knocked down by a younger, stronger, more nimble opponent in the ring?

"I do this 'Walker shake,' " he said. "You got to get knocked down many times, shake it off. Life is about ups and downs, and you got to keep standing up."



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"A good stickgrappler has good stick skills, good grappling, and good stickgrappling and can keep track of all three simultaneously. This is a good trick and can be quite effective." - Marc "Crafty Dog" Denny
5RingsFitness
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« Reply #75 on: October 12, 2010, 12:52:02 PM »

sounds like a modified Warrior Diet or Eat Stop Eat

controlled fasting

consistent conscious exercise is a truly beautiful thing to behold
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"Nations have passed away and left no traces, And history gives the naked cause of it - One single simple reason in all cases; They fell because their peoples were not fit."-Rudyard Kipling
Stickgrappler
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« Reply #76 on: October 12, 2010, 01:13:57 PM »

sounds like a modified Warrior Diet or Eat Stop Eat

controlled fasting

consistent conscious exercise is a truly beautiful thing to behold

Woof 5ROF:

I didn't read Eat Stop Eat, but thought I read a blurb about it somewhere and it advocated fasting/skipping 2 meals only every few days? Vs eating 1 meal per day?
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"A good stickgrappler has good stick skills, good grappling, and good stickgrappling and can keep track of all three simultaneously. This is a good trick and can be quite effective." - Marc "Crafty Dog" Denny
5RingsFitness
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« Reply #77 on: October 14, 2010, 10:13:54 PM »

thats why I tossed in the "modified"

so far everythig I can lay hands on that  has  enough data behind it indicates a modified Atkins with more high quality carbs from fruits and veggies and more fish is the big hit

plant based with lots of omega 3,9,11

I say whatever works for the individual and whatever is germane to the task at hand
for instance
all day today snacking on almonds and green tea
now I am devouring the wicked beans and rice with some tasty food and things that food eats in it
followed shortly by ranger IPA
and what looked like brownies

I always ask my clients"what are you doing x"
if they have a decent answer I say cool
if not we get our learn on
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"Nations have passed away and left no traces, And history gives the naked cause of it - One single simple reason in all cases; They fell because their peoples were not fit."-Rudyard Kipling
Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #78 on: June 07, 2011, 11:10:43 AM »

A few times a week, Ret Taylor can be spotted dangling upside down from a tree branch about 20 feet in the air in New York's Central Park.

View Interactive

Brian Harkin for The Wall Street Journal
 
Ret Taylor lifts a found log while working out in Central Park.
."A lot of little old ladies stop and look concerned," he says.

The 32-year-old Mr. Taylor isn't channeling his grade-school jungle-gym skills. He's trying to mimic how our ancestors might have exercised before the advent of high-tech gyms and yoga studios.

Mr. Taylor was inspired by a program called MovNat, short for "Move Naturally," founded by France's Erwan Le Corre in 2008. The idea is simple: Turn nature into your gym. Get out in the sunlight and run in fresh air. Rocks become dumbbells and tree branches become pull-up bars.

..Before he embraced natural movement, the founder of R. E. Taylor Associates Inc., a sales and consulting firm for the hospitality furniture- and fixture-manufacturing industry, logged about 70 miles a week training for marathons and ultramarathons (races longer than 26.2 miles). After nearly seven years of marathon training, Mr. Taylor had developed plantar fasciitis, an irritation of the thick tissue on the bottom of the foot that causes heel pain. He also had constant pain in his shins.

In December, Mr. Taylor got a wake-up call after a pick-up basketball game with friends. "I had crazy blisters, and my legs were killing me," he says. Despite his prime cardiovascular shape, he realized the long-distance running only worked a few muscles. "If I wanted to be a well-rounded athlete, I had to focus more on the rest of my body," he says.

View Full Image

Brian Harkin for The Wall Street Journal
 
New York's Central Park serves as a fully equipped gym for Ret Taylor, who follows a workout style focused on natural movement.
.He had read a magazine article about MovNat a few weeks earlier and decided to give it a try.

Mr. Taylor hasn't missed a weekend of MovNat-inspired workouts since. About a month ago, Mr. Taylor formed a group on meetup.com called Natural Movement NYC. Now, about 20 people meet on weekends to run, jump and climb through Central Park.

He says his runner's aches have disappeared since he started natural-movement runs and cut his overall mileage.

The Workout
Mr. Taylor works out seven days a week, training each Saturday with the group in Central Park. His workout lasts two hours, but others might stay for less time. "But I'm there until the last person wants to be done," he says.

Au Naturel, or Almost
The fitness philosophy of natural movement combined with the buzz around Christopher McDougall's best-selling book "Born to Run" have spurred a growing curiosity about barefoot, or near-barefoot, running.

In turn, this has inspired a new category of running shoe known as minimalist or natural shoes. Minimalist shoes have a very slight heel and arch support and mimic the naked foot hitting the ground.

Runners say they like the new shoes' extremely light weight. The shoes also appeal to runners' desires to strengthen foot muscles, attain a more efficient running gait and cut the risk of injury.

John Pagliano, a runner, podiatrist and clinical professor at the Long Beach Memorial Medical Center Podiatric Surgery program in California, says the design of the minimalist shoes changes a runner's gait.

"The idea is that you run more forward on your foot, rather than back on your heel," he says. This prompts you to take shorter, more frequent strides and to land more softly than with conventional running shoes.

Whether that prevents injury or makes you faster is debatable. "There is no specific evidence that runners [using minimalist shoes] have fewer foot injuries or ankle sprains," he says. However, "there are some studies that show that barefoot conditions increased muscle strength," Dr. Pagliano adds.

Warren Greene, a Runner's World magazine editor known as the shoe guru, says starting out running too much, too soon in minimalist shoes can cause problems. "Most people will experience really bad calf or Achilles pain." He advises wearing minimalist shoes for short periods a few days a week before gradually ramping up the mileage.

Irene Davis, director of the Spaulding National Running Center at Harvard Medical School, says up to 75% of runners get injured each year from a running-related injury. "I believe we were designed to run so we shouldn't be getting injured at this rate," says Dr. Davis, who has been running barefoot since 2009 and hasn't had any injuries beyond a blister from hot pavement.

--Jen Murphy
.The group covers three to six miles of running, stopping every half mile or so for push-ups or crunches, often using objects in the park like they are gym equipment. "Every three minutes we're doing something else," he says, adding each person works at his or her own pace. "I might do 12 pull-ups, and someone else might do 20, and someone else might do four."

Mr. Taylor works out the other six days a week on his own. Weekday mornings he jogs barefoot on a grassy area before doing sprints. He does a series of jumping jacks, high kicks, jump-rope intervals and push-ups. He also works out for an hour or two at night.

The Diet
Mr. Taylor says he eats fairly healthily now, but he has gradually been adopting the Paleo Diet, which is based on foods available to early humans. It focuses on protein, vegetables and fruit. "The idea is to think about what people had before agriculture," says Mr. Taylor. "So I stay away from sugar, salt, dairy and really anything you couldn't hunt or gather."

Gear
Rather than go barefoot, Mr. Taylor wears minimalist shoes that have a very slight heel and arch support. Mr. Taylor bought his Vibram FiveFingers shoes three years ago after reading the book, "Born to Run," about the Tarahumara, an indigenous people in Mexico famed for their barefoot long-distance running.

He eased his way into the minimalist shoes, starting with short runs on grass or gravel. "I could feel my feet getting stronger." He says they often inspire just as many inquisitive stares in the park as tree climbing.

Fitness Tip
"It's all about improvising and not knowing what's around the next corner. You can work anything into it, be it a bench or a curb or a staircase," Mr. Taylor says.

Write to Jen Murphy at workout@wsj.com

.View Full Image

Vibram
 
Vibram FiveFingers Bikila
.Vibram FiveFingers Bikila
$100; vibramfivefingers.com

The first of Vibram's 'toe shoes' for running has a 7 millimeter heel height. The shoe mimics being barefoot with a thin, flexible bottom and individually pocketed toes. Thin padding protects the ball of the foot.

.View Full Image

Reebok
 
Reebok RealFlex
.Reebok RealFlex
$89.98; reebok.com.

Reebok's first foray in the natural-movement category has 76 multidirectional rubber nodes built into the sole to give a near-barefoot feel. The heel is 20% lower to the ground than a traditional running shoe.

.View Full Image

New Balance
 
New Balance MT10 Minimus Trail
.New Balance MT10 Minimus Trail
$100; newbalance.com

This trail-running shoe was designed to be worn with or without socks. The shoes weigh 7.1 ounces. New Balance collaborated with Vibram to develop the shoes.

.View Full Image

Nike
 
Nike Free Run +2
.Nike Free Run +2
$90; nikerunning.com

The updated version of the original Nike Free, one of the first minimalist shoes, has an upper design inspired by the anatomy of the foot. Deep flex grooves along the outer sole allow a natural range of motion.

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DougMacG
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« Reply #79 on: August 29, 2011, 01:29:08 PM »

Don't try this at home.  wink  I have an interest in high altitude training, this $75k pressurized capsule simulates something like that - allegedly for health and conditioning benefits:

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424053111904787404576532854267519860.html?mod=WSJ_hp_MIDDLENexttoWhatsNewsTop

Serbian tennis star Novak Djokovic hasn't earned his No. 1 ranking by taking the conventional road. There's his odd ritual of excessive ball bouncing before serves, which can break an opponent's concentration. There's his new gluten-free diet, which he's said has helped him feel stronger on the court.

Novak Djokovic and other athletes are using a secret weapon called a CVAC pod that they believe boosts performance by simulating high altitude.

Ever since last year's U.S. Open, Djokovic has been trying to improve his fitness by climbing into a rare $75,000 egg-shaped, bobsled-sized pressure chamber.

The machine, which is made by a California-based company called CVAC Systems and hasn't been banned by any sports governing bodies, is one of only 20 in the world. Unlike the increasingly trendy $5,000 hyperbaric chambers many professional athletes use to saturate the blood with oxygen and stimulate healing, the CVAC is a considerably more-ambitious contraption. It uses a computer-controlled valve and a vacuum pump to simulate high altitude and compress the muscles at rhythmic intervals.

The company claims that spending up to 20 minutes in the pod three times a week can boost athletic performance by improving circulation, boosting oxygen-rich red-blood cells, removing lactic acid and possibly even stimulating mitochondrial biogenesis and stem-cell production.

Djokovic is so convinced that the pod helps his game that during the U.S. Open, which starts Monday, he's staying (for the fourth year) with a wealthy tennis-trainer friend in Alpine, N.J. who keeps one of the machines on his property.

Djokovic has never mentioned the pod publicly before. He acknowledged using it for the first time last week during a sponsor event in New York after he was asked about it for this article. "I think it really helps—not with muscle but more with recovery after an exhausting set," he said. "It's like a spaceship. It's very interesting technology."

The pod, which is seven feet long, three feet wide and seven feet high with the lid open, looks like a cross between a tanning bed and the giant egg Lady Gaga emerged from at the Grammys. CVAC says its pod is different from other pressurized chambers on the market because it combines altitude pressure with cyclic compression (a combination some studies suggest is more effective than one or the other). Because the pressure, temperature, air density in the CVAC pod can be adjusted, the company says it enhances an athlete's ability to adapt to a range of conditions.

While pod users don't do much beyond sitting while they are inside (cellphone use is permitted), CVAC Systems chief executive Allen Ruszkowski says the treatment seems to have many of the same effects on the body as intense exercise. He claims that the technology may be twice as effective at helping the body absorb oxygen as blood doping—a banned form of performance enhancement.

Former U.S. Olympic wrestling coach Bob Anderson, motocross racer Ivan Tedesco and ultra cyclist George Vargas say they've used the pod and believe it helps. CVAC's Ruszkowski says a slew of other high-profile athletes use the Pod but often insist the company doesn't tell anyone, "because they feel it's a competitive advantage." Rock star Axl Rose owns a pod as well, according to his spokeswoman.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #80 on: August 29, 2011, 11:04:49 PM »

I better get me one of those things! My son is now beating me up The Dune! shocked cheesy
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Russ
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« Reply #81 on: July 18, 2012, 10:52:59 AM »

I just starting running three weeks ago, and after two weeks of road runs, I switched to running on a track last week.

Here is my workout from today.

Two sets of 800 meters running (2 laps) followed by 400 meters (1 lap) walking.

The running times were:

4:09
4:01

Two sets of 400 meters running and 400 walking.

The running times were:

1:48
1:40

Total distance was 4000 meters.

I had planned to run split 400s (400 sprinted/ 400 walked) for 4800 meters, but I thought the above method would be a better workout today.


On Saturday, I ran six laps with these times:

Lap 1-  1:38

Lap 2-  3:50 (2:12)

Lap 3-  5:40 (1:50)

Lap 4-  7:42 (2:02)

Lap 5-  9:40 (1:58)

Lap 6-  11:45 (2:05)


Last Thursday, I split it like this:

1200 meters (3 laps)-

Lap 1-  2:06

Lap 2-  2:14

Lap 3-  2:20

Total-  6:34

This was too slow.

I wanted to get my body used to feeling a faster lap, so I shifted to splits (400 meters walking/ 400 meters sprinting).

Here's how they went:

Lap 4-  5:00

Lap 5-  1:40

Lap 6-  5:00

Lap 7-  1:30

Lap 8-  5:00

Lap 9-  1:28

That's a lot of rest time, but I was going for speed on the 400s.


Later that day, I ran these:

800 meters-  3:50

1:30 rest

800 meters-  4:01

1:30 rest

800 meters- 4:03

1:30 rest

400 meters- 2:12 (cool down)


The split lap training really helps you pick up your speed.

I went from running a 13:25 on Wednesday to running an 11:45 on Saturday.

It also really helps to time yourself and see if you are improving or not.
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dcoe
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« Reply #82 on: July 18, 2012, 11:43:41 AM »

I just recently switched to a modified paleo diet with caloric restriction.  feeling better each day I'm on it.  I also just started back into conditioning work.  M, W, F I try to do weighted cardio that mimics the movements a person uses in stickfighting.  I do two minute rounds with a one minute rest for about 30 minutes then I walk/jog for another 20.  T, R, S, are stick training days: I try to spar or fight at least once per week and the other days I'm doing stick play drills and heavy bag work.  I also do shorinkan karate twice a week just for a change up as it is mostly cardio-aerobic in nature with no impact -- it's a nice active resting workout.  When I was training MMA my goals was always to be able to do five minute rounds, even though most amateur fights were three minute rounds because adrenaline tends to suck at least a minute of your conditioning.  It's also good to vary the length of your sparring and fighting rounds from between 30 sec to "start the clock let's see how long we can go".  This requires you to work different strategies and mindsets. 

love and respect
Darrin Coe
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #83 on: July 18, 2012, 03:55:53 PM »

I did Bluff Cove yesterday for four trips (see the vid-clip on the site here/youtube)  I was pleased with my time of 40:01 (previous time was 47:35, but as I recover from my adductor tear, naturally times improve) The spot is beautiful and I respond well to the hilliness and unevenness of the terrain.  My speed is highly variable.  Most of the time I'm walking briskly, with some jogging mingled in with a brief sprint the last rise coming to the top so as to peak my heart rate.  When I arrive at the top I do take my heart rate via the watch that I wear. 

I get a good sweat from this routine.
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Russ
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« Reply #84 on: July 21, 2012, 01:20:20 PM »

DBMA Connecticut

Road Runs-  July 21st, 2012

1) Morning- Vernon Road to Bolton Road roundtrip to the Bolton Lake Dam wall (1.5 km, slow & smooth, untimed).

2) Early Afternoon- Vernon Road to Quarry Road (up steep hill), (2.6 km, moderate pace, 15:01).

Cool down- swim in the Lake (160 meters).
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pau
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« Reply #85 on: July 21, 2012, 11:15:09 PM »

Well to me i don't have much time so I'm doing the insanity work out every day for a Doce pares tournament if any one have don them you know you need more explosive cardio cardio than  any thing so il tel you how it goes

oo the tournament is in one month so i hop to be more than in shape Wink
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guau desde mex ^^

woof from mex ^^
dcoe
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« Reply #86 on: July 23, 2012, 12:58:12 PM »

Try this for a good energy pick me up with limited calories or salt.

1 cup blueberries
1/4 cup dark chocolate M & Ms
28 dark chocolate almonds

makes a great mid  morning energy snack

Darrin Coe
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dcoe
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« Reply #87 on: July 23, 2012, 01:15:19 PM »

Got this from the loseit.com website (a really good app for kindle by the way)

Eat clean train mean

You wanna change your shape lift something heavy

You wanna build up ur endurance do cardio

You want those ABS? Eat right, your abs aren’t a wastebasket…

It all ties together…


Darrin Coe, Ph.D.
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Russ
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« Reply #88 on: July 25, 2012, 11:59:33 AM »

Road Run

Bolton Lake Kora- clockwise run around the Lake (6.5 miles/ 10.5 km.). 

From a current Marine Corps Officer and former U.S. National Champion in Rowing:

It is all about just getting out there and getting after it. Training for running is just like training for any other endurance type activity. Go longer but slower to get your aerobic system used to going for that long, then go faster and shorter to build muscle / push your anaerobic system to handle the pace. The two should meet in the middle and you will be all set.

Cool down-

160 meter swim with 54 lbs. of weight on my back (i.e. one almost seven year old young lady- Fei Fei Iger)!

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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #89 on: July 25, 2012, 12:49:41 PM »

Cutest training weight I've seen!
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #90 on: July 25, 2012, 03:37:56 PM »

Four laps today at Bluff Cove with a time of 36:45.  For me, this is rather good.
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dcoe
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« Reply #91 on: July 26, 2012, 09:58:04 AM »

my 13 year old son is planning on going out for JV football and track, so I decided to start training with him to prep him a bit.  Yesterday, I ran a mile with my sticks while he worked on shot put and then we ran 100 meter sprints together.  20 minutes of tiring.  just good basic cardio/aerobics.  sometimes the less fancy you get the better of you are.

love and respect
Darrin Coe
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dcoe
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« Reply #92 on: July 26, 2012, 12:00:22 PM »

good basic article on nutrition:

------------------------------------------
 
 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Macronutrients: the Importance of Carbohydrate, Protein, and Fat

WHAT ARE MACRONUTRIENTS?
Macronutrients are nutrients that provide calories or energy. Nutrients are substances needed for growth, metabolism, and for other body functions. Since “macro” means large, macronutrients are nutrients needed in large amounts. There are three macronutrients:

Carbohydrate
Protein
Fat
While each of these macronutrients provides calories, the amount of calories that each one provides varies.

Carbohydrate provides 4 calories per gram.
Protein provides 4 calories per gram.
Fat provides 9 calories per gram.

This means that if you looked at the Nutrition Facts label of a product and it said 12 grams of carbohydrate, 0 grams of fat, and 0 grams of protein per serving, you would know that this food has about 48 calories per serving (12 grams carbohydrate multiplied by 4 calories for each gram of carbohydrate = 48 calories).

Besides carbohydrate, protein, and fat the only other substance that provides calories is alcohol. Alcohol provides 7 calories per gram. Alcohol, however, is not a macronutrient because we do not need it for survival.

WHY DO WE NEED CARBOHYDRATES TO SURVIVE?
Carbohydrates are the macronutrient that we need in the largest amounts. According to the Dietary Reference Intakes published by the USDA, 45% - 65% of calories should come from carbohydrate. We need this amount of carbohydrate because:

Carbohydrates are the body’s main source of fuel.
Carbohydrates are easily used by the body for energy.
All of the tissues and cells in our body can use glucose for energy.
Carbohydrates are needed for the central nervous system, the kidneys, the brain, the muscles (including the heart) to function properly.
Carbohydrates can be stored in the muscles and liver and later used for energy.
Carbohydrates are important in intestinal health and waste elimination.
Carbohydrates are mainly found in starchy foods (like grain and potatoes), fruits, milk, and yogurt. Other foods like vegetables, beans, nuts, seeds and cottage cheese contain carbohydrates, but in lesser amounts.
Fiber refers to certain types of carbohydrates that our body cannot digest. These carbohydrates pass through the intestinal tract intact and help to move waste out of the body. Diets that are low in fiber have been shown to cause problems such as constipation and hemorrhoids and to increase the risk for certain types of cancers such as colon cancer. Diets high in fiber; however, have been shown to decrease risks for heart disease, obesity, and they help lower cholesterol. Foods high in fiber include fruits, vegetables, and whole grain products.

WHY DO WE NEED PROTEIN TO SURVIVE?
According to the Dietary Reference Intakes published by the USDA 10% - 35% of calories should come from protein. Most Americans get plenty of protein, and easily meet this need by consuming a balanced diet. We need protein for:

Growth (especially important for children, teens, and pregnant women)
Tissue repair
Immune function
Making essential hormones and enzymes
Energy when carbohydrate is not available
Preserving lean muscle mass
Protein is found in meats, poultry, fish, meat substitutes, cheese, milk, nuts, legumes, and in smaller quantities in starchy foods and vegetables.

When we eat these types of foods, our body breaks down the protein that they contain into amino acids (the building blocks of proteins). Some amino acids are essential which means that we need to get them from our diet, and others are nonessential which means that our body can make them. Protein that comes from animal sources contains all of the essential amino acids that we need. Plant sources of protein, on the other hand, do not contain all of the essential amino acids.

WHY DO WE NEED FAT TO SURVIVE?
Although fats have received a bad reputation for causing weight gain, some fat is essential for survival. According to the Dietary Reference Intakes published by the USDA 20% - 35% of calories should come from fat. We need this amount of fat for:

Normal growth and development
Energy (fat is the most concentrated source of energy)
Absorbing certain vitamins ( like vitamins A, D, E, K, and carotenoids)
Providing cushioning for the organs
Maintaining cell membranes
Providing taste, consistency, and stability to foods
Fat is found in meat, poultry, nuts, milk products, butters and margarines, oils, lard, fish, grain products and salad dressings. There are three main types of fat, saturated fat, unsaturated fat, and trans fat. Saturated fat (found in foods like meat, butter, lard, and cream) and trans fat (found in baked goods, snack foods, fried foods, and margarines) have been shown to increase your risk for heart disease. Replacing saturated and trans fat in your diet with unsaturated fat (found in foods like olive oil, avocados, nuts, and canola oil) has been shown decrease the risk of developing heart disease.

A NOTE ON MICRONUTRIENTS
Although macronutrients are very important they are not the only things that we need for survival. Our bodies also need water (6-8 glasses a day) and micronutrients. Micronutrients are nutrients that our bodies need in smaller amounts, and include vitamins and minerals. (See the Vitamins and Minerals handout for more information).


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

If you are a registered University of Illinois student and you have questions or concerns,
or need to make an appointment, please call: Dial-A-Nurse at 333-2700

 

If you are concerned about any difference in your treatment plan and the information in this handout,

you are advised to contact your health care provider.

 

Visit the McKinley Health Center Web site at: http://www.mckinley.illinois.edu

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
HEd. III-232
 © The Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois, 2008.
 03-26-08
 
macronutrients
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Darrin Coe
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #93 on: July 26, 2012, 01:30:43 PM »

I was in Whole Foods yesterday and some granola hippie type offered me a sample of BBQ sauce.  As part of his pitch, he mentioned it was "vegan".

"Did you know that vegan is a word of Apache origin?" I asked.

No, he didn't.

"It means 'bad hunter'."

Went right over his head with nary a look back, but some woman walking by thought this quite humorous.
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dcoe
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« Reply #94 on: July 26, 2012, 06:34:59 PM »

I was in Whole Foods yesterday and some granola hippie type offered me a sample of BBQ sauce.  As part of his pitch, he mentioned it was "vegan".

"Did you know that vegan is a word of Apache origin?" I asked.

No, he didn't.

"It means 'bad hunter'."

Went right over his head with nary a look back, but some woman walking by thought this quite humorous.

I don't care who you are that's funny.  Smiley

d.coe
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Point Dog
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« Reply #95 on: July 27, 2012, 05:08:25 AM »

I was in Whole Foods yesterday and some granola hippie type offered me a sample of BBQ sauce.  As part of his pitch, he mentioned it was "vegan".

"Did you know that vegan is a word of Apache origin?" I asked.

No, he didn't.

"It means 'bad hunter'."

Went right over his head with nary a look back, but some woman walking by thought this quite humorous.

" some granola hippie type"  grin
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