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Author Topic: Hello to the DBMA forum  (Read 3319 times)
sean_brandt
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Posts: 12


« on: July 19, 2005, 04:46:12 PM »

Hi everyone, I have just joined this forum.  I couldn't find any new user information so I just thought I'd introduce myself.  You may recognize my username from the Sayoc forums, and I'm aka "theMachine23" (how I strive to train, and MJ's number) on the Underground Forum @ www.mma.tv.

I watched the original DBMA tapes this weekend.  They were awesome.  One thing I was particularly interested in is the psychology of fighting as part of training, and how our civil life represses aggression in males (i.e., we don't have a tribal hierarchy established by physical dominance).  If anyone can recommend some reading material, I would appreciate it.

I train Sayoc Kali and BJJ.  

Gumagalang,
-Sean Brandt
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"You can't be afraid of the unknown and expect to progress."  (Top Dog, DBMA RCS #6)

www.sayoc.com, www.bajji.com
Crafty_Dog
Administrator
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Posts: 31806


« Reply #1 on: July 19, 2005, 10:54:58 PM »

Woof Sean:

Just a quick yip from Peru--

Try these for starters:

Konrad Lorenz:  On Aggression
Men in Groups:;  Lionel Tiger and Robin Fox


The Adventure continues,
Crafty Dog
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sean_brandt
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Posts: 12


« Reply #2 on: July 21, 2005, 10:05:22 AM »

Thanks, Crafty Dog.  I really liked seeing the tribal fighting, too.  Great footage.
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"You can't be afraid of the unknown and expect to progress."  (Top Dog, DBMA RCS #6)

www.sayoc.com, www.bajji.com
Stickgrappler
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Posts: 496

"...grappling happens. It just does." - Top Dog


« Reply #3 on: July 28, 2005, 09:31:36 AM »

a belated welcome aboard theMachine23 - i've seen that nick from somewhere before wink
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"A good stickgrappler has good stick skills, good grappling, and good stickgrappling and can keep track of all three simultaneously. This is a good trick and can be quite effective." - Marc "Crafty Dog" Denny
sean_brandt
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Posts: 12


« Reply #4 on: August 09, 2005, 03:05:06 PM »

I just checked these books out of the library.  Exactly what I was looking for, thanks Guro Crafty!

Just curious, both you and Guro Knaus are quite articulate, and if I may inquire, what are your educational backgrounds and your "day jobs"?

In the RCS series, Top Dog says he studied at Columbia...

(I have a BS in mechanical engineering)

Gumagalang,
-Sean

PS: Stickgrappler, I've always loved your website!
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"You can't be afraid of the unknown and expect to progress."  (Top Dog, DBMA RCS #6)

www.sayoc.com, www.bajji.com
Stickgrappler
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Posts: 496

"...grappling happens. It just does." - Top Dog


« Reply #5 on: August 09, 2005, 04:08:39 PM »

Quote from: sean_brandt

PS: Stickgrappler, I've always loved your website!


thank you! i just feel bad that i've not updated it in like 3 yrs. some great MA info from all over.  busier at work and in the, as they say in DBMA, Family Man stage of life, too busy to work on my site as well as surf the MA forums.
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"A good stickgrappler has good stick skills, good grappling, and good stickgrappling and can keep track of all three simultaneously. This is a good trick and can be quite effective." - Marc "Crafty Dog" Denny
Crafty_Dog
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Posts: 31806


« Reply #6 on: August 09, 2005, 05:15:46 PM »

Sean:

I cracked up when I saw the Columbia Alum mag in Eric's truck the first day we met.

My education:

Julia Richman Public HS, NYC
U. of PA '77 B.A. Major: International Relations (specialization in Mexico/Latin America,  Minor in Econ)
Columbia Law School '81 J.D.

But then I went for the big bucks of stickfighting,
Crafty Dog
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Tulisan
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Posts: 24


« Reply #7 on: August 09, 2005, 10:53:48 PM »

cheesy  cheesy  cheesy  Cool
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He that hath no sword,
let him sell his garment and buy one.
St. Luke
sean_brandt
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Posts: 12


« Reply #8 on: August 10, 2005, 05:28:40 PM »

Guro Marc, I forgot to mention I'm an engineer by day, at a software company, where I pride myself on being a "nerd" (read: academic).  And when my coworkers hear of my interest in stickfighting (or martial arts), they think I'm crazy or violent.  Football, rugby, all the "normal" hobbies aren't a big deal...yet in all my martial arts training, I've had far less injuries than my friends who play football.

Stickgrappler, that is a stage of life I am on the cusp of entering.  I have a few more years before my wife and I start our (human) family (we have 2 pups!), so I'm trying to get as much training in as possible.  I just set up a small home dojo, which is 99% done, so I can train at my house, even when we do have kids.  And of course train the kids too!

Last request for now:
Do you guys recommend any videos (like NOVA or National Geographic) that show tribal/primitive men, with fighting (like that in the RCS series)?  I imagine this is a small market...

Gumagalang,
-Sean Brandt
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"You can't be afraid of the unknown and expect to progress."  (Top Dog, DBMA RCS #6)

www.sayoc.com, www.bajji.com
kuraiokami
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Posts: 19


« Reply #9 on: August 19, 2005, 02:49:38 PM »

Quote
Guro Marc, I forgot to mention I'm an engineer by day, at a software company, where I pride myself on being a "nerd" (read: academic). And when my coworkers hear of my interest in stickfighting (or martial arts), they think I'm crazy or violent.


LOL..  i get that alot at work too, but then I do work as a Civil Engineer in the Land Development/Construction industry.

Rich "C-Hell Hound"
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A pipe gives a wise man time to think,
and a fool something to stick in his mouth.
bedens67
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Posts: 8


« Reply #10 on: August 31, 2005, 01:44:41 PM »

Quote from: sean_brandt
Guro Marc, I forgot to mention I'm an engineer by day, at a software company, where I pride myself on being a "nerd" (read: academic).  And when my coworkers hear of my interest in stickfighting (or martial arts), they think I'm crazy or violent.  Football, rugby, all the "normal" hobbies aren't a big deal...yet in all my martial arts training, I've had far less injuries than my friends who play football.

 
I probably have more injuries, but they tend to be less major (short of the occassional broken toe Smiley) than those participating in other sports. No shortage of bad knees or ankles from football, basketball, etc. Me, I just quietly have bruises, muscle pulls, and the like... I think this "hobby" also lends us to be more tolerant of injury / pain as a fact of life... We had one 20 year old who had crutches for a couple of weeks for a mildly sprained ankle gotten while running, while I just used the walls for support for a couple of days while nursing a sprained MCL... Smiley

Quote from: sean_brandt
Stickgrappler, that is a stage of life I am on the cusp of entering.  I have a few more years before my wife and I start our (human) family (we have 2 pups!), so I'm trying to get as much training in as possible.  I just set up a small home dojo, which is 99% done, so I can train at my house, even when we do have kids.  And of course train the kids too!


In that phase too... Been constantly training for 6 years, including teaching... Time to take the back seat for a while and train a lot at home, and occasionally at the school, while I can be Dad for my 8 and 12 year old boys (who also do martial arts though Smiley)...

- Bert
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