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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #450 on: January 07, 2015, 04:31:26 PM »

 Tactics Suggest Overseas Jihadi Training in Paris Newspaper Shooting
Analysis
January 7, 2015 | 14:06 GMT Print Text Size
French soldiers patrol in front of the Eiffel Tower on Jan. 7, 2015 in Paris. (JOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
Analysis

Three gunmen killed 12 people and critically wounded five in an attack this morning at the headquarters of the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. Among the dead were two French police officers assigned to protect the office. The magazine is widely known for lampooning Islam and the Prophet Mohammed, and it has paid a high price for it. The magazine's Paris office was completely destroyed by a Molotov cocktail attack in November 2011 in response to a previous edition that contained caricatures of the Prophet Mohammed. The magazine's editors refused to tone down their content despite repeated threats, the past attack and requests by the French government not to publish provocative images.

This attitude meant that they continued to be in the crosshairs of jihadists in recent years. For example, the 10th edition of al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula's Inspire magazine contained a hit list of people who had insulted the Prophet Mohammed. That list included Stephane Charbonnier, the editor of Charlie Hebdo, whom, according to early reports of today's attack, is among the dead. One of the attackers was alleged to have shouted out, "You tell the media it was al Qaeda in Yemen" during the assault, Britain's Channel 4 News reported.

That such an attack occurred in Paris is not surprising. Indeed, the jihadist threat in France and other parts of Europe has been acute for some time. From photos and videos of the attack it appears that the gunmen were trained, from the way they handled their weapons, moved and shot. This raises the possibility that they had received training in using light arms (perhaps at a jihadist camp overseas) or had fought with jihadists overseas.

The method used in the attacks is also not surprising. Jihadists returning from overseas rarely receive training in advanced terrorist tradecraft, but almost all of them receive training in small arms and small unit tactics. These attackers conducted a successful attack using what they knew instead of attempting to conduct an attack beyond their capability and failing as a result.

That the attack involved a group instead of a lone gunman is also unsurprising. The nature of the jihadist threat is slightly different in Europe than it is in the United States because of differences in the Muslim communities. In the United States, where the Muslim community is more integrated and less likely to be isolated in their own districts, plotters tend to be more self-radicalized and aspirational. Once they become radicalized — frequently via the Internet — it is quite common for them to be arrested as they seek assistance with their plots from individuals who are FBI agents or police informants working on sting operations.

Because of Europe's concentrated and disenfranchised Muslim population, it is not difficult for radicalized European Muslims to find confederates who are not police informants. Even more aspirational and inept groups — such as the four men who were arrested in April 2012, in Luton, United Kingdom, and who pled guilty to plotting to attack a British army base on March 1, 2013 — can be part of a larger radicalized community and have friends and relatives who have been involved in prior plots or who have traveled overseas to fight jihad. This was true for Toulouse shooter Mohammed Merah. Although he conducted his shooting attacks alone, Merah had long been part of a larger militant community and had traveled to places like Pakistan and Afghanistan to train and fight.

The gunmen, who are still at large, can be expected to continue to attack until they are killed or captured. They may or may not have been acting under direct orders from a jihadist group but were in all likelihood working in solidarity with either al Qaeda or the Islamic State. There will probably be some sort of claim of responsibility, in which their ideological affiliation will be made clear, beyond shouted statements reported from the scene.

The attacks happened at a time when the role of Muslim minorities in France is the subject of a heated debate, especially after the publication of a novel that depicts a Muslim president governing France. It also happens at a time when the anti-immigration National Front is seeing record levels of popular support and will probably be a serious contender for the presidential elections of 2017. The situation of Muslim minorities is also controversial in Germany, where anti-Islam protests have taken place in recent months, and in the Netherlands, where the far-right Party of Freedom proposes tighter immigration laws.

Such attacks will continue in the West as long as jihadism survives as an ideology. They will be limited in scope but intended to cause terrorist theater that spills well beyond the limits of the attack to create vicarious victims. Because of this continuing threat, citizens should practice appropriate situational awareness and be prepared to properly respond to danger.

Read more: Tactics Suggest Overseas Jihadi Training in Paris Newspaper Shooting | Stratfor
Follow us: @stratfor on Twitter | Stratfor on Facebook
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objectivist1
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« Reply #451 on: January 08, 2015, 07:23:23 AM »

The Charlie Hebdo Jihad Massacre: Time to Stand for Free Speech

Posted By Robert Spencer On January 8, 2015

Islamic jihad gunmen have murdered twelve people in the Paris offices of the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. One of the jihad murderers in Paris shouted, “We have avenged the prophet Muhammad,” making it abundantly clear that this was a jihad attack and a response to Charlie Hebdo’s daring to mock Muhammad.

It is virtually certain that the mainstream media response to this heinous mass murder will be calls for the West to restrict its freedom of expression, and not publish material that offends Muslims. If you think that is unlikely, remember that it has happened before. When the Obama Administration blamed the Benghazi jihad attack on a video about Muhammad, there were calls in the mainstream media for restrictions on the freedom of speech. Eric Posner in Slate derided the First Amendment’s “sacred status” and declared that “Americans need to learn that the rest of the world—and not just Muslims—see no sense in the First Amendment. Even other Western nations take a more circumspect position on freedom of expression than we do, realizing that often free speech must yield to other values and the need for order.”

In the Los Angeles Times, Sarah Chayes noted that “the current standard for restricting speech — or punishing it after it has in fact caused violence — was laid out in the 1969 case Brandenburg vs. Ohio. Under the narrower guidelines, only speech that has the intent and the likelihood of inciting imminent violence or lawbreaking can be limited.” She then argued at length that the Muhammad video did indeed have the likelihood of inciting imminent violence, and should thus be banned. Her article was a sleazy and dishonest sleight of hand, as the law is that speech that calls for violence can be banned, whereas she was arguing that speech that doesn’t call for violence, but that might make people who oppose it behave violently, should be banned. That would be to enshrine the heckler’s veto into law and to enable Islamic jihadis to silence anyone they disliked simply by killing someone.

And in the Washington Post, the gutter thug Nathan Lean (who has repeatedly published on Twitter what he thinks is my home address and places I frequent, in a transparent attempt to endanger me and those around me, and/or to frighten me into silence) declared: “The voices of hate that hope to fracture our society along religious lines should have no place in our public discourse.” Who would decide which are the “voices of hate” that should be silenced? People like Nathan Lean, of course – that is, purveyors of the “Islamophobia” myth who are determined to silence anyone and everyone who dares raise the slightest objection to the advancing jihad.

Now, as twelve people have been gunned down by Islamic jihadists in Paris, we will hear more such calls for restrictions on the freedom of speech. The likes of Posner, Chayes, and Lean will blame Charlie Hebdo and call on Western media to adopt Sharia blasphemy laws, and refrain from saying or doing anything that Muslims would find offensive — including, of course, honest discussion about how Islamic jihadists use Islamic texts and teachings to justify things like the Charlie Hebdo massacre.

This is the time to say, “Enough.” This is the time to say, We are going to stand for the freedom of speech. No more people are going to die for saying things that offend Muslims. The capacity to be offended and not respond with violence is essential to a pluralistic society, and the freedom of speech itself is our foremost protection against tyranny that would do whatever it willed and crush all dissent.

It is time to stand, or free speech will be lost, and when it is lost, all will be lost.

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"You have enemies?  Good.  That means that you have stood up for something, sometime in your life." - Winston Churchill.
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« Reply #452 on: January 10, 2015, 05:31:52 PM »

http://www.cnn.com/2015/01/10/europe/charlie-hebdo-paris-shooting/index.html
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objectivist1
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« Reply #453 on: January 10, 2015, 05:35:33 PM »

See video of discussion below:

www.jihadwatch.org/2015/01/video-robert-spencer-on-hannity-on-sharia-no-go-zones-in-france-and-the-charlie-hebdo-jihadists
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"You have enemies?  Good.  That means that you have stood up for something, sometime in your life." - Winston Churchill.
Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #454 on: January 11, 2015, 03:19:00 AM »

Reliability of source unknown, but footage seems legit

https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=697860583692539
« Last Edit: January 11, 2015, 08:54:23 PM by Crafty_Dog » Logged
prentice crawford
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« Reply #455 on: January 11, 2015, 08:08:22 AM »

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/12/world/europe/paris-attacks-charlie-hebdo.html Western news media down playing anti-terror protest in Paris today, expecting 1 million protesters.
                                 P.C.
Amid Heavy Security, Huge Crowds Gather for Unity March in Paris


By DAN BILEFSKY and MAÏA de la BAUMEJAN. 11, 2015

After Terrorist Attacks, Many French Muslims Wonder: What Now?JAN. 10, 2015

Jihadists and Supporters Take to Social Media to Praise Attack on Charlie Hebdo JAN. 10, 2015

Open Source: Muslim Employee of Kosher Market in Paris Praised for Hiding Customers From GunmanJAN. 10, 2015

Hayat Boumeddiene

French Premier Declares ‘War’ on Radical Islam as Paris Girds for RallyJAN. 10, 2015

 
PARIS — Hundreds of thousands of people poured into the streets of Paris to join top French officials and world leaders for a rally and march under extraordinary security in a government-sponsored show of unity and defiance after a series of terrorist attacks.

The French government said it would mobilize 500 additional troops and hundreds more police officers to provide security at the rally, intended to galvanize the shaken country. In the area around Place de la République, where the march was starting, snipers could be seen on rooftops, and security officers were seen checking sewers for explosives. The police swarmed the area, and several subway stops and streets were blocked off.

Officials said that public transport in Paris would be free all day Sunday to encourage participation in the march.


Prime Minister Manuel Valls declared on Saturday that France was at “war” with radical Islam after harrowing attacks that claimed the lives of 17 victims. Three gunmen who said they were acting on behalf of Al Qaeda and other radical Islamist groups were killed by the police on Friday in two separate raids. One gunman had taken hostages at a Jewish supermarket in Paris, and the two others had holed themselves up in a print shop in Dammartin-en-Goële, northeast of the French capital.

 
Mr. Valls called on the French to take to the streets to show solidarity with the victims and to stand behind the idea that republican values of free speech and freedom of expression are the most potent bulwark against terrorists.

“Indignation. Resistance. Solidarity. I am Charlie” read an invitation to the event that was circulating on social media. The organizers said the rally was to show support for freedom of the press and freedom of speech, and to reinforce the message that France and the French would not be cowed by terrorists.

Officials from across Europe and elsewhere, including Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany, Prime Minister David Cameron of Britain and Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu of Turkey, have said they planned to attend the rally.


The president of the Palestinian Authority, Mahmoud Abbas, and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel also said they would be present.

Security officials in France and across Europe remained on high alert for copycat attacks, even as a French prosecutor said that five people detained in the wake of the terrorist attacks had been released.

Early on Sunday, a German newspaper that had reprinted cartoons from the French weekly Charlie Hebdo lampooning the Prophet Muhammad was the target of an apparent arson attack, the newspaper reported on its website. It said there were no injuries.

The daily, the Hamburger Morgenpost, had published three cartoons that had been previously published by Charlie Hebdo, whose offices were attacked Wednesday in Paris. “This much freedom must be possible!” the headline read.

The Associated Press, citing police sources, said that the police in Germany had detained two men in connection with the Hamburger Morgenpost attack.

Several other national and local German newspapers published the cartoons and were placed under police protection, the news agency reported.

On Sunday morning, the French Interior Ministry held what it described as a security summit meeting, bringing together top intelligence and law enforcement officials from across Europe and North America to discuss ways to combat and contain terrorism. Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. was among those attending.

Following the meeting, Bernard Cazeneuve, the French interior minister, said that the current European legislation aimed at fighting against terrorism “wasn’t enough” and called for a better European system for tracking potential jihadists and terrorists.

He also said the European ministers had agreed on a need for better cooperation with Internet companies to monitor, detect and remove any “illicit” material that could encourage terrorism.

Mr. Holder announced that the White House would convene an international forum on Feb. 18 to discuss new means of countering terrorism. The White House, in a statement, said the meeting would address domestic and international measures “to prevent violent extremists and their supporters from radicalizing, recruiting, or inspiring individuals or groups in the United States and abroad to commit acts of violence.”

The challenges raised by the attacks — including the threats of foreign fighters and the challenges of violent extremism — figured prominently at the meeting. On Saturday, French cabinet ministers held an emergency meeting in Paris to discuss measures to prevent other attacks.

The mass rally has created a major security headache for the French authorities, two days after security forces killed Amedy Coulibaly, a heavily armed gunman who is suspected of shooting and killing four hostages at a kosher supermarket near Porte de Vincennes in eastern Paris, and two brothers, Saïd and Chérif Kouachi, who are suspected of killing 12 people on Wednesday at the offices of Charlie Hebdo.

On Sunday, counterterrorist officials in France said they were continuing to investigate links between Mr. Coulibaly and the Kouachi brothers, the source of their funding and weapons, and whether the suspects were part of a dormant sleeper cell that had been activated.

The investigation is a challenge for French law enforcement officials, who are already grappling with the more than 1,000 French citizens who last year went or planned to join jihadists in Syria and Iraq. The events of the past week appear to confirm fears that some could return to wage attacks on French soil.

The attacks fanned anxieties across France and Europe and raised questions about why the authorities had failed to thwart an attack by suspects who were known to the French security services.

While the rally on Sunday was intended to help unite the country, it has fanned some divisions. Marine Le Pen, the leader of the far-right National Front, who was not invited, urged her followers to stay away, saying that the demonstration had been usurped for political ends “by parties which represent what the French hate: partisan spirit, electioneering and indecent polemic.”

On Saturday, hundreds of thousands of people marched in Paris, Toulouse, Nice and other cities in a show of solidarity, and rallies were held in places as far away as Athens, Madrid, Madagascar, Tel Aviv and Bangui, Central African Republic.

The French authorities on Saturday intensified the hunt for the companion of one of the killers, only to learn that she appeared to have fled to Turkey and probably went to Syria days before the first assault in Paris on Wednesday. The police had suspected that the woman — Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, the girlfriend of Mr. Coulibaly — might have played a role in one or more of the attacks.

In Germany on Saturday, an estimated 35,000 people demonstrated in Dresden in support of tolerance and an open society, nearly double the number that attended the protests of a local group, Pegida, against what it called the “Islamization” of German society. Demonstrators on Saturday held a moment of silence for the victims of last week’s attacks in Paris, and many carried signs in support of the slain satirists from Charlie Hebdo.

In her weekly podcast, Ms. Merkel called for renewed efforts at unity among the European Union’s 28 members. “We are only strong and convincing when we stand together,” she said. Leaders of Germany’s Jewish and Muslim communities, backed by leading political parties, have called for Germans to attend rallies in support of tolerance on Monday in more than 20 cities across the country.

The rally in Paris on Sunday, which was to begin at 3 p.m. local time at the Place de la République, will be led by relatives of the victims of last week’s attacks.

The attacks have spread alarm among the Jewish community in France, which was already reeling from a spate of anti-Semitic attacks in the country, including on synagogues and Jewish shops last year, at the time of an Israeli incursion in Gaza. On Sunday, President François Hollande, who has labeled the attack at the kosher supermarket a horrific act of anti-Semitism.

In a meeting on Sunday with Roger Cukierman, president of the Representative Council of Jewish Institutions in France, Mr. Hollande said that the government would protect Jewish schools and synagogues with army troops if necessary, and that it was committed to the security of France’s 500,000 Jews.

Mr. Hollande was expected to go to the Great Synagogue of Paris, also known as the Synagogue de la Victoire, after the unity march to convey his support for the Jewish community.

Thousands of Jews left France last year for Israel amid concerns about security, and in recent days Israeli officials have said that the recent attacks could prompt a new wave of French Jews arriving in the country. On Saturday, Mr. Netanyahu said that Israel was the home of French Jews, and on Sunday morning, as he was leaving Israel for the march in Paris, he repeated his invitation to French Jews to move to Israel.

“I am going to Paris in order to participate in the rally, along with world leaders, for a renewed struggle against the Islamic terrorism that is threatening all of humanity, which I have been calling for years,” the Israeli leader said.

Mr. Netanyahu said that he would attend a second rally, of Paris’s Jewish community, in the evening.

“I will say there that any Jew who wants to immigrate to Israel will be received here with open arms,” he said.

The French National Assembly is to hold a debate and vote on Tuesday on whether France should continue participating in American-led airstrikes in Iraq against the Islamic State.

France joined the campaign in September, and Islamic State militants have asked their supporters to attack Europeans in retaliation for the strikes. In September, a group aligned with the Islamic State beheaded Hervé Gourdel, a 55-year-old mountaineering guide from the French city of Nice, who had been kidnapped by fighters in Algeria.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #456 on: January 11, 2015, 04:04:37 PM »

http://www.parismatch.com/Actu/Societe/Lassana-le-heros-de-Vincennes-686818
« Last Edit: January 14, 2015, 09:55:20 AM by Crafty_Dog » Logged
DougMacG
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« Reply #457 on: January 13, 2015, 11:12:04 PM »

This is quite a good interview with a journalist who was a witness on the scene in Paris.http://www.powerlineblog.com/archives/2015/01/the-power-line-show-episode-7-claire-berlinski-reporting-from-paris.php
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #458 on: January 16, 2015, 11:35:30 AM »



http://www.cnn.com/2015/01/15/world/belgium-anti-terror-operation/index.html
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #459 on: January 17, 2015, 10:36:30 PM »

Immigration and Islam: Europe’s Crisis of Faith
France and the rest of Western Europe have never honestly confronted the issues raised by Muslim immigration
Two women talk as police officers stand in front of the courthouse in Meaux, near Paris, on Sept. 22, 2011. The court convicted two other women for publicly wearing Islamic veils; France banned face coverings earlier that year. ENLARGE
By Christopher Caldwell
Jan. 16, 2015 6:14 p.m. ET
476 COMMENTS

The terrorist assault on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo on Jan. 7 may have been organized by al Qaeda’s affiliate in Yemen. But the attack, along with another at a Paris kosher market days later, was carried out by French Muslims descended from recent waves of North African and West African immigration. Well before the attacks, which left 17 dead, the French were discussing the possibility that tensions with the country’s own Muslim community were leading France toward some kind of armed confrontation.

Consider Éric Zemmour, a slashing television debater and a gifted polemicist. His history of the collapse of France’s postwar political order, “Le suicide français,” was No. 1 on the best-seller lists for several weeks this fall. “Today, our elites think it’s France that needs to change to suit Islam, and not the other way around,” Mr. Zemmour said on a late-night talk show in October, “and I think that with this system, we’re headed toward civil war.”

More recently, Michel Houellebecq published “Submission,” a novel set in the near future. In it, the re-election of France’s current president, François Hollande, has drawn recruits to a shadowy group proclaiming its European identity. “Sooner or later, civil war between Muslims and the rest of the population is inevitable,” a sympathizer explains. “They draw the conclusion that the sooner this war begins, the better chance they’ll have of winning it.” Published, as it happened, on the morning of the attacks, Mr. Houellebecq’s novel replaced Mr. Zemmour’s at the top of the best-seller list, where it remains.

Two days after the Charlie Hebdo killings, there was a disturbing indication on Le Monde’s website of how French people were thinking. One item about the killing vastly outpaced all others in popularity. The reactions of Europe’s leaders was shared about 5,000 times, tales of Muslim schoolchildren with mixed feelings about 6,000, a detailed account of the Charlie Hebdo editorial meeting ended by the attack, 9,000. Topping them all, shared 28,000 times, was a story about reprisals: “Mosques become targets, French Muslims uneasy.” Those clicks are the sound of French fear that something larger may be under way.
Marine Le Pen of France’s Front National acknowledges supporters on Nov. 30. Populist parties are rising across Europe as voters feel abandoned by the mainstream political class. ENLARGE
Marine Le Pen of France’s Front National acknowledges supporters on Nov. 30. Populist parties are rising across Europe as voters feel abandoned by the mainstream political class. Getty Images

France’s problem has elements of a military threat, a religious conflict and a violent civil-rights movement. It is not unique. Every country of Western Europe has a version. For a half-century, millions of immigrants from North and sub-Saharan Africa have arrived, lured by work, welfare, marriage and a refuge from war. There are about 20 million Muslims in Europe, with some 5 million of them in France, according to the demographer Michèle Tribalat. That amounts to roughly 8% of the population of France, compared with about 5% of both the U.K. and Germany.
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Such a migration is not something that Europeans would have countenanced at any other moment in their generally xenophobic history, and the politicians who permitted it to happen were not lucky. The movement coincided with a collapse in European birthrates, which lent the immigration an unstoppable momentum, and with the rise of modern political Islam, which gave the diaspora a radical edge.
Related Reading

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    Timeline of Terror Attacks in Past 20 Years

Just why Europe has had such trouble can be partially understood by contrasting it with the U.S. Europe’s welfare states are more developed and, until recently, more open to noncitizens, so illegal or “underground” immigration has been low. But employment rates have been low, too. If Americans have traditionally considered immigrants the hardest-working segment of their population, Europeans have had the opposite stereotype. In the early 1970s, 2 million of the 3 million foreigners in Germany were in the labor force; by the turn of this century, 2 million of 7.5 million were.

Europe was not just disoriented by the trauma of World War II. It was also demoralized and paralyzed by the memory of Nazism and the continuing dismantling of colonialism. Leaders felt that they lacked the moral standing to address problems that were as plain as the noses on their faces—just as U.S. leaders ducked certain racial issues in the wake of desegregation.

Europeans drew the wrong lessons from the American civil-rights movement. In the U.S., there was race and there was immigration. They were separate matters that could (at least until recently) be disentangled by people of good faith. In Europe, the two problems have long been inseparable. Voters who worried about immigration were widely accused of racism, or later of “Islamophobia.”

In France, antiracism set itself squarely against freedom of speech. The passage of the 1990 Gayssot Law, which punished denial of the Holocaust, was a watershed. Activist lobbies sought to expand such protections by limiting discussion of a variety of historical events—the slave trade, colonialism, foreign genocides. This was backed up by institutional muscle. In the 1980s, President François Mitterrand’s Socialist party created a nongovernmental organization called SOS Racisme to rally minority voters and to hound those who worked against their interests.

Older bodies such as the communist-inspired Movement against Racism and for Friendship Among the Peoples made a specialty of threatening (and sometimes carrying out) lawsuits against European intellectuals for the slightest trespasses against political correctness: the late Italian journalist Oriana Fallaci for her post-9/11 lament “The Rage and the Pride,” the philosopher Alain Finkielkraut for doubting that the 2005 riots in France’s suburban ghettos were due to unemployment, the Russia scholar Hélène Carrère d’Encausse for speculating about the role of polygamy in the problems of West African immigrants.

Speech codes have done little to facilitate entry into the workforce for immigrants and their children or to reduce crime. But they have intimidated European voting publics, insulated politicians from criticism and turned certain crucial matters into taboos. Immigrant and ethnic issues have become tightly bound to the issue of building the multinational European Union, which has removed vast areas of policy from voter accountability. “Anti-European” sentiments continue to rise.
A woman holds up a sign that says, ‘I am Charlie, I am Jewish, I am a Muslim, I am French’ during a rally in Paris on Jan. 11. ENLARGE
A woman holds up a sign that says, ‘I am Charlie, I am Jewish, I am a Muslim, I am French’ during a rally in Paris on Jan. 11. Agence France-Presse/Getty Images

So impressed were the Europeans with their own generosity that they failed to notice that the population of second- and third-generation immigrants was growing bigger, stronger, more unified and less inclined to take moral instruction. This is partly a demographic problem. Since the fall of the Berlin Wall, Western Europe has had some of the lowest birthrates of any civilization on record. Without immigration, Europe’s population would fall by a hundred million by midcentury, according to U.N. estimates.

When mass immigration began, Europeans did not give much thought to the influence of Islam. In the 1960s, there might have been worries that a North African was, say, a Nasserite Arab nationalist, but not that he was a would-be jihadist. Too many Europeans forgot that people carry a long past within them—and that, even when they do not, they sometimes wish to. Materialistic, acquisitive, averse to God and family, Europe’s culture appeared cold, dead and unsatisfying to many Muslims. It failed to satisfy a lot of non-Muslims too, but until they ran out of borrowed money with the 2008 crash, they could avoid facing it squarely.

Europeans didn’t know enough about the cultural background of Muslims to browbeat them the same way they did the native-born. Muslims felt none of the historic guilt over fascism and colonialism that so affected non-Muslim Europeans. They had a freedom of political action that Europeans lacked.

As European politics grew duller and the stakes lower, many political romantics looked enviously at the aspirations of the Muslim poor, particularly regarding Palestine. You could see a hint of this last weekend in the BBC journalist who interrupted a mourning Frenchwoman, distraught about the targeting of Jews for murder at a kosher supermarket, to say that “the Palestinians suffer hugely at Jewish hands.”

In a world that prized “identity,” Muslim immigrants were aristocrats. Those who became radicalized developed the most monstrous kind of self-regard. A chilling moment in the most recent terrorist drama came when the TV network RTL phoned the kosher supermarket where the Malian-French hostage-taker, Amedy Coulibaly, was holding his victims at gunpoint. He refused to talk but hung up the phone carelessly. The newspaper Le Monde was able to publish a transcript of the strutting stupidity to which he then gave expression:

“They’re always trying to make you believe that Muslims are terrorists. Me, I’m born in France. If they hadn’t been attacked elsewhere, I wouldn’t be here…Think of the people who had Bashar al-Assad in Syria. They were torturing people…We didn’t intervene for years…Then bombers, coalition of 50,000 countries, all that…Why did they do that?”

The Muslim community is not to be confused with the terrorists it produces. But left to its own, it probably lacks the means, the inclination and the courage to stand up to the faction, however small, that supports terrorism. In 1995, there were riots among French Muslims after the arrest of Khalid Kelkal of Lyon, who had planted several bombs—in a train station, near a Jewish school, on a high-speed rail track. In 2012, when Mohamed Merah of Toulouse was killed by police after having gunned down soldiers, a rabbi and three Jewish elementary-school children, his brother professed himself “proud,” and his father threatened to file a wrongful-death suit against the government.
Populist parties like the U.K. Independence Party wind up, by voter demand, placing immigration and multiculturalism at the center of their concerns. ENLARGE
Populist parties like the U.K. Independence Party wind up, by voter demand, placing immigration and multiculturalism at the center of their concerns. PA Wire/Zuma Press

And when Charlie Hebdo printed a memorial cover this week that had a picture of its controversial cartoon character “Muhammad” on it, it was as if the attacks had never happened: Muslim community spokesmen, even moderate ones, issued dire warnings about the insult to them and their coreligionists. To many Muslims in France and the rest of Europe, the new drawings were evidence not that the terrorists had failed to kill a magazine but that the French had failed to heed a warning. Impressive though the post-attack memorial marches were, “the working classes and the North African and West African immigrant kids weren’t there,” as the president of France’s Young Socialists told the newspaper Le Temps.

It may seem harsh to criticize the French in their time of grief, but they are responding today with tools that have failed them in previous crises. They reflexively look at their own supposed bigotry as always, somehow, the ultimate cause of Islamist terrorism, and they limit their efforts to making minority communities feel more at home.

The mysterious riots of 2005 in France—which lasted for almost three weeks, during which the rioters made no claims and put forward no leaders—were chalked up to deprivation. The French media responded with an effort to hire more nonwhite news anchors and reporters, and the government promised to spend more in the suburbs. Now, after the murders in Paris, the contradictions continue to accumulate:

• On religion: Mr. Hollande has insisted that the attacks have “nothing to do with Islam.” At the same time, Prime Minister Manuel Valls speaks of “moderate Islam” and rails against “conservatism and obscurantism”—as if the violence had everything to do with Islam, and even with religious devotion in general.

• On spying: Some in the French government blame intelligence failures, since the secret services tracked the Charlie Hebdo killers Said and Chérif Kouachi until last summer. But government officials boast of about their principled unwillingness to legislate a “Patriot Act a la française”—even as they draw daily on intelligence gathered by the U.S.

• On religious hatred: Justice Minister Christiane Taubira has announced an all-out assault on “racism and anti-Semitism,” promising that those who attack others because of their religion will be fought “with rigor and resolve.” In theory, this sounds like a promise to protect Jewish shoppers from getting killed at their neighborhood grocery stores. In practice, it will mean placing limits on any inquiry into the inner dynamics of Muslim communities and may wind up increasing the terrorist threat rather than diminishing it.
More Saturday Essays

    What the World Will Speak in 2115
    An Unserious Look at the Year Ahead
    The Spirit of the 1914 Christmas Truce
    Women at Work: A Guide for Men

What continues is the deafness of France’s government and mainstream parties to public opinion (and popular suffrage) on the issues of immigration and a multiethnic society. Mr. Hollande’s approval ratings have risen since the attacks, but they are still below 30%. In January 2013, according to the newsweekly L’Express, 74% of the French said that Islam “is not compatible with French society.” Though that number fell last year, it is almost certain to be higher now.

Voters all across Europe feel abandoned by the mainstream political class, which is why populist parties are everywhere on the rise. Whatever the biggest initial grievance of these parties—opposition to the European Union for the U.K. Independence Party, opposition to the euro for Alternative für Deutschland, corruption for Italy’s 5 Star Movement—all wind up, by voter demand, placing immigration and multiculturalism at the center of their concerns.

In France, it is the Front National, a party with antecedents on the far right, that has been the big beneficiary. In the last national election, for seats in the European Parliament, the FN, led by Marine Le Pen (daughter of the party’s founder, Jean-Marie Le Pen), topped the polls. But the ruling Socialists froze the Front National out of the recent national ceremonies of mourning, limiting participation in the Paris rally to those parties it deemed “republican.” This risks damaging the cause of republicanism more than the cause of Le Pen and her followers.

Acts of terrorism can occur without shaking a country to its core. These latest attacks, awful as they were, could be taken in stride if the majority in France felt itself secure. But it does not. Thanks to wars in Iraq, Syria and Yemen, thousands of young people who share the indignation of the Kouachis and Coulibaly are now battle-hardened and heavily armed.

France, like Europe more broadly, has been careless for decades. It has not recognized that free countries are for peoples strong enough to defend them. A willingness to join hands and to march in solidarity is a good first response to the awful events of early January. It will not be enough.

Mr. Caldwell is a senior editor at the Weekly Standard and the author of “Reflections on the Revolution in Europe: Immigration, Islam and the West.”
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DougMacG
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« Reply #460 on: January 25, 2015, 12:00:00 PM »

Bobby Jindal's allegation of "No Go" zones in Europe set off a firestorm last week here on the left, and in parts of Europe. 
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/01/19/bobby-jindal-muslims_n_6503998.html
http://mediamatters.org/blog/2015/01/21/bobby-jindal-defends-no-go-zones-myth-foxs-john/202225

"Muslim immigrants have created "no-go zones" in Europe where non-Muslims are not welcome."
http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2015/01/15/jindal-no-go-zones-muslim-europe/21825173/

Others have said entire cities such as Birmingham are such, and have had to back down from erroneous statements.  The mayor of Paris is suing Fox News. http://www.politico.com/blogs/media/2015/01/city-of-paris-to-sue-fox-news-201302.html  (I assume these Paris "suburbs" are not in Paris.)

Here on the forum, we have documented the looting of Jewish grocery stores in France, the car fires of Clichy-sous-Bois, Villiers-le-Bel, the inability of Sweden to host a Davis Cup tennis match versus Israel, and massive riots that broke out over that.   
http://dogbrothers.com/phpBB2/index.php?topic=977.msg26295#msg26295 
http://dogbrothers.com/phpBB2/index.php?topic=977.msg28181#msg28181
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kfK7Yal64S0&x-yt-ts=1421914688&x-yt-cl=84503534
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cxX27Pe-AH0&x-yt-ts=1421914688&x-yt-cl=84503534

I don't know about no-go zones in the UK, but bring forward this post documenting 55 police no go zones in Sweden:
http://dogbrothers.com/phpBB2/index.php?topic=977.msg84433#msg84433
A place formerly known as Sweden now has 55 Police No Go Zones
« Reply #435 on: October 30, 2014»
The Swedish police has released a map of 55 areas where they publicly admit to having surrendered control to the criminal gangs. The report describes outright attacks on police officers trying to enter the areas, which is a step up from the previous problem with attacks on mailmen, fire trucks, ambulances and similar services; it used to be that fire trucks and ambulances had to wait for police escort to enter the areas, but now the police themselves need protection.

The no-go areas heavily coincides with the map of the 186 “exclusion areas” aka. crowded, predominantly muslim immigrant ghettos, where education is low, employment is lower, and the only local business thriving is that of the drug dealing (which takes place openly and continues to do brisk business.)
http://swedenreport.org/2014/10/29/swedish-police-55-official-no-go-zones/
http://polisen.se/Global/www%20och%20Intrapolis/Rapporter-utredningar/01%20Polisen%20nationellt/Ovriga%20rapporter-utredningar/Kriminella%20natverk%20med%20stor%20paverkan%20i%20lokalsamhallet%20Sekretesspr%2014.pdf
http://www.svd.se/opinion/ledarsidan/55-no-go-zoner-i-sverige-minner-om-parallellsamhallen_4051399.svd
---------------------------

On a related matter, I see that Powerline yesterday picked up on my 2013 post of "A Jew in Malmo, Sweden":
http://dogbrothers.com/phpBB2/index.php?topic=977.msg76275#msg76275
http://www.powerlineblog.com/archives/2015/01/jewish-like-me-in-malmo.php
Maybe not really a Jew in Malmo, but a Scandinavian wore a kippah to see the reaction.
--------------------------

My thought on this controversy is that it is good to force people like the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and the Mayor of Paris to make sure and make pubic that this is NOT happening!  That is Jindal's point, no-go zones within western allies must not stand.  Religious intolerance in places like Tehran and Hebron is enough.
--------------------------
As stated elsewhere by ccp, this isn't about militant Islamists attacking Jews.  It is about militant Islamists attacking Jews first.  Their war is against all others.
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G M
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« Reply #461 on: January 25, 2015, 12:23:05 PM »

The leftists in europe attack fox news because fox won't machine gun them in their homes and offices.
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #462 on: January 25, 2015, 02:56:20 PM »


Excellent contribution Doug.
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objectivist1
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« Reply #463 on: January 25, 2015, 03:01:43 PM »

To GM's point - the majority of the world's news media - with few exceptions - has been self-censoring itself, essentially surrendering to the terrorists.  This is NOT a good sign.
As I've commented before - it's looking more and more like 1938 in Europe these days - and not just in Europe.  The level of denial in the U.S. is staggering as well.
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« Reply #464 on: January 25, 2015, 04:25:53 PM »

The authorities in the various countries don't admit the "no-go" terminology.  But read the Swedish Police report in Swedish (with the help of Google translate) and see if these same things are not happening at times in similar areas within these other countries, UK, France, Germany, etc.  The borders within Europe are open.

...loosely connected networks, broad-based youth environment.
...criminal settlements which manifest itself in serious violence in public places, various forms of extortion
and unlawful influence.
...Witnesses don't come forward. Difficulty to get people to testify.  Police vehicles attacked.
 ...establishes an informal power structure ultimately benefits the criminal actors.
...the public's fear of reprisal led to the ordinary justice system to some extent being sidelined

55 specific areas in 22 cities with these characteristics are identified on detailed maps. 

No mention of a religion in the demographics, or of "no-go zones".  It is only on the opinion pages that observers call these areas no-go zones for police or non-Muslims.  The official police report refers to the situation as "serious" and "worrisome".

https://polisen.se/Global/www%20och%20Intrapolis/Rapporter-utredningar/01%20Polisen%20nationellt/Ovriga%20rapporter-utredningar/Kriminella%20natverk%20med%20stor%20paverkan%20i%20lokalsamhallet%20Sekretesspr%2014.pdf
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« Reply #465 on: January 26, 2015, 12:19:05 PM »



PARIS — The typical trajectory of most French Islamist terrorists follows four steps: alienation from the dominant culture, thanks partly to joblessness and discrimination in blighted neighborhoods; a turn to petty crime, which leads to prison, and then more crime and more prison; religious awakening and radicalization; and an initiatory journey to a Muslim country like Syria, Afghanistan or Yemen to train for jihad.

Stints in prison were seminal for Chérif Kouachi, Amedy Coulibaly and other major figures of French jihadism in recent years — Mohammed Merah, Mehdi Nemmouche, Khaled Kelkal — as both a rite of passage and a gateway to radicalism.

Muslims account for about 7-10 percent of France’s total population but around half of its prison population of 68,000. Muslims are even more numerous in facilities near large cities, particularly in maisons d’arrêt, which hold prisoners serving shorter sentences.

Precise figures are unavailable because laïcité, France’s strict form of secularism, prohibits officially asking and collecting data about people’s religious preferences. These estimates are based on research I conducted in French prisons in 2000-3 and again in 2011-3, when I interviewed some 160 inmates and many guards, doctors and social workers in four major facilities, some among the largest in Europe. Fifteen of those inmates had been sentenced for terrorist acts.

Many Muslims feel marginalized when they get to prison, due to exclusion and bigotry from the white majority in mainstream society, and their own counterracism. Although in urban prisons they are a majority, they continue to feel victimized and trapped. Very few guards are Muslim, and prison officials, who tend to be hypersecular, have little understanding of Islam, for example confusing fundamentalism with extremism.

“Look at how a Catholic or a Jew is treated, and look at how we are treated,” Abdelkarim, a Frenchman of Italian origin in his late 20s who was serving a five-year sentence for armed robbery, told me in 2012. “They have their weekly prayers; in this prison we don’t have Friday prayers. Their rabbi can go to all the cells; our Muslim minister cannot. There’s kosher food, but no halal meat. They despise us, and they call that laïcité.”

In fact, Muslim ministers can visit Muslim inmates in their cells but usually don’t do it for lack of time, and halal meat is increasingly available. But such misperceptions are common, and they only reinforce the appeal of Islam as the religion of choice for the stigmatized and the oppressed. Unlike Christianity, it has an anti-Western and anti-imperialist bend.

One young French inmate of Algerian origin told me in 2013, “If you are a Muslim and ask to participate in the Friday prayers, they take your name down and hand it over to the Renseignements Généraux.” (The Renseignements Généraux is the French equivalent of the FBI.) He added: “If I try to take my prayer carpet to the courtyard, they prohibit it. If I grow a beard, the guards call me Bin Laden, smiling and mocking me. They hate Islam. But Islam can take revenge!”
Continue reading the main story Continue reading the main story
Continue reading the main story

Adherence to radical Islam is largely the transfer into the spiritual realm of that particular combination of indignation, rancor and wholesale rejection encompassed by the expression, widespread among prisoners, “avoir la haine” (to have hate). For some inmates, especially those who were only nominally Muslim and nonpracticing, violent aspirations emerge first, with religiosity — and often a very approximate understanding of Islam — grafting itself onto to them later.

Abdelkarim, who converted to Islam (and adopted an Arabic name) about a decade before I met him, acted as an informal Salafist chaplain; his prison counted about 1,000 Muslim inmates and just one Muslim minister, an older gentleman from North Africa out of touch with the young prisoners’ concerns. Each time Abdelkarim sang the call to prayer at dawn he would be sent to solitary confinement for a few days; eventually he was transferred to another jail. Nationwide, there is only about one Muslim minister for every 190 inmates, leaving self-proclaimed ulama to proffer their own religious guidance.

Radical preaching catches on because it offers young Muslim prisoners a way to escape their predicament and develop a fantasy of omnipotence by declaring death onto their oppressors. During my research in 2000-3, the prisoners idolized Khaled Kelkal, whose network killed eight people in a Paris subway station in 1995 to punish the French government for backing a military coup against an Islamist party in Algeria. A decade later their new icon was Mohammed Merah, who in 2012 shot down seven people, including soldiers and Jewish children, in the name of radical Islam; some inmates even impersonated him. Now the new celebrities will be the Kouachi brothers and Coulibaly.

About three months ago, the authorities at Fresnes, a very large prison known for its strict discipline, started experimenting with separating suspected Muslim radicals from the general population, grouping them in special cells. Although it is too early to assess the measure’s effectiveness, the provisional results are mixed.

The prisoners’ segregation at Fresnes is incomplete, owing to the shape of the 19th-century building. With rows of cell blocks branching out perpendicularly from a central corridor, the inmates can communicate with each other simply by shouting. The radicalized prisoners now have less influence on other inmates, especially ones who are impressionable or have mental disorders. But they are in closer contact with one another, allowing them to organize and make plans.

Prime Minister Manuel Valls announced recently that the quarantine program would be expanded in several prisons around Paris. The proposal needs to be refined. Seasoned jihadists must be separated from untested radicals and the returnees from, say, Syria and Iraq, who may have been traumatized or disappointed by their experience of jihad and still stand a chance of being reintegrated into mainstream society.

More must also be done to address the legitimate claims of Muslim inmates. Collective Friday prayers should be allowed in all French prisons, for example. The government announced last week that 60 Muslim ministers would be trained to supplement the 182 or so currently in service. This is a welcome proposal. But at least three times as many ministers are needed, and they must be more uniformly distributed throughout the prisons. Above all, they will need to be coached to better understand and address the concerns of disaffected young Muslim prisoners.

Indeed, reform must begin with respect. For if French prisons have become a breeding ground for radicalism, it is partly because they mistreat the Islamic faith itself.

Farhad Khosrokhavar is a sociologist at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales and the author, most recently, of “Radicalisation.”
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #466 on: January 27, 2015, 11:27:41 PM »



http://www.spectator.co.uk/features/9420662/how-marine-le-pen-is-winning-frances-gay-vote/
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objectivist1
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« Reply #467 on: January 28, 2015, 06:54:03 AM »

Fascinating article, Crafty.  Maybe French gays are starting to finally wake up and "smell the coffee."  One can only hope it happens here in the US as well, but I think until we start getting such murders here on a regular basis, sadly - things won't change.
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« Reply #468 on: January 28, 2015, 09:15:40 AM »

Back in the 60s, there was this saying "A conservative is a liberal who has been mugged."

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objectivist1
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« Reply #469 on: January 28, 2015, 09:22:52 AM »

Yes - also William F. Buckley stated that (paraphrasing) Conservatism is an inherently intellectual exercise.  It requires discernment.  Liberalism is the default position - the most gutless choice one can make - because it's easy to profess to have compassion without regard to actual results.
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« Reply #470 on: February 03, 2015, 04:58:40 AM »

http://www.breitbart.com/national-security/2015/01/30/mark-steyn-on-europes-no-go-zones/

The left loves to deny real problems while creating imaginary ones.
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« Reply #471 on: February 03, 2015, 06:55:21 AM »

http://www.breitbart.com/national-security/2015/01/30/mark-steyn-on-europes-no-go-zones/

The left loves to deny real problems while creating imaginary ones.

Thank you GM and Mark Steyn (famous people caught reading the forum):

But we’re supposed to believe they’re not real, because they don’t have big “KEEP OUT OR DIE, INFIDEL!” billboards denoting their perimeter, and they’re not labeled “Muslim No-Go Zone #23″ on the official maps of major European cities...

Yet.  They don't mark the perimeter because they are actively expanding it.
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« Reply #472 on: February 10, 2015, 04:32:11 PM »

http://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2015/02/french-artists-calls-for-peace-end-in-brutal-beating-by-local-muslims/
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« Reply #473 on: February 11, 2015, 08:06:44 AM »

The Sound of Silence

by Mark Steyn

February 9, 2015

Professor Jonathan Turley of George Washington University is nobody's idea of a right-winger. He voted for Obama, and supports almost all of his policy goals (if not his extra-constitutional methods). But, unlike most of the left, he's still prepared to defend free speech against what he calls Charlie's False Friends:

For civil libertarians, it is clear that when leaders insist that they "Stand with Charlie" it does not mean actually standing with free speech. To the contrary, the greatest threat facing free speech today is found in Western governments, which have increasingly criminalized and prosecuted speech, particularly anti-religious speech. Once the defining right of Western Civilization, free speech is dying in the West and few world leaders truly mourn its passing.

Around the world, speech is under attack under an array of hate speech and anti-discrimination laws... The result is a growing, if not insatiable, appetite for speech regulation that only increases after violent responses to controversial publications.

The most recent tragedy in France follows an all too familiar pattern from publication to prosecution. Consider what happened in 2005 with the publication of the Danish cartoons and the global riots leading to the murder of non-Muslims and burning of churches and homes. The West rallied around the right of free speech, but then quietly ramped up prosecutions of speech. It happened again in 2012 when a low-budget trailer of a low-grade movie was put on YouTube. The "Innocence of Muslims" trailer was deemed insulting to Mohammad and Islam and led to another global spasm of murder and arson by irate Muslims. Again, Western leaders professed support for free speech while cracking down further on anti-religious speech. Even in the United States, President Obama insisted that the filmmaker Nakoula Basseley Nakoula had every right to make the film. However, the next image that the world saw after that speech was filmmaker being thrown into a police car in handcuffs for technical violations of a probation on unrelated charges...

Professor Turley then lists a round-up of state assaults on freedom of expression from around the so-called free world, including my own difficulties in Canada. I doubt Turley agrees with a single one of these hatespeechers (including me) on the merits, but he recognizes that the point of free speech is for the speech you hate. If you don't believe in free speech for those you hate, you don't believe in free speech at all. And then he adds:

These cases represent more than a lack of support for free speech. They represent a comprehensive assault on free speech. Indeed, one of the world leaders proudly proclaiming support for free speech in Paris has banned the publication of the Charlie Hebdo cartoons. Turkish Deputy Prime Minister Yalcin Akdogan called the use of the prophet's image on the magazine an act of "sedition and provocation."

Well, Turkey is hardly anyone's idea of a crucible of liberty. But what are we to make of England, mother of the free? The other day Wiltshire Police went to a local newsagent and demanded that, in the interests of "community cohesion", he hand over the names of every customer who bought a copy of Charlie Hebdo:

Mrs Keat, a self-confessed news junkie, ordered the magazine from a local newsagent in Corsham, Wiltshire, a week after the 7 January attacks in Paris. Two days after she bought her magazine, she learned that an officer had been back to ask for the names of the buyers.

The names and addresses of the buyers were added to an intelligence note and fed into a police crime and intelligence system, police confirmed. The force deleted the note after details of the visit came to light in a letter that Mrs Keat wrote to The Guardian and warned of the potential ramifications after seeing an advert for Je Suis Charlie badges...

What really is the difference between Charlie Hebdo's killers and Wiltshire Police? The anti-Charlie crowd made it clear years ago that they knew where the offending cartoonists were and one day they would get them. The Wiltshire Police are not so subtly telling Charlie's English readers that they know where you are - just in case one day they need to get you:

"Wiltshire Police would like to apologise to the members of public who may be affected by this. Information relating to this specific incident has been permanently and securely disposed of," it said... "Wiltshire Police are confident that the police officer's intention was purely around enhancing public safety and ensuring that the newsagent was advised appropriately."

You can get away with anything when you smother it in blather about "enhancing" public safety and "advising appropriately". But the fact remains that, a few days after the hideous opportunist Cameron was marching under the #JeSuisCharlie banner in Paris, his coppers were ordering newsagents to cough up the names of anyone who bought the magazine. This is Mother England in 2015: You can still read samizdat literature, but your name will be entered in a state database.

Equally disturbing was a recent English court judgment re the Home Office ban denying Robert Spencer and Pamela Geller entry into the United Kingdom. Their Lordships' appalling decision essentially extends the heckler's veto to Her Britannic Majesty's immigration policy:

A British Court of Appeal handed down its judgment dismissing our appeal challenging our ban from entering the United Kingdom. The key element of its decision is its emphasis on the fact that "this was a public order case where the police had advised that significant public disorder and serious violence might ensue from the proposed visit." In writing that judgment, Lord Justice Tomlinson (with whom Lord Justice Patten and Lord Justice Floyd agree) has only made it clear that the British government has decided to set aside established law and the freedom of speech in order to appease violent Muslims.

No serious person thinks Spencer and Geller are any threat to "public order". They speak without incident all over not only the United States but also the Dominion of Canada, and without unduly stressing the Queen's Peace. So, if they can't speak without incident in the United Kingdom, that is a reflection not on them but on Britain. What Lord Justice Tomlinson means by the prospect of "serious violence" is that, if you're booked to give a speech in Oxford and some Islamic grievance-mongers threaten to go bananas over it, your speech has to be forbidden in deference to the crazies. The decision thus incentivizes those who threaten violence. As Laura Rosen Cohen likes to say, "security concerns" are the new "shut up".


And, if you think David Cameron's ministry has grown far too comfortable with using state power to restrain the opinions of a free party, wait till the other fellows take over:

The shadow home secretary, Yvette Cooper, will on Monday unveil a strategy to tackle the UK's soaring rise in antisemitism, Islamophobia, homophobia and abuse of people with disabilities. The package includes making homophobic and disability hate crimes an aggravated criminal offence, ensuring that police treat such offences in the same way as racist hate crimes.

Cooper will outline changes to the criminal records framework whereby such offences will be clearly marked on the criminal records of perpetrators. Currently, records checks do not highlight homophobia, disability or transgender identity as a motivating factor in a conviction, and do not automatically appear in police data used for vetting applicants in sensitive vocations, such as those working with vulnerable people, including the disabled.

Labour's move comes as a new breakdown of police figures reveals an escalation in hate crimes since 2012, with a steep rise in abuse reported by the transgender community alongside the well-documented rises in antisemitism and Islamophobia.

As that grab-bag suggests, right now the leftie sexual identity groups are happy to make common cause with the Islamocrazies because they're both about shutting people up. For example, the feminist comedienne Kate Smurthwaite is already in Britain so, unlike Robert Spencer and Pamela Geller, she can't be turned back at Heathrow. But she apparently holds insufficiently "respectful" attitudes to "sex workers", so she had her speech at Goldsmiths College canceled because of - what else? - "security concerns". The topic of her talk was, of course, free speech.

Professor Jonathan Turley says:

Western leaders have increasingly spoken out against the dangers of free speech. For politicians, free speech is an abstraction, the consequences of free speech tend to be more tangible in the form of riots and murders.

You don't have to be a politician to think "free speech is an abstraction". Robert Spencer might want to give speeches about Islam, and Mrs Keat might want to read Charlie Hebdo, but most people don't want to give any speeches at all and are content to read Hello! or People or whatever's filling the rack where Charlie Hebdo used to be. In some ways, it's the easiest right to surrender, particularly to regimes that smother the expansion of state regulatory power in soothing twaddle about "enhancing public safety" to protect "vulnerable people".

Speaking of "vulnerable people", how about this headline from The Daily Mirror?

Child sex abuse gangs could have assaulted ONE MILLION youngsters in the UK

That's according to Rotherham Labour MP Sarah Champion. Who knows if it's true? On the one hand, Britain is so alert to "paedos" that, if some cheesy old Radio One disc-jockey is alleged to have grabbed the passing breast of a 15-year-old teenybopper on "Top Of The Pops" in 1973, he'll be dragged through the courts and publicly ruined. But vast, systemic, industrial-scale 21st-century paedophilia by Muslim grooming gangs aided and abetted by law enforcement and local government will be ignored and hushed up - essentially in the interests of (what was that expression again?) "community cohesion". It turns out free speech isn't that "abstract". When you so hedge in free expression with political correctness, you make it impossible even to raise certain subjects, and thereby facilitate real, non-abstract evil. The loss of free speech brings other losses, too.

Yet, looking at the ease with which governments of some of the oldest, freest societies on earth are shackling and restraining the right to speak, to read, to think, the obvious question to ask is what rights will they go after next? After all, if 300 years of free speech can be rolled back in the interest of "enhancing public safety", why not property rights, due process, freedom of association, freedom of religion or even (gasp!) sexual liberty? Why think that statist restraints on core liberties will confine themselves to just one right?
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Crafty_Dog
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« Reply #474 on: February 12, 2015, 11:13:43 AM »



https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=722669444544986
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« Reply #475 on: February 18, 2015, 07:30:07 PM »

There Is No Modern Islam

Posted By Daniel Greenfield On February 18, 2015 @ frontpagemag.com

Like math and the Midwest, ISIS confuses progressives. It’s not hard to confuse a group of people who never figured out that if you borrow 18 trillion dollars, you’re going to have to pay it back. But ISIS is especially confusing to a demographic whose entire ideology is being on the right side of history.

Raised to believe that history inevitably trended toward diversity in catalog models, fusion restaurants and gay marriage, the Arab Spring led them on by promising that the Middle East would be just like Europe and then ISIS tore up their Lonely Planet guidebook to Syria and chopped off their heads.

But ISIS also believes that it’s on the right side of history. Its history is the Koran. The right side of its history is what Iraq and Syria look like today. It’s also how parts of Europe are starting to look.

Progressive politicians and pundits trying to cope with ISIS lapse into a shrill incoherence that has nothing to do with their outrage at its atrocities and a lot to do with their sheer incomprehension. Terms like “apocalyptic nihilism” get thrown around as if heavy metal were beginning to make a comeback.

Those few analysts who admit that the Islamic State might be a just a little Islamic emphasize that it’s a medieval throwback, as if there were some modern version of Islam to compare it to.

Journalists trying to make sense of ISIS demanding Jizya payments and taking slaves ought to remember that these aren’t medieval behaviors in the Middle East. Not unless medieval means the 19th century. And that’s spotting them a whole century. Saudi Arabia only abolished slavery in 1962 under pressure from the United States. Its labor market and that of fellow Petrojihadi kingdoms like Kuwait and Qatar are based on arrangements that look a lot like temporary slavery… for those foreigners who survive.

Non-Muslims paid Jizya to Muslim rulers until very recently. Here is what it looked like in nineteenth century Morocco from the account of James Riley, an American shipwrecked sea captain.

“The Mohammedan scrivener appointed to receive it took it from them, hitting each one a smart blow with his fist on his bare forehead, by way of receipt for his money, at which the Jews said, ‘Thank you, my lord.’”

Those Jews who could not pay were flogged and imprisoned until they converted to Islam. An account from 1894 is similar, except that the blows were delivered to the back of the neck. Only French colonialism finally put a stop to this practice as well as many other brutal Islamic Supremacist laws.

Morocco was one of the Arab countries where Jews were treated reasonably well by the standards of the Muslim world. It’s one of the few Arab countries to still retain a Jewish population. When ISIS demands Jizya from non-Muslims, it’s not reviving some controversial medieval behavior. It’s doing what even “moderate” Muslim countries were doing until European guns and warships made them stop.

If the French hadn’t intervened, the same ugly scene would have gone on playing out in Morocco. If the United States hadn’t intervened, the Saudis would still openly keep slaves.

Islam never became enlightened. It never stopped being ‘medieval’. Whatever enlightenment it received was imposed on it by European colonialism. It’s a second-hand enlightenment that never went under the skin.

ISIS isn’t just seventh century Islam. It’s also much more recent than that. It’s Islam before the French and the English came. It’s what the Muslim world was like before it was forced to have presidents and constitutions, before it was forced to at least pay lip service to the alien notion of equal rights for all.

The media reported the burning of the Jordanian pilot as if it were some horrifying and unprecedented aberration. But Muslim heretics, as well as Jews and Christians accused of blasphemy, were burned alive for their crimes against Islam. Numerous accounts of this remain, not from the seventh century, but from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Those who weren’t burned, might be beheaded.

These were not the practices of some apocalyptic death cult. They were the Islamic law in the “cosmopolitan” parts of North Africa. The only reason they aren’t the law now is that the French left behind some of their own laws.

Muslim countries like Saudi Arabia that were never truly colonized still behead men and women for “witchcraft and sorcery.” Not in the seventh century or even in the nineteenth century. Last year.

The problem isn’t that ISIS is ‘medieval’. The problem is that Islam is.

What progressives mistake for modern Islam, whether while touring Algeria or on the campus of their university, is really an Islam whose practice has been repressed by the West while its ideology remains untouched. Modern Islam is in a state of contradiction. It’s a schizophrenic religion whose doctrine calls for supremacism but whose capabilities prevent it from exercising the full measure of its doctrines.

Islam is the 90 lb. weakling that wants to be the school bully. It can’t punch you in the face, so it stabs you in the back and then blames someone else. When you punch it back, it plays the victim.

This split between ideas and power forced Islamists to resort to sneakier tactics, from terrorism to mass migration, to fulfill the spirit of their religion. The underlying imperative is to restore a conquering Islam capable of humiliating non-Muslims in Muslim lands and expanding into non-Muslim countries. That is why Saddam and Iran pursued weapons of mass destruction. Why Muslim armies tested themselves against Israel. Why Al Qaeda built a decentralized terrorist network with cells around the world.

Together with the practical agendas of wealth and power was a deeper spiritual significance. Islam required that its leaders wage a war against the infidels. And they had to do so on terms that would allow them to win. Or at least to survive the attempt.

ISIS cuts through the split by advocating an uncompromising supremacism. Its theater of brutality is meant to convince Muslim audiences that they have the ability to directly confront the West. They no longer need to navigate a course between their capabilities and their religion. Under a Caliph, they can build the capabilities to restore the full practice of Islam as it was before the Europeans put a stop to it.

In the bigger picture, ISIS would like to turn the clock back to the seventh century. That’s a vision it shares with any number of Islamist groups and governments. But its most objectionable behavior, such as beheading and burning non-Muslims, taking slaves and demanding Jizya from non-Muslims, only requires turning back the clock to the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

To truly understand ISIS, we don’t need to go back to the seventh century. The eighteenth century would be just as good. And once we understand that, we understand all the rest of it too.

Progressives see ISIS as a historical aberration. ISIS sees them the same way. It’s all a question of whose history book we’re using and which side is willing to do anything to win. Islam is a religion of war. Its right side of history is not a matter of faith. The right side of history is the side that wins.
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« Reply #476 on: February 20, 2015, 05:01:06 PM »

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/20/world/europe/after-attacks-denmark-hesitates-to-blame-islam.html?emc=edit_th_20150220&nl=todaysheadlines&nlid=49641193
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« Reply #477 on: February 21, 2015, 09:57:52 AM »

http://pamelageller.com/2015/02/over-500-muslims-attend-islamic-burial-for-danish-cafesynagogue-murderer.html/
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« Reply #478 on: February 23, 2015, 01:47:29 PM »

Not 100% confident of the reporting by The Blaze here, but interesting nonetheless:

http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2015/02/23/was-the-muslim-ring-of-peace-around-the-norway-synagogue-really-an-msm-hoax/
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« Reply #479 on: February 28, 2015, 09:57:57 AM »

A Mom’s Choice: Jihad or Jail
U.K. woman who told police her son joined a militant group in Syria now regrets her decision
By Alexis Flynn and Jenny Gross
Updated Feb. 27, 2015 6:02 p.m. ET
WSJ

BIRMINGHAM, England—Majida Sarwar searched the bedroom of her 21-year-old son five days after he left on what he had said was a university-sponsored trip. Mrs. Sarwar found a frightening six-page letter, addressed, “DEAR MUM PLEASE READ,” that sent her to police.

“As you know, I have gone for a holiday, but the real purpose is to do Jihad for Allah,” the May 2013 letter began. It ended saying he was headed to Syria, where, citing religion, “I will help the oppressed and fight Allah’s enemies.”

Mrs. Sarwar and her husband worked with U.K. authorities to help retrieve their son and his boyhood friend from an al Qaeda-linked rebel group fighting to topple Syrian President Bashar al-Assad.

Months later, the young men, apparently disillusioned with the war, agreed to return home. They were arrested on arrival at London’s Heathrow Airport and sentenced in December to more than 12 years in prison, the longest penalty imposed in the U.K. so far for traveling to fight in Syria. Mrs. Sarwar, angry over the sentence, says she regrets turning in her son.

As Western countries try to figure out how to keep young people from the lure of Islamic Stateand other terror groups, the U.K. has turned to Muslim women in a program launched last year to help spot radicalism sprouting in their families. The idea is to intercept family members before they leave. Other intervention programs have been started in Denmark, France and Australia.

But the experience of the Sarwar family illustrates the difficulties, and it may give pause to parents who face the choice for their sons and daughters of a militant’s death abroad or a lengthy prison term at home.


“The feeling in the Muslim community was, ‘Are you kidding me?’ ” said Farooq Siddique, a former adviser to the British government’s anti-extremism campaign. “You are effectively asking parents to spy on their children.”

Authorities in the U.K. and throughout Europe are focused on keeping citizens from the conflict zones in Syria and Iraq, seeking to counter homegrown extremism that this year has yielded deadly shooting sprees in Paris and Copenhagen. But despite tightened borders and tougher laws, the numbers are rising.

This week, the British government has come under fire for failing to prevent three Muslim girls from flying to Turkey, despite knowing their links with a British woman suspected of joining Islamic State, also known as ISIS or ISIL. Authorities say the school friends, ages 15 and 16, are now believed to be in Syria.

U.S. authorities arrested three men this week from Brooklyn, N.Y., suspected of planning to travel to Syria to join the militant group. A lawyer for one of the men, Akhror Saidakhmetov, said his client planned to plead not guilty. Lawyers for the other two men declined to comment.

Europol, Europe’s police coordinating agency, said as many as 6,000 Europeans have gone to Syria and Iraq. The U.K. counts about 600 of its citizens who have traveled there, mostly to fight; the U.S. about 100.

The head of the U.K.’s domestic intelligence agency known as MI5 said in January that authorities had detected more than 20 terror plots by militants in Syria, including ones directed at Canada, Australia, Belgium and France.

British Prime Minister David Cameron said this week the fact that young British girls can be persuaded by reading the Internet in their rooms to join extremist groups “demonstrates the scale of the problem.”  Beyond police and border agents, Mr. Cameron said, “Everyone has a role to play in preventing our young people being radicalized—whether schools, colleges and universities or families, religious leaders and local communities.”

In addition to the campaign aimed mostly at Muslim mothers, U.K. authorities are seeking passage of a law this year that would require schools, colleges and other public institutions to take action against radicals.

But imposing a statutory duty would create “a climate of fear, where people don’t feel comfortable having a frank conversation,” said Talha Ahmad, of the Muslim Council of Britain, an umbrella group for Muslim organizations. He said the government should be focusing on building ties with local Muslims rather than increased scrutiny, which can fuel mistrust.

Others say the approach places an unfair burden on Muslim families to turn in their own children or siblings, citing the case of Mrs. Sarwar and her son.
Studying computers

Yusuf Sarwar grew up in Handsworth, an ethnically mixed working-class neighborhood in Birmingham. He attended classes at Birmingham City University, studying computer science and working part time guarding cars at a soccer club. He met Mohammed Nahin Ahmed, a postal worker, in junior high.

They took religious inspiration reading online material from Osama bin Laden ’s mentor, Abdullah Yusuf Azzam, as well as from online chats with extremists abroad, according to U.K. prosecutors.

Mr. Ahmed, age 22, asked in one exchange with a Danish Islamist in March 2012: “would the brothers in yemen accept me?” The Dane said he could “be a mujahid wherever in the world you are. Look at 7/7 from your country,” referring to the 2005 attack on London’s transport system that killed 56 people, including the four attackers.

By December 2012, Mr. Sarwar and Mr. Ahmed had begun plans to join the fight in Syria, according to court filings. Mr. Sarwar bought supplies on Amazon, including balaclavas, combat gloves and a walkie-talkie, which prosecutors said were intended for battle. He also bought gym equipment, including a punching bag, prosecutors said.

Two months later, in February 2013, Mr. Sarwar told his mother he was going on a two-week university trip to Turkey. He forged a flier about the outing and included an email contact, which carried a pseudonym for a Hot Mail account he created, according to court documents.

In May 2013, the two men flew to Istanbul on one-way tickets, authorities said, and then made their way to Syria.

During a neighborhood visit a few days later, Mr. Ahmed’s father asked Mrs. Sarwar about the trip their two boys had taken together, according to prosecutors. That was news to Mrs. Sarwar. Her son had said he was traveling alone. That sent her searching his room, where she found the letter explaining his deception and asking forgiveness, prosecutors said.

Mr. Sarwar’s letter also included instructions for settling his affairs, including how to cancel a mobile phone contract and pay any outstanding debts. He told his mother where she could find a check equal to $7,466, his savings, to underwrite a pilgrimage to Mecca for her.

When Mrs. Sarwar handed over the letter to police, she told them she had no inkling of his radical views.

Police assigned an officer to Mrs. Sarwar and her husband as a liaison with detectives. Authorities searched the homes of the Sarwars and the Ahmeds, who lived nearby.

In Syria, Messrs. Sarwar and Ahmed received training from Jabhat al Nusra, an affiliate of al Qaeda, according to prosecutors, and were sent near Aleppo, a scene of fierce battle.

Police and prosecutors pieced together the men’s movements by reading their conversations over the WhatsApp mobile messaging service. Mr. Ahmed exchanged lighthearted and sometimes flirtatious chats with a British woman, who authorities said was a sympathizer. Mr. Ahmed sent her a picture of himself surrounded by automatic rifles.

Mrs. Sarwar tried to stay in touch with her son by phone, according to Ayaz Iqbal, a lawyer for the family. Her eldest son also tried to talk his brother into coming home, Mr. Iqbal said.

Yusuf Sarwar wasn’t persuaded. But after months in Syria, he and Mr. Ahmed had a change of heart. When they decided to return, Mrs. Sarwar gave police the flight details.

Armed police provided an airport homecoming. Forensic experts swabbed the men’s belongings and found traces of military-grade explosives.

Mr. Ahmed and Mr. Sarwar each pleaded guilty at the start of their criminal trial to a single count of engaging in conduct in preparation of terrorist acts. The material provided in their defense was intended to mitigate the penalty.

Attorneys for Mr. Ahmed and Mr. Sarwar argued that the men—acting on their conscience—had been helping to overthrow the Assad regime, a stated British policy in 2013. The men claim not to have fought but instead worked as guards and grave diggers.

Prosecutors acknowledged they couldn’t prove the men had fought on behalf of a terror group but presented as evidence the traces of explosives found when they arrived. Defense lawyers said the material likely came from administering first-aid to civilian bomb victims.

The men offered statements in court down-playing their commitment to radical Islam. Each said they had never intended to attack fellow citizens or commit terrorism in the U.K.

“The defendant is British and he is proud to be British,” said Michael Ivers, Mr. Sarwar’s lawyer. “He is not somebody who is alienated. He enjoys the tolerant society he lives in.”

During the December sentencing hearing, Mr. Ivers urged the judge to take into account Mrs. Sarwar’s cooperation with authorities and said a stiff sentence could deter other families.

Mr. Sarwar and Mr. Ahmed showed little emotion when the judge gave their sentence. “It’s with no enthusiasm the court sentences young men to significant terms of imprisonment,” but they had enthusiastically and determinedly embarked on a path intending to commit terrorist acts, the judge said.


Police in several U.K. cities, including London, have been meeting for months with small groups of Muslim women to warn of seemingly innocuous online forums, including gaming zones. They urge mothers to ask their children about their Internet use. The women also are coached to take notice if family members turn more outwardly religious or are increasingly angry about Syria’s civil war.


Authorities say the program works. Dozens of families contacted police in the first six months of “Prevent Tragedies,” London’s Metropolitan Police said. That helped lead to an increase across the U.K. in terror-related arrests to 327 in 2014 from fewer than 250 the previous year. Of last year’s arrests, 165 were Syria-related, nearly seven times the number in 2013.

The U.K. isn’t alone in such grass-roots efforts. Denmark, which has large numbers of foreign fighters relative to its population, has a program offering help for returning foreign fighters to find a job and a place to live. The program also offers counseling to steer people from extremist ideology.

In France, the government has set up a hotline for tips from friends and family of the more than 1,000 people that authorities say are either planning to travel to fight abroad or have already gone.

Australia, which had a deadly standoff in a Sydney cafe in December, created a $10.5 million program that includes grants to ethnic communities, mainly in the suburbs of Sydney, Brisbane and Melbourne, to help counter extremism.

Detective Chief Superintendent Sue Southern, head of the West Midlands police counterterror unit that handled the Sarwar case, acknowledged the fragility of community trust. She said she was sympathetic to Mrs. Sarwar’s feelings but there was little police could do. By the time the family alerted police, she said, Yusuf Sarwar had already committed a crime.

“When a mother contacts us to say, ‘My son’s missing, I think he’s in Syria, can you get him back,’ it’s too late,” she said.

Mrs. Sarwar worked with authorities, in part, because she believed her son would receive more lenient treatment in return, according to a lawyer who represented the family.

One of Mr. Ahmed’s brothers said the stiff sentence was “going to backfire” by alienating Muslim families and discouraging them from coming forward. The brother said Mr. Ahmed recognized his mistakes, and it would have been better for authorities to work to integrate him back into society.

Mr. Sarwar and Mr. Ahmed had grown disillusioned during their months in Syria, according to their accounts in court. They became disturbed by the rise of Islamic State, particularly the militant group’s pursuit of sectarian killing. And they found Syria’s revolution had turned into a deadly rivalry pitting one rebel group against another.

The Sarwars and Ahmeds have also split. Mr. Ahmed’s brother said his family regrets that Mrs. Sarwar called police, and the families no longer speak.

Write to Alexis Flynn at alexis.flynn@wsj.com and Jenny Gross at jenny.gross@wsj.com
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« Reply #480 on: March 01, 2015, 07:03:38 AM »

I'm confused. I have been told jihad doesn't mean violence.  shocked
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« Reply #481 on: March 03, 2015, 12:05:16 AM »

http://www.barenakedislam.com/2015/03/01/norway-mullah-tells-tv-interviewer-we-have-the-right-to-kill-anyone-who-does-not-respect-muslims/

http://toprightnews.com/?p=8509
« Last Edit: March 03, 2015, 12:14:39 AM by Crafty_Dog » Logged
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« Reply #482 on: March 14, 2015, 08:10:08 PM »


http://speisa.com/modules/articles/index.php/item.397/this-country-will-be-the-first-islamic-nation-in-europe-muslims-claim.html

Daily headlines prove that Europe is bursting at the seams with Islamists attempting to establish Sharia law and homegrown terror plots. France is ablaze with radicals, ISIS threatens they will send Spain back to the times of the Ottoman Empire, and Britain is much too concerned with appeasing Muslims that they are doing away with their own citizens’ free speech.

The world is idly watching to see which European country will fall to Islamic rule, creating the first Muslim nation.

According to TMI, Muslims have already established which country will be the first to cave to Sharia:

A website claiming to be the Danish Muslim Party (DAMP) published a “press release” in English and Danish, saying that Denmark will be the first Muslim nation in Europe.

The website also stated as follows:

“[W]e can assure you that everything will be better in Muslim Denmark: No drugs, no crime, peace, and humanity – instead of drug culture, immorality, possibly human rights crimes and violence which we have now.”

“Every immigrant or Muslim in Danish jails should be released from prisons, because it is possible that there has been plotting or framing or provocation towards them – and all cases should be investigated again carefully.”

“Muslim party will be biggest party of Denmark – and it may be soon. First day after Turkey becomes EU member country – about one million 20-50 year old Muslims [may] move to Denmark, and after that Denmark [may] be a Muslim country. Be ready!”

“Danish Muslim party’s only agenda is to get Muslims into Danish politics and into the parliament, no matter what our ideas and religious or political beliefs are.”

Mathaba News Network cites that 700,000 Muslims live in Denmark, and about one-third of the Danish parliament is Muslim. With this large of a percentage of Islamists in government, Muslims are seeing their religious views established in legislature under the guise of anti-discrimination.

According to the website, riots and violence from the Muslim community is a direct response to the mistreatment of Muslims, and can be solved by integrating them into politics.

So, to keep Islamists from killing and rioting, we must put them in positions of power, and if we don’t, they will resort to destruction and violence. Does this sound like the kind of people who you would trust to lead a nation?

Denmark had better wake up to the religious revolution before their rights are stripped away from them in favor of an Islamic State.






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« Reply #483 on: July 22, 2015, 06:52:55 PM »

http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/woman/real_life/6554233/Ex-paid-thugs-to-throw-acid-at-me.html

Islamaphobia.
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