Author Topic: Immigration issues  (Read 457381 times)


ccp

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immigration is good for us
« Reply #1601 on: November 11, 2019, 05:48:48 AM »
https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2019/11/10/ny-times-tidal-wave-mass-immigration-hands-virginia-democrats/

What is it that attracts all these foreigners to the Dems and what do we do about it?

besides telling them about "jobs"

obvious that don't work

DougMacG

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Re: immigration is good for us
« Reply #1602 on: November 11, 2019, 07:52:53 AM »
ccp:
https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2019/11/10/ny-times-tidal-wave-mass-immigration-hands-virginia-democrats/

What is it that attracts all these foreigners to the Dems and what do we do about it?
-------------------------

Dismantle the welfare state and immigrants will come for freedom and free enterprise.

Dismantle the government state and much of Virginia would have to scramble for work.

Interestingly, in the Trump economy black males are the new conservative constituency.  Blacks and Hispanics have more to lose with the waves of illegal immigrants than do whites in safe suburban areas,

ccp

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Re: Immigration issues
« Reply #1603 on: November 11, 2019, 08:07:55 AM »
"Dismantle the welfare state and immigrants will come for freedom and free enterprise.

Dismantle the government state and much of Virginia would have to scramble for work."

Agreed

but how do we do that
with 1/5 of people in US foreign born with most are crats

The Dems are blocking everything
and the foreigners are flooding the US everyday. 

Even Trump has not been able to stop it.





DougMacG

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Re: Immigration issues (Crafty's American Creed definition too)
« Reply #1604 on: November 11, 2019, 08:38:05 AM »
"Dismantle the welfare state and immigrants will come for freedom and free enterprise.

Dismantle the government state and much of Virginia would have to scramble for work."

Agreed

but how do we do that
with 1/5 of people in US foreign born with most are crats

The Dems are blocking everything
and the foreigners are flooding the US everyday. 

Even Trump has not been able to stop it.

Must WIN an election.  Uphill battle, maybe not winnable.

Last time we had majorities that included McCain, Flake, Corker, etc. and majority alone is  not "control" of the Senate. 

Trump mentioned reforming 'entitlements' in his second  term.  I don't know if he will.  I don't know if he can.  We all know it won't happen if the other side wins. 

They lose by over-stepping.  We are losing the messaging war.  Trump has one election opportunity to make a dent in that. 

Someone needs to tell young people, what your radical teachers and profs told you in school is wrong.

TRY OFFERING THIS:

[Quote from: Crafty_Dog on December 23, 2015]

American Creed=

Free minds, free markets, freedom of speech, freedom of religion, freedom of contract, right of self-defense (hence guns and knives, etc) property rights, privacy, all connected with responsibility for the consequences of one's action. 

All this from our Creator, not the State nor majority vote.

« Last Edit: November 11, 2019, 11:28:52 AM by Crafty_Dog »

ccp

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illegals have far many more
« Reply #1605 on: November 13, 2019, 05:07:23 PM »
powerful , connected , and rich friends than I do that is for sure:

https://townhall.com/columnists/michellemalkin/2019/11/13/meet-the-american-students-last-lobby-n2556395

It pays to know someone.....it pays to be illegal.... it pays to have anchor babies.

The rest of us not connected powerful or rich get the shaft as always........



Crafty_Dog

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The Geopolitics of Immigration
« Reply #1606 on: November 29, 2019, 11:18:00 AM »
Note that this was written in 2004

N GEOPOLITICS
The Geopolitics of Immigration
9 MINS READ
Nov 28, 2019 | 10:00 GMT
.

(GUILLERMO ARIAS/AFP/Getty Images)
EDITOR'S NOTE:
Pilgrim and Puritan settlers who arrived in New England in the early 17th century brought with them the tradition of Thanksgiving that was adopted by waves of immigrants who followed. This analysis first published Jan. 15, 2004, examines the role immigration has played — and continues to play — in the evolution of the United States.

The United States came into being through mass movements of populations. The movements came in waves from all over the world and, depending upon the historical moment, they served differing purposes, but there were two constants. First, each wave served an indispensable economic, political, military or social function. The United States — as a nation and regime — would not have evolved as it did without them. Second, each wave of immigrants was viewed ambiguously by those who were already in-country. Depending upon the time or place, some saw the new immigrants as an indispensable boon; others saw them as a catastrophe. The debate currently under way in the United States is probably the oldest in the United States: Are new immigrants a blessing or catastrophe? So much for the obvious.

What is interesting about the discussion of immigration is the extent to which it is dominated by confusion, particularly about the nature of immigrants. When the term "immigrant" is used, it is frequently intended to mean one of two things: Sometimes it means non-U.S. citizens who have come to reside in the United States legally. Alternatively, it can mean a socially or linguistically distinct group that lives in the United States regardless of legal status. When you put these together in their various permutations, the discourse on immigration can become chaotic. It is necessary to simplify and clarify the concept of "immigrant."

Initial U.S. immigration took two basic forms. There were the voluntary migrants, ranging from the Europeans in the 17th century to Asians today. There were the involuntary migrants — primarily Africans — who were forced to come to the continent against their will. This is one of the critical fault lines running through U.S. history. An immigrant who came from China in 1995 has much more in common with the Puritans who arrived in New England more than 300 years ago than either has with the Africans. The former came by choice, seeking solutions to their personal or political problems. The latter came by force, brought here to solve the personal or political problems of others. This is one fault line.

The second fault line is between those who came to the United States and those to whom the United States came. The Native American tribes, for example, were conquered and subjugated by the immigrants who came to the United States before and after its founding. It should be noted that this is a process that has taken place many times in human history. Indeed, many Native American tribes that occupied the United States prior to the foreign invasion had supplanted other tribes — many of which were obliterated in the process. Nevertheless, in a strictly social sense, Native American tribes were militarily defeated and subjugated, their legal status in the United States was sometimes ambiguous and their social status was frequently that of outsiders. They became immigrants because the occupants of the new United States moved and dislocated them.

There was a second group of people in this class: Mexicans. A substantial portion of the United States, running from California to Texas, was conquered territory, taken from Mexico in the first half of the 19th century. Mexico existed on terrain that Spain had seized from the Aztecs, who conquered it from prior inhabitants. Again, this should not be framed in moral terms. It should be framed in geopolitical terms.

When the United States conquered the southwest, the Mexican population that continued to inhabit the region was not an immigrant population, but a conquered one. As with the Native Americans, this was less a case of them moving to the United States than the United States moving to them.

The response of the Mexicans varied, as is always the case, and they developed a complex identity. Over time, they accepted the political dominance of the United States and became, for a host of reasons, U.S. citizens. Many assimilated into the dominant culture. Others accepted the legal status of U.S. citizens while maintaining a distinct cultural identity. Still others accepted legal status while maintaining intense cultural and economic relations across the border with Mexico. Others continued to regard themselves primarily as Mexican.

The U.S.-Mexican border is in some fundamental ways arbitrary. The line of demarcation defines political and military relationships, but does not define economic or cultural relationships. The borderlands — and they run hundreds of miles deep into the United States at some points — have extremely close cultural and economic links with Mexico. Where there are economic links, there always are movements of population. It is inherent.

The persistence of cross-border relations is inevitable in borderlands that have been politically and militarily subjugated, but in which the prior population has been neither annihilated nor expelled.

Where the group on the conquered side of the border is sufficiently large, self-contained and self-aware, this condition can exist for generations. A glance at the Balkans offers an extreme example. In the case of the United States and its Mexican population, it also has continued to exist.

This never has developed into a secessionist movement, for a number of reasons. First, the preponderance of U.S. power when compared to Mexico made this a meaningless goal. Second, the strength of the U.S. economy compared to the Mexican economy did not make rejoining Mexico attractive. Finally, the culture in the occupied territories evolved over the past 150 years, yielding a complex culture that ranged from wholly assimilated to complex hybrids to predominantly Mexican. Secessionism has not been a viable consideration since the end of the U.S. Civil War. Nor will it become an issue unless a remarkable change in the balance between the United States and Mexico takes place.

It would be a mistake, however, to think of the cross-border movements along the Mexican-U.S. border in the same way we think of the migration of people to the United States from other places such as India or China, which are an entirely different phenomenon — part of the long process of migrations to the United States that has taken place since before its founding. In these, individuals made decisions — even if they were part of a mass movement from their countries — to move to the United States and, in moving to the United States, to adopt the dominant American culture to facilitate assimilation. The Mexican migrations are the result of movements in a borderland that has been created through military conquest and the resulting political process.

The movement from Mexico is, from a legal standpoint, a cross-border migration. In reality, it is simply an internal migration within a territory whose boundaries were superimposed by history. Put differently, if the United States had lost the Mexican-American war, these migrations would be no more noteworthy than the mass migration to California from the rest of the United States in the middle of the 20th century. But the United States did not lose the war — and the migration is across international borders.

It should be noted that this also distinguishes Mexican population movements from immigration from other Hispanic countries. The closest you can come to an equivalent is in Puerto Rico, whose inhabitants are U.S. citizens due to prior conquest. They neither pose the legal problems of Mexicans nor can they simply slip across the border.

The Mexican case is one-of-a-kind, and the difficulty of sealing the border is indicative of the real issue. There are those who call for sealing the border and, technically, it could be done although the cost would be formidable. More important, turning the politico-military frontier into an effective barrier to movement would generate social havoc. It would be a barrier running down the middle of an integrated social and economic reality. The costs for the region would be enormous, piled on top of the cost of walling off the frontier from the Gulf of Mexico to the Pacific.

If the U.S. goal is to create an orderly migration process from Mexico, which fits into a broader immigration policy that includes the rest of the world, that probably cannot be done. Controlling immigration in general is difficult, but controlling the movement of an indigenous population in a borderland whose frontiers do not cohere to social or economic reality is impossible.

This is not intended to be a guide to social policy. Our general view is that social policies dealing with complex issues usually have such wildly unexpected consequences that it is more like rolling the dice than crafting strategy. We nevertheless understand that there will be a social policy, hotly debated by all sides that will wind up not doing what anyone expects, but actually will do something very different.

The point we are trying to make is simpler. First, the question of Mexican population movements has to be treated completely separately from other immigrations. These are apples and oranges. Second, placing controls along the U.S.-Mexican frontier is probably impossible. Unless we are prepared to hermetically seal the frontier, populations will flow endlessly around barriers, driven by economic and social factors. Mexico simply does not end at the Mexican border, and it hasn't since the United States defeated Mexico. Neither the United States nor Mexico can do anything about the situation.

The issue, from our point of view, cuts to the heart of geopolitics as a theory. Geopolitics argues that geographic reality creates political, social, economic and military realities. These can be shaped by policies and perhaps even controlled to some extent, but the driving realities of geopolitics can never simply be obliterated, except by overwhelming effort and difficulty. The United States is not prepared to do any of these things and, therefore, the things the United States is prepared to do are doomed to ineffectiveness.


ccp

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illegal immigrants who worked for Trump
« Reply #1608 on: December 05, 2019, 06:24:59 AM »
as always the LEFTist media twists the logic around for the advantage of the Democratic Party:

the illegals are now portrayed as heroes while Trump the villain:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/how-two-undocumented-housekeepers-took-on-the-president--and-revealed-trumps-long-term-reliance-on-illegal-immigrants/2019/12/04/3dff5b5c-0a15-11ea-bd9d-c628fd48b3a0_story.html






ccp

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ccp

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Protecting the Right to Organize, or PRO Act
« Reply #1610 on: December 08, 2019, 08:35:42 AM »
This is classic corrupt Democratic machine politics
gaining control over  labor and using them to garner more votes:

https://pjmedia.com/trending/dangerous-pro-act-would-give-illegal-workers-more-rights-than-americans/

"open ballots"  nothing more corrupt then that !

the fact that we are talking illegals - well how corrupt is that !

ccp

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how long till they can vote
« Reply #1611 on: December 16, 2019, 03:37:48 PM »
https://pjmedia.com/trending/new-jersey-gives-illegals-drivers-licenses-how-long-before-they-get-the-vote/

by November of 2020 for sure

The Dems don't care about us - only their own power



« Last Edit: December 16, 2019, 03:49:42 PM by ccp »

G M

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Re: how long till they can vote
« Reply #1612 on: December 16, 2019, 03:55:06 PM »




DougMacG

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Re: Immigration issues, illegal border crossings
« Reply #1616 on: January 06, 2020, 10:49:43 AM »
The number of families caught crossing illegally went from 84,486 in May to a mere 9,000 in November.

As the El Paso Times put it, “the policy has proved to be a virtual wall.”

https://issuesinsights.com/2020/01/06/trump-is-quietly-winning-bigly-at-the-border/

Crafty_Dog

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Re: Immigration issues
« Reply #1617 on: January 06, 2020, 02:34:15 PM »
Two more promises kept!  Please post on that thread  :-)

DougMacG

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Crafty_Dog

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Re: Immigration issues
« Reply #1620 on: January 14, 2020, 10:40:26 AM »
Generally, lets use the Homeland Security thread for Border Defense matters.





ccp

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Re: Immigration issues
« Reply #1625 on: January 26, 2020, 05:45:39 PM »
"Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington, PA-NJ-DE-MD MSA   5,971,483   5,604,740   350,609   6.3%"

ccp

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percent Spanish in this area
« Reply #1626 on: January 26, 2020, 05:49:57 PM »
Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington, PA-NJ-DE-MD MSA   5,971,483   5,604,740   350,609   6.3%

interesting because I was just at the Camden NJ DMV getting one of those "real ID's " this past week
and there were maybe 4 white,  6 American Blacks and everyone else (~ 40) was Latino.
HOw many born here or arrived here , legal or not I have no idea.

not so much Mexican but more like Caribbeana - DRs etc,  one said from Venezuela .........

Enjoyed the tour of the battleship New Jersey afterwards .......


ccp

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exception
« Reply #1628 on: February 01, 2020, 06:59:14 AM »
I feel we should make and exception to the controlling immigration

Venezuelan girls can have an easy route to green cards .
 
https://www.google.com/search?q=venezuelan+girls&tbm=isch&source=univ&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwj4tpHszrDnAhUKl3IEHU27DhMQsAR6BAgKEAE&biw=1440&bih=789

 :wink: :-D

Crafty_Dog

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Re: Immigration issues
« Reply #1629 on: February 01, 2020, 08:37:50 AM »
 :evil:


ccp

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Tucker on immigration
« Reply #1631 on: February 07, 2020, 02:55:17 PM »
".https://www.foxnews.com/opinion/tucker-carlson-criminals-would-be-protected-from-deportation-under-bill-aoc-and-other-house-democrats-back"

Last night, I told Katherine I added 6 months to my life watching this on Tucker.

I haven't laughed that hard in months. 

He is so funny when dismembering the logic of the Left.


Crafty_Dog

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Re: Immigration issues
« Reply #1632 on: February 07, 2020, 06:00:38 PM »
Don't agree with much of his analysis of Middle East and of Russia, but love him.  Super bright, super articulate, spectacular rhetorical pugilist, class act (most of the time!) and true American.  I watch him every night without fail.

G M

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Re: Immigration issues
« Reply #1633 on: February 07, 2020, 09:14:48 PM »
Don't agree with much of his analysis of Middle East and of Russia, but love him.  Super bright, super articulate, spectacular rhetorical pugilist, class act (most of the time!) and true American.  I watch him every night without fail.

So glad he got rid of the douche-y bow tie.

ccp

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mulvany wants more immigrants
« Reply #1634 on: February 21, 2020, 05:25:02 AM »
« Last Edit: February 21, 2020, 05:30:04 AM by ccp »

Crafty_Dog

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Re: Immigration issues
« Reply #1635 on: February 21, 2020, 07:33:41 AM »
Not sure what his thinking is, but it is worth noting that

a) the ratio of working people to retired people continues to decline (2 to 1? now and headed lower)
b) US birth rate below replacement
c) millions of jobs going unfilled because of lack of qualified people