Author Topic: Epidemics: Bird Flu, TB, AIDs, Superbugs, Ebola, etc  (Read 106633 times)

Crafty_Dog

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G M

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ccp

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professor Obama
« Reply #502 on: April 04, 2020, 04:34:54 PM »
rapidly accelerated the PC of  CDC

like he did with the military and everywhere else. the military

"CDC has a history of wasting money on everything from a $106 million visitor's center with Japanese gardens, a $200K gym, a transgender beauty pageant, not to mention promoting bike paths."   :-o


Mr Greenfield forgot to mention
the PC correct
 CDC's push against *climate change and pollution*
I saw exhibits about this in their museum when I was there
in '16

"

the obesity thing while nice is doomed to fail when we have pizza and chinese and fast food every square 1/2 mile in the country
and we work at desks all day from home (like the overweight author of this post) and

unless GM is right and we go back to the stone age and thus will lose weight from starvation I still think obesity treatment has the best hope of success coming from the drug industry
but nothing soon........as far as I know.


G M

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Re: professor Obama
« Reply #503 on: April 04, 2020, 05:00:29 PM »
I don't think we are headed quite back to the stone age (Short of a massive EMP striking the CONUS). I do think the world's debt driven fake economics are finally hitting the wall, with serious kinetic force.


rapidly accelerated the PC of  CDC

like he did with the military and everywhere else. the military

"CDC has a history of wasting money on everything from a $106 million visitor's center with Japanese gardens, a $200K gym, a transgender beauty pageant, not to mention promoting bike paths."   :-o


Mr Greenfield forgot to mention
the PC correct
 CDC's push against *climate change and pollution*
I saw exhibits about this in their museum when I was there
in '16

"

the obesity thing while nice is doomed to fail when we have pizza and chinese and fast food every square 1/2 mile in the country
and we work at desks all day from home (like the overweight author of this post) and

unless GM is right and we go back to the stone age and thus will lose weight from starvation I still think obesity treatment has the best hope of success coming from the drug industry
but nothing soon........as far as I know.

ccp

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Re: Epidemics: Bird Flu, TB, AIDs, Superbugs, Ebola, etc
« Reply #504 on: April 04, 2020, 05:10:19 PM »
".I do think the world's debt driven fake economics are finally hitting the wall, with serious kinetic force."

yup






Crafty_Dog

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« Last Edit: April 05, 2020, 01:26:05 PM by Crafty_Dog »

DougMacG

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Re: Epidemics: Bird Flu, TB, AIDs, Superbugs, Ebola, etc
« Reply #510 on: April 05, 2020, 11:35:03 AM »
"CDC has a history of wasting money on everything from a $106 million visitor's center with Japanese gardens, a $200K gym, a transgender beauty pageant, not to mention promoting bike paths."

Yes.  I was wondering if we would find out where they were spending their time and our money while they weren't doing their job.

G M

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Crafty_Dog

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Re: Epidemics: Bird Flu, TB, AIDs, Superbugs, Ebola, etc
« Reply #512 on: April 05, 2020, 01:27:22 PM »
Doug:

What is the URL of that big WaPo article you pasted for me?

ccp

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VDH. typical American response
« Reply #513 on: April 05, 2020, 04:31:51 PM »
The VIRUS has awakened a "sleeping giant":


https://www.nationalreview.com/2020/04/coronavirus-pandemic-america-still-global-leader-time-crisis/

so who might be its critics. ?   :wink: :roll:


DougMacG

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Two treatment approaches, immediate best bets, Dr. Scott Gottlieb
« Reply #515 on: April 05, 2020, 06:03:47 PM »
https://www.wsj.com/articles/bet-big-on-treatments-for-coronavirus-11586102963?mod=hp_opin_pos_1

Antivirals and antibody therapies are showing promise. The FDA needs to step up its pace.
By Scott Gottlieb
April 5, 2020 12:09 pm ET

Gilead Sciences produces remdesivir, an antiviral drug that shows promise in treating Covid-19.
PHOTO: OLIVIER DOULIERY/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Some imagine that the coronavirus will run its tragic course in the spring, with the direst results avoided by intense social-distancing and other mitigation efforts, and then our lives can more or less return to normal in the summer.

But that isn’t realistic. Even if new cases start to stall in the summer heat, the virus will return in the fall, and so will fresh risk of large outbreaks and even a new epidemic. People will still be reluctant to crowd into stores, restaurants or arenas. Schools may remain closed. The public’s fears won’t relent simply because there are fewer new cases. We’ll be running an 80% economy.

The only way out is with technology. Aggressive surveillance and screening can help warn of new infection clusters that could turn into outbreaks, but that won’t be enough. A vaccine could beat the virus, but there won’t be one this year. The best near-term hope: an effective therapeutic drug. That would be transformative, and it’s plausible as soon as this summer. But the process will have to move faster.

Americans would have the confidence to return to work, even if the virus is still circulating in the fall, if they knew that a robust screening system is in place to identify and arrest new outbreaks and medication can significantly reduce the chance of becoming severely ill. Kevin Warsh, a former Federal Reserve governor, estimates that such a drug could restore at least $1 trillion in economic activity.

Given the enormous public-health and economic stakes, it is worth doing whatever it takes to move such a drug to market. There are two promising approaches, and both could be available soon if government and private industry do things right. It’s time to place some firm bets and put resources behind these experimental treatments.

One approach involves antiviral drugs that target the virus and block its replication. Think of medicines for treating influenza, HIV or cold sores. The drugs work by blocking the mechanisms that viruses use to replicate. Dozens of promising antiviral drugs are in various stages of development and could be advanced quickly. The one furthest along is remdesivir, from Gilead Sciences. There’s evidence from clinical experience with Covid-19 patients that it could be effective.

The other approach involves antibody drugs, which mimic the function of immune cells. Antibody drugs can be used to fight an infection and to reduce the risk of contracting Covid-19. These medicines may be the best chance for a meaningful near-term success.

Antibody drugs are based on the same scientific principles that make “convalescent plasma” one interim tactic for treating the sickest Covid-19 patients. Doctors are taking blood plasma from patients who have recovered from Covid-19 and infusing it into those who are critically ill. The plasma is laden with antibodies, and the approach shows some promise. The constraint: There isn’t enough plasma from recovered patients to go around.

Antibody drugs are engineered to do the same thing as convalescent plasma, but because they’re synthesized, they don’t depend on a supply of antibodies from healed patients. Biotech companies would manufacture them in large quantities using recombinant technology, the same approach behind highly effective drugs that target and prevent Ebola, respiratory syncytial virus and other infections. The antibodies can also be a prophylaxis given to those exposed to Covid-19, or to prevent infection in vulnerable patients, such as those on chemotherapy. These drugs could protect the public until a vaccine is available.

The biotech company Regeneron successfully developed an antibody drug to treat Ebola as well as one against MERS, a deadly coronavirus similar to Covid-19. Regeneron has an antibody drug that should enter human trials in June. Vir Biotechnology is also developing an antibody treatment for Covid-19 and says it could be ready for human trials this summer. Amgen recently started its own program with Adaptive Biotech and Eli Lilly has one as well. If these approaches work, the drugs can advance quickly, because much of the science and the safety is already well understood.

But success will require a strong sense of urgency from manufacturers—and from regulators, who need to collaborate with drug developers in innovative ways to move the most promising therapies. The Food and Drug Administration has deployed tactics in recent years to advance therapeutics aimed at rare and deadly cancers. One is real-time reviews, in which regulators work with drug developers to evaluate data as it is read out from clinical trials, instead of waiting until the trial concludes, to understand the potential benefits and risks rapidly. This has enabled drug developers to accelerate development timelines. FDA’s senior career scientists need the firm backing of political leadership to apply these and similar scientific approaches to Covid-19.

Americans’ lives won’t return to normal absent a technological breakthrough. But with some effort, American industry and government can before this fall produce therapies that save lives and restore freedom and prosperity.

Dr. Gottlieb is a resident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute and was commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, 2017-19. He serves on the boards of Pfizer and Illumina and is a partner at the venture-capital firm New Enterprise Associates.
« Last Edit: April 05, 2020, 06:39:08 PM by DougMacG »

DougMacG

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Wuhan Virus, What are the recovered from the virus numbers?
« Reply #516 on: April 06, 2020, 06:50:03 AM »
Why aren't we tracking the number who have recovered?  Those include the only people currently carrying an immunity at this point.

We have such bad data, partly because of no good testing in place.

Death toll is wrong.  Some "dead from CV19" were never tested for the virus, never had the virus.

Many who died with virus infection already had a life threatening ailment.  Some of the people with extreme old age and or life threatening illnesses die anyway, before or without coronavirus.

More are infected with the virus than we know, since almost no one is tested.  Therefore the recovery rate is higher than we think.

The real death rate is going to look more like 0.1% or 0.01%, not the 3% or 8% we were told. IMHO.

Most accurate measurements are the numbers tested with virus and hospitalized and number placed in ICU.  That does not give us an accurate percentage of the infected but it does give us a trend line that will go down when we are winning.

DougMacG

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large portion of COVID-19 patients contagious after symptoms have vanished
« Reply #517 on: April 06, 2020, 07:24:13 AM »
https://www.universal-sci.com/headlines/2020/4/1/scientists-warn-that-many-covid-19-patients-are-still-contagious-after-their-symptoms-have-vanished

Researchers warn that a large portion of COVID-19 patients remain contagious for quite some time after their symptoms have vanished

[small sample]


ccp

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newt on US second wave
« Reply #519 on: April 06, 2020, 09:54:01 AM »
not very specific

just a general we gotta get people to work business open and people not to be afraid of each other

a more "individualistic" approach:

https://www.newsmax.com/politics/gingrich-italy-southkorea-pandemic/2020/04/06/id/961509/

Of course the Left is already criticizing Trump before we even know what is going to happen:

What's your plan for the future Mr Trump the CNN attack dog barks with angry facial expression  on his weekend show last night.

As though Trump has done nothing and is not every day working on this like a bipolar person in the manic phase

BTW , interesting theory is that Florence Nightingale , seen working night and day in the soldier's hospital during the Crimean War
  must have been bipolar to have been physically able to do what she did
   NO ONE could keep up with her 24/7 work to help the injured and dying

Few can keep up with Trump. - (tho he is not bipolar .)
   



Crafty_Dog

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Evil Chinese Scientist
« Reply #521 on: April 06, 2020, 12:01:35 PM »

ccp

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Re: Epidemics: Bird Flu, TB, AIDs, Superbugs, Ebola, etc
« Reply #522 on: April 06, 2020, 12:34:38 PM »
viagra is used for pulmonary artery hypertension


Crafty_Dog

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Tucker scares the hell outta me!
« Reply #523 on: April 06, 2020, 08:00:41 PM »

Crafty_Dog

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Crafty_Dog

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« Last Edit: April 07, 2020, 09:45:08 AM by Crafty_Dog »

ccp

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Yes a very intriguing "coincidence"
« Reply #526 on: April 07, 2020, 08:54:02 AM »
That the Chinese viral just happens to be in Wuhan.

"CHINESE RESEARCHERS: Coronavirus bats linked to Chinese gov't LABS, not wet markets"

FAuci says he trusts his Chinese colleagues who say this theory that the virus purposely or accidentally originated for bat to human transfer from eating animal meat
is naive .

How would even most of then know?
They hear the same propaganda we do
and why are they going to come out to say otherwise when they see researches and doctors being arrested
disappear or die.

Crafty_Dog

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Re: Epidemics: Bird Flu, TB, AIDs, Superbugs, Ebola, etc
« Reply #527 on: April 07, 2020, 09:48:35 AM »
Doug:

Can you dig up the URL for your Repy #499? 


G M

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Coronavirus may have accidentally leaked from a Chinese lab?
« Reply #529 on: April 07, 2020, 11:22:36 AM »
https://www.businessinsider.sg/boris-johnson-government-coronavirus-may-leaked-chinese-laboratory-covid-2020-4

Boris Johnson’s government has considered the possibility that the coronavirus may have accidentally leaked from a Chinese lab
Adam Payne, Business Insider USApril 6, 2020
A laboratory technician working on samples to be tested for the new coronavirus at the
A laboratory technician working on samples to be tested for the new coronavirus at the “Fire Eye” laboratory in the city of Wuhan in China’s central Hubei province. Getty
The UK government reportedly believes the coronavirus outbreak may have started in a Chinese laboratory.
Most experts believe the outbreak began when animals passed the virus to humans in China, specifically in or near a market in the city of Wuhan where live animals were sold.
Some scientists, however, believe an accidental leak is a plausible alternative theory – and the Mail on Sunday said UK officials were not ruling it out.
A UK parliamentary committee last week accused the Chinese government of spreading disinformation about the origins of the virus.
“Perhaps it is no coincidence that there is that laboratory in Wuhan,” one UK government official told the Mail on Sunday.
Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.
The UK government believes the novel coronavirus may have accidentally leaked from a laboratory in the Chinese city of Wuhan where scientists were researching viruses, according to a Mail on Sunday newspaper report.

Most experts believe the outbreak of the virus began with animals passing the disease to humans in or near a market in the Chinese city of Wuhan where live animals were sold.

The Mail on Sunday report, however, says that while officials in Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s government believe this is still the most likely explanation, it is “no longer being discounted” that a leak from a nearby laboratory actually caused the outbreak.

“There is a credible alternative view [to the zoonotic theory] based on the nature of the virus,” a member of the UK government’s emergency committee of senior officials, Cobra, told the newspaper. “Perhaps it is no coincidence that there is that laboratory in Wuhan. It is not discounted.”

There are two scientific labs close to Wuhan where scientists are believed to have been carrying out tests on viruses: the Institute of Virology and the Wuhan Center for Disease Control.

Both are within 10 miles of the animal market where the outbreak is widely believed to have started late last year.

Some scientists in the US believe an accidental laboratory leak is a plausible theory, The Washington Post columnist David Ignatius said last week.

One biologist Ignatius pointed to was Richard Ebright, a professor at Rutgers University’s Waksman Institute of Microbiology.

Ebright was quoted in the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists as saying many of the scientists in Wuhan who had been researching viruses had only “minimal protections” against infection.

“Virus collection, culture, isolation, or animal infection at BSL-2 [moderate biosafety level] with a virus having the transmission characteristics of the outbreak virus would pose substantial risk of infection of a lab worker, and from the lab worker, the public,” he said.

He went on to say the evidence available left “a basis to rule out a lab construct, but no basis to rule out a lab accident.”

In other words, while the virus was not believed to have been created in a lab, it could have been studied in one and released in an accident.

Boris Johnson

Pippa Fowles/10 Downing Street/Handout
Johnson’s government has reportedly started to question the veracity of China’s statements regarding the coronavirus.

Last week it was reported that UK officials were furious with the Chinese state.

On March 29, the senior UK lawmaker Michael Gove told the BBC he was skeptical of China’s official virus numbers.

“The first case of coronavirus in China was established in December of last year, but it was also the case that some of the reporting from China was not clear about the scale, the nature, the infectiousness of this,” he said.

A report by the UK Parliament’s Foreign Affairs Committee last week accused the Chinese government of spreading disinformation about the spread of the virus.

“Disinformation about COVID-19 has already cost lives,” the committee said.

“It is essential that the Government issues clear and transparent messages at home to confront and rebut disinformation spread by foreign powers.”




Crafty_Dog

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Thinking about reopening
« Reply #533 on: April 08, 2020, 05:07:57 AM »
Government and Businesses Turn Attention to Eventual Reopening of $22 Trillion U.S. Economy
Once social distancing slows coronavirus pandemic, tough questions follow over how to get the nation back to work: ‘It isn’t like a light switch on and off’

A St. Louis movie theater is one of the many businesses closed during the coronavirus pandemic.
PHOTO: JEFF ROBERSON/ASSOCIATED PRESS
By Stephanie Armour and Jon Hilsenrath
Updated April 7, 2020 8:03 pm ET
SAVE
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TEXT
53
Government officials and business leaders are turning their attention to a looming challenge in the fight against the new coronavirus pandemic: Reopening a $22 trillion U.S. economy that has been shut down like never before.

With some preliminary signs that infections from the virus are slowing, the whole nation is hopeful to get back to business as soon as possible. But a host of questions arise: Under what conditions should people be allowed back to work and stay-at-home orders be lifted? How will people at work be monitored for reinfection or antibodies to prevent a resurgence of the deadly virus? Does it all happen at once or is it staggered? Who is in charge of the effort?

A sharp reduction in new infections is a critical first step, but health experts say other steps will be needed to prevent another devastating outbreak that shuts the economy down all over again. That includes building testing and surveillance systems—and a readiness to reintroduce some social distancing and other mitigations on smaller scale if necessary—to give businesses and individuals confidence that they can return to work without risking infection.

New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy Says States Need More Federal Support
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New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy Says States Need More Federal Support
New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy Says States Need More Federal Support
In an interview with WSJ’s Gerald F. Seib, New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy said there is room to be optimistic after his state saw a drop in the rate of new Covid-19 cases, but warned that more federal support is needed to continue the fight against the novel coronavirus. Photo: Associated Press
“It isn’t like a light switch on and off,” said Anthony Fauci, a member of President Trump’s task force on the pandemic, in an interview with “The Journal,” a Wall Street Journal podcast. “It’s a gradual pulling back on certain of the restrictions to try and get society a bit back to normal.”

Dr. Fauci said a first condition is a steep drop in the number of cases. “You’ve got to make sure you are absolutely going in the right direction.” Then, he said, “you gradually come back. You don’t jump into it with both feet.”

Disparate Measures
Number of states that have implemented:
Source: National Governors Association
50
49
45
29
27
15
5
Statewide school closures
Stay at home orders
Business closures
Mask policies, recommendations
Travel restrictions
State, local curfews
All
The federal government has yet to put in place the kind of nationwide testing, tracing and surveillance system that public health experts say is needed to prevent another surge in coronavirus cases when social distancing eases. That includes identifying people who are asymptomatic and can also spread the coronavirus, health experts said.

Mr. Trump said Saturday that he is considering a second coronavirus task force focused on reopening the country. The administration’s current social distancing guidelines run through April.

“It’s the health people that are going to drive the medical-related decisions,” National Economic Council Director Larry Kudlow said in an interview with Politico webcast on Tuesday. “But I still believe, hopefully and maybe prayerfully, that in the next four to eight weeks we will be able to reopen the economy, and that the power of the virus will be substantially reduced and we will be able to flatten the curve.”

The federal government has yet to release a detailed recovery strategy, so state and local leaders are scrambling to create their own approaches. As a result, the recovery process could unfold in the same patchwork fashion as the shutdown.

New York, the state hit hardest by the pandemic, is looking to join with New Jersey and Connecticut on a unified reopening approach. “We cannot restart life as we knew it without testing,” Democratic New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo tweeted Tuesday.

Democratic Gov. Phil Murphy of New Jersey, which has the second-most Covid-19 deaths, said the resumption of economic activity would be “slow and careful, because the last thing we’re going to need is going too quickly.… That’s the equivalent, I think, of throwing gasoline on the fire.”

San Miguel County in Colorado, using a test from United Biomedical, has plans to check all its residents for immunity. Republican Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker last week announced a coronavirus tracking initiative that will involve 1,000 people working at a virtual call center to trace people exposed or infected with the virus.

GOP Texas Lieut. Gov. Dan Patrick announced Tuesday he is forming a task force on how to reopen the economy, and GOP Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan has created a response team to discuss measures that must be in place for opening the state back up.

Some governors talked Tuesday with Scott Gottlieb, the former head of the Food and Drug Administration, about ways to work together or launch their own surveillance plans that would trace the disease should it resurface and spread. One idea is to galvanize congressional lawmakers to pass legislation setting a U.S. surveillance system for coronavirus in place.

Dr. Gottlieb, who ran the FDA from 2017 to 2019, released a report on the “roadmap to reopening” Tuesday with Mark McClellan, a physician and economist who ran the FDA under President George W. Bush.

“I’m worried we don’t have the systems in place to carefully reopen the economy,” Dr. Gottieb said in an interview. “You need to be able to identify people who are sick and have the tools to enforce their isolation and [tracing of people they contact]. You have to have it at a scale we’ve never done before. We need leadership.”

Dwindling Economies
With 82% of U.S. counties under lockdown, states’ economies are feeling the impact.
Daily GDP lost by state

Percentage of GDP loss

Percentage of remaining GDP

The height of the bars is proportional to

the total daily GDP of each state.

States with the largest GDP

Daily GDP

0

50

100

%

$60 billion

Calif.

Texas

N.Y.

40

Fla.

With the Covid-19 crisis, the daily GDP lost in these states is $12.5 billion.

Ill.

Pa.

Ohio

N.J.

Ga.

Wash.

Mass.

N.C.

Va.

Mich.

20

Md.

Other

states

Thirty other states and D.C. are losing a total of $4.9 billion in daily GDP.

0

Source: Moody's Analytics
Tensions are simmering, in some states, about how and when to reopen. Republican lawmakers in Pennsylvania have proposed legislation to scale back Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf’s business closure order from mid-March and create a Covid-19 emergency plan to allow businesses to reopen.

“Our governor is being overly aggressive on this, I feel,” said Matt Stuckey, president of Stuckey Automotive, which owns three dealerships in Altoona, Pa.

Democrats say the Republican proposal in the state would threaten public health and risk increasing the spread of the virus.

Many states and counties lack resources to set up their own systems for identifying infected residents and people who may have been exposed, a necessary step to contain the virus once social distancing rules have been eased.

It is unknown what role the federal government will take in running or coordinating a monitoring system once the worst effects of the crisis have eased. It is only now starting to grapple with some of these issues.

The administration, which was slow to respond to the early stages of the pandemic, began collecting key testing and epidemiological data from hospitals in late March. In the coming weeks, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention plans to deploy tests known as serology tests to find people who have immunity to the disease, including among those who didn’t have symptoms, to better assess its presence in the population.


People who lost their jobs waited in line to file for unemployment in Fort Smith, Ark., on Monday.
PHOTO: NICK OXFORD/REUTERS
Dr. Fauci suggested the federal government itself won’t take the lead on testing. “It isn’t up to the task force or necessarily the federal government to flood the country with testing,” Dr. Fauci said. “It’s in the hands of the private sector.”

About 60% of Americans say the federal government should be primarily responsible for the coronavirus response, almost double the 32% who say the states should be responsible, according to a March poll by the Kaiser Family Foundation.

Roughly one out of every 300 people in the country is now being tested, based on federal data, compared to about one out of every 100 people in Germany.

Testing is hampered by delays and shortages that limit who can get tested. It is unlikely that the problems will be resolved by the end of April, according to one person familiar with the planning.

Some health experts said any reopening scenario is likely to work like an accordion: Any easing on social distance protocols would be followed by a tightening in areas where the virus resurfaces. A vaccine is still at least 12 to 18 months away, and even that timetable is considered optimistic.

Federal Reserve officials have cautioned that state and local efforts to lift restrictions could be ineffective for the economy if they haven’t been paired with muscular measures to beef up testing for infections and to provide treatments for those infected.

Most of the hardest-hit sectors—restaurants, hospitality, travel—require workers and customers “not feel like they’re taking their health at risk,” said Boston Fed President Eric Rosengren in an interview last week. “How effective are we at getting people tested so that you feel comfortable holding the subway pole?”

Economic outcomes “are very, very dependent on the public-health outcomes,” he added.

396,223
confirmed cases in the U.S.
12,722
total deaths in the U.S.
Hawaii
Calif.
Nev.
Ariz.
N.M.
Colo.
Utah
Fla.
Texas
Okla.
Kan.
La.
Miss.
Ala.
Ga.
Ark.
Mo.
Ill.
Tenn.
Ky.
Ore.
Wash.
Wyo.
Idaho
Mont.
Neb.
S.D.
N.D.
Iowa
Wis.
Ind.
Mich.
Minn.
S.C.
N.C.
Va.
W.V.
Md.
D.C.
Del.
Ohio
Pa.
N.J.
Conn.
N.Y.
R.I.
Mass.
Vt.
N.H.
Maine
Alaska
Confirmed cases
as of Apr 7, 2020
139,900
10
New York
139,875 cases
Source: Johns Hopkins Center for Systems Science and Engineering
Some business executives are starting to look beyond the crisis to reopening. Movie-theater executives are talking to officials at the CDC about when they might reopen auditoriums, said John Fithian, chief executive of the National Association of Theatre Owners. As of this week, the theater chains hope to open around Memorial Day and use the month of June to re-acclimate moviegoers to the habit of sitting in a room with dozens of strangers.

The International Air Transport Association, a trade group, plans regional meetings with governments this month to standardize health screening at airports.

Tractor Supply, a Nashville, Tenn.-based retailer with 1,800 stores that sell animal feed and farm supplies to mostly rural customers, plans to split corporate employees into groups to reduce crowding when corporate offices reopen, said CEO Hal Lawton. The groups would be in the office on alternating days “to work in more of a social distancing kind of way,” said Mr. Lawton.

It’s not top of mind yet. “We certainly think this continues on at least until mid-May, if not end of May, end of June, before we are starting to do anything close to relaxing our existing policies,” he said.

—Kris Maher, Sarah Nassauer, Doug Cameron, Betsy McKay, Nick Timiraos, Erich Schwartzel and Kate Linebaugh contributed to this article.

DougMacG

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Virus death toll does not mean virus caused of death
« Reply #534 on: April 08, 2020, 01:18:48 PM »
Birx says government is classifying all deaths of patients with coronavirus as 'COVID-19' deaths, regardless of cause.

Nearly one million per year were already dying from heart and respiratory conditions.
-------------------------------------------------

https://www.foxnews.com/politics/birx-says-government-is-classifying-all-deaths-of-patients-with-coronavirus-as-covid-19-deaths-regardless-of-cause

The federal government is classifying the deaths of patients infected with the coronavirus as COVID-19 deaths, regardless of any underlying health issues that could have contributed to the loss of someone's life.

Dr. Deborah Birx, the response coordinator for the White House coronavirus task force, said the federal government is continuing to count the suspected COVID-19 deaths, despite other nations doing the opposite.

"There are other countries that if you had a pre-existing condition, and let's say the virus caused you to go to the ICU [intensive care unit] and then have a heart or kidney problem," she said during a Tuesday news briefing at the White House. "Some countries are recording that as a heart issue or a kidney issue and not a COVID-19 death.

"The intent is ... if someone dies with COVID-19 we are counting that," she added.
« Last Edit: April 08, 2020, 02:11:51 PM by DougMacG »

ccp

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Re: Epidemics: Bird Flu, TB, AIDs, Superbugs, Ebola, etc
« Reply #535 on: April 08, 2020, 01:32:51 PM »
well without autopsies may not be able to determine cause of death
this happens in real world too.

that said fix the  stats so democrats could use against Trump

American ingenuity is already getting us out of this.

Worst is over soon.
We will be more ready and prepared for second wave .

His caretakers will have to walk silverplugs  out of hiding  for his prepared questions and answers .

(I dare say Grannis called the bottom - yeah I know unemployment will go up and people will stay in and not shop as much
and everyone will be screaming for their bailout checks to arrive faster - with CNN right there telling as the heartbreak stories along with the negative Trump hashtag on the bottom of screen)

« Last Edit: April 08, 2020, 01:36:23 PM by ccp »

DougMacG

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Re: Epidemics: Bird Flu, TB, AIDs, Superbugs, Ebola, etc
« Reply #536 on: April 08, 2020, 02:25:04 PM »
Nice to see our Doc optimistic on the medical side of it.  This won't be easy or a return to old normal, but the worst of it is soon behind us.  Someday we will be able to buy a mask and sanitizer locally and see touchfree dispensers in public places. Better tests and treatments are coming and eventually a vaccine.

Maybe we will be better prepared for the next disaster because of this experience.




G M

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Re: Epidemics: Bird Flu, TB, AIDs, Superbugs, Ebola, etc
« Reply #537 on: April 08, 2020, 02:35:28 PM »
I see a lot of rough sledding in front of us.

Hopefully we as individuals and as a nation will work to become more ready for the next one.


Nice to see our Doc optimistic on the medical side of it.  This won't be easy or a return to old normal, but the worst of it is soon behind us.  Someday we will be able to buy a mask and sanitizer locally and see touchfree dispensers in public places. Better tests and treatments are coming and eventually a vaccine.

Maybe we will be better prepared for the next disaster because of this experience.

Crafty_Dog

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Eh tu Pravda on the Hudson? NY's fukkups
« Reply #538 on: April 08, 2020, 08:16:13 PM »
Even with the obligatory "Orange Man Bad", lies of omission, and obfuscating evasions, Pravda on the Hudson is forced to begin looking in the mirror , ,

Some really good details in here.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/08/nyregion/new-york-coronavirus-response-delays.html?smid=fb-share



DougMacG

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Re: The Atlantic: Frum: Orange Man Bad
« Reply #541 on: April 09, 2020, 06:07:21 AM »
Without clicking on the link, do the critics ever mention how bold, prescient and  controversial the travel bans were?  W.H.O. said travel ban was not necessary or helpful.  Trump right, experts wrong.

Did the article mention Obama administration depleting mask inventory and not replaciing, not notifying the new administration?

Most of all, blaming Trump is probably just bad politics.  November will be a choice of direction for going forward from there.

G M

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Re: The Atlantic: Frum: Orange Man Bad
« Reply #542 on: April 09, 2020, 06:36:30 AM »
This was from the WHO on Jan 14, 2020:

https://mobile.twitter.com/WHO/status/1217043229427761152


Without clicking on the link, do the critics ever mention how bold, prescient and  controversial the travel bans were?  W.H.O. said travel ban was not necessary or helpful.  Trump right, experts wrong.

Did the article mention Obama administration depleting mask inventory and not replaciing, not notifying the new administration?

Most of all, blaming Trump is probably just bad politics.  November will be a choice of direction for going forward from there.

Crafty_Dog

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WSJ: Haywire Immune Response eyed in ChiCom Cootie deaths
« Reply #543 on: April 09, 2020, 12:04:30 PM »
Haywire Immune Response Eyed In Coronavirus Deaths, Treatment
Researchers are looking at treatments to suppress ‘cytokine storm,’ increasingly linked to the most severe Covid-19 cases

A laboratory at Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, whose anti-inflammatory drug is being tested to treat Covid-19.
PHOTO: REGENERON PHARMACEUTICALS INC.
By Joseph Walker and Jared S. Hopkins
April 9, 2020 7:00 am ET

An immune system gone haywire may be doing more damage than the coronavirus itself in patients with the severest forms of Covid-19, doctors and scientists say, a growing theory that could point the way to potential treatments.

Much remains unknown about the path the virus takes in the sickest patients, but an increasing number of experts believe a hyperactive immune response, rather than the virus, is what ultimately kills many Covid-19 patients.

The out-of-control immune response eventually causes the patients’ lungs to stop delivering oxygen to the rest of organs, leading to respiratory failure and in some cases death, the experts say. The malfunctioning immune system may be driving the rapid decline in lung function experienced by some patients, including younger and relatively healthy ones, after the initial onset of symptoms, doctors say.

Anatomy of a Cytokine Storm

An overactive immune response is thought to play a role in the disease progression of the sickest Covid-19 patients.

1

Coronavirus infects lung cells.

2

Lung Cells

Immune cells, including macrophages, identify the virus and produce cytokines, part of the body's inflammatory response against infection.

2

Macrophage

3

Fibrin

Alveoli

3

4

Cytokines attract more immune cells, such as white blood cells, which in turn produce more cytokines, creating a cycle of inflammation that damages the lung cells.

5

Cytokines

Capillary

White blood cells

Red cells

4

5

Damage can occur through the formation of fibrins, scar tissue that impede oxygen from passing into the bloodstream.

Weakened blood vessels allow fluid to seep in and fill the lung cavities, leading to respiratory failure.

Sources: Randy Q. Cron, University of Alabama at Birmingham; Autoimmunity Reviews

Alberto Cervantes and Josh Ulick /THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
As scientists race to better understand the phenomena, pharmaceutical companies including Roche Holding AG are partnering with hospitals to explore whether drugs proven to tamp down an out-of-control immune response could help the sickest Covid-19 patients.

Some doctors are already administering the drugs to patients who are unable to breathe without the support of ventilators, or to prevent deterioration of patients who appear ready to slip into respiratory failure.


“You remove one piece of the storm, and it can quiet the whole thing,” said Kevin Tracey, president of the Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research at Northwell Health, which is testing Kevzara, an anti-inflammatory drug from Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc.

Doctors have used the term “cytokine storm” to describe an overactive immune response triggered by external pathogens such as bacterial and viral infections.

Proteins called cytokines are part of the immune system’s arsenal for fighting disease. When too many are released into the bloodstream too quickly, however, it can have disastrous results, including organ failure and death.

As with other diseases, it is a mystery why cytokine storms are experienced by some but not all Covid-19 patients, doctors say. Genetics may be a factor.

In the most severe coronavirus patients, the disease appears to have two stages, doctors and researchers say. First the immune system fails to respond quickly or effectively enough to the virus. Then the immune response becomes too aggressive and floods the body with cytokines.

The surge of cytokines damages blood vessels and allows fluids to seep into the lungs, filling them up like water balloons, doctors say.

“The virus initiated it,” said Ya-Chi Ho, an assistant professor at the Yale School of Medicine who studies infectious diseases. “The second problem is our immune system handled it wrong, and induces this cytokine storm and clogs our lungs. That’s why patients die.”


Drugs called corticosteroids can be used to treat patients with cytokine storms, but studies are mixed on their effectiveness, with some studies indicating that Covid-19 patients may be at a higher risk of death when treated with steroids. Some doctors are reluctant to use steroids because they broadly dampen the immune response, which is risky in patients fighting infections.

Drugs targeting specific cytokines rather than the entire immune system may be more effective, doctors say.

Among the most promising targeted treatments, doctors say, is Roche’s rheumatoid-arthritis drug tocilizumab, which is marketed under the brand name Actemra. The drug was approved in 2017 to treat cytokine storms caused by cancer treatments known as CAR-T cell therapies.

On Tuesday, a federal agency that supports health research said it is committing $25 million to accelerate a late-stage study of Actemra in Covid-19 patients.

Last month, doctors from Seattle’s Swedish Health Services used Actemra to treat a 45-year-old emergency-room physician who was infected while caring for patients from a nursing home in Kirkland, Wash.

The man was transferred to Swedish and put on life support after his lungs and kidneys began to fail, said Samuel J. Youssef, a cardiothoracic surgeon at Swedish. Lab tests showed the man’s inflammation levels were 200 times greater than the normal range, indicating he might be suffering from a cytokine storm.

The doctors at Swedish decided to administer Actemra after discussing a small Chinese study that had shown that 21 Covid-19 patients with high levels of inflammation had been successfully treated with the drug.

Over the next two days, the patient’s inflammation levels began to decline and his blood-oxygen levels increased, Dr. Youssef said. After a week, he was well enough to be taken off life support on March 23, and was released from the hospital on Sunday.

“All we did was quiet the storm and support his body—his kidneys, his lungs, his heart—to give him the time to fight the virus,” said Dr. Youssef, who attributes the recovery both to Actemra as well as other interventions like being put on life support.


CytoDyn Inc., a Vancouver, Wash.-based biotech company, said 10 severely sick Covid-19 patients showed signs of recovering three days after being infused with its experimental HIV drug leronlimab, which may block the production of inflammatory cytokines. Three of the patients were taken off ventilators, including two who have since been discharged from care, according to CytoDyn.

The company is studying its drug in a trial for patients with mild-to-moderate symptoms and expects to start one for severely sick patients.

Swedish Orphan Biovitrum AB expects results in July from a study evaluating its rheumatoid-arthritis drug Kineret and an antibody called emapalumab in patients in Italy, said Milan Zdravkovic, Sobi’s head of research and development.

Novartis AG and Incyte Corp. said they plan to start clinical trials of their drug ruxolitinib in Covid-19 patients with cytokine storm. The drug, marketed as Jakafi in the U.S., is approved to treat rare blood cancers.

Write to Joseph Walker at joseph.walker@wsj.com and Jared S. Hopkins at jared.hopkins@wsj.com

G M

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Re: Is this a Chinese bioweapon?
« Reply #544 on: April 09, 2020, 08:11:56 PM »
https://www.zerohedge.com/geopolitical/did-china-steal-coronavirus-canada-and-weaponize-it

https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2020/jan/24/virus-hit-wuhan-has-two-laboratories-linked-chines/

https://www.nature.com/news/inside-the-%20chinese-lab-poised-to-study-world-s-most-%20dangerous-pathogens-1.21487


But worries surround the Chinese lab, too. The SARS virus has escaped from high-level containment facilities in Beijing multiple times, notes Richard Ebright, a molecular biologist at Rutgers University in Piscataway, New Jersey. Tim Trevan, founder of CHROME Biosafety and Biosecurity Consulting in Damascus, Maryland, says that an open culture is important to keeping BSL-4 labs safe, and he questions how easy this will be in China, where society emphasizes hierarchy. “Diversity of viewpoint, flat structures where everyone feels free to speak up and openness of information are important,” he says.

https://www.theepochtimes.com/coronavirusfilm?utm_source=Epoch_Times&utm_medium=Banner


ccp

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how do we know the author does not work for the Communist Party?
« Reply #545 on: April 10, 2020, 05:44:22 AM »
https://www.scmp.com/news/china/society/article/3079293/coronavirus-nature-magazine-apologises-reports-linking-covid-19

ok
a couple of ugly incidents around the world of 8 billion
is cause to apologize for speaking the truth

the virus came out of Wuhan
This is pure Chinese propaganda.

DougMacG

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Total US Deaths Down 15% in March?
« Reply #546 on: April 10, 2020, 06:54:07 AM »
I can't find my post predicting the US death rate would be unchanged under coronavirus and I have been looking for statistics on this.  I think I chickened out on posting because it is bad to sound callous on a death toll that is hitting real people and families.  But we were bound to have less death of (almost) everything else with stay at home orders, don't drive, disinfect all the time and distancing.

I heard this reported yesterday.  I am unable to verify the accuracy at this point.  Odd to have a major story reported only on conservative sites, but that happens, and the source is reported to be CDC data.  Is Snopes on this?

CDC' March 2020 there were a total of 193,000 deaths in the US.

The average number of deaths in the US for March over the four years prior to 2020 (2016 – 2019) is 227,000. The difference between this year and the average for the past four years is 34,000. [Month of March] 2020 deaths are 85% of the average of the prior four years.

https://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2020/04/strange-total-us-deaths-march-2020-actually-15-average-prior-four-years/
https://www.reddit.com/r/TheBlogFeed/comments/fxa4k9/just_for_knowing_total_us_deaths_in_march_2020/
https://gis.cdc.gov/grasp/fluview/mortality.html

ccp

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Re: Epidemics: Bird Flu, TB, AIDs, Superbugs, Ebola, etc
« Reply #547 on: April 10, 2020, 07:41:02 AM »
I am thinking
the death rate will be *less than* 0.5 %

by the time we have all the measurements.  presuming we have honest measurements.


I don't agree with right wing pundits who are poo pahing the social distancing as being not such a big factor here
I think it certainly is a major factor

I always said I agree with Rush most of the time , but not all of the time



Crafty_Dog

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ccp

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Fed OR nursing home coverups
« Reply #549 on: April 10, 2020, 08:37:49 PM »
https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/more-2-200-coronavirus-deaths-nursing-homes-federal-government-isn-n1181026

It is not in the interest of nursing homes to test for corona and have to report this.

Nursing homes get their patients from hospitals that have a variety (sometimes of NH home to choose from )

What pt is going to go to a NH known for corona when they are due to leave the hospital?