Author Topic: The War on Drugs  (Read 236362 times)


DougMacG

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Re: The War on Drugs
« Reply #501 on: September 10, 2019, 06:33:37 AM »
That seems terrible.  Maybe he will get out with a Trump pardon.  My proposal is to rate all the prisoners on all the factors, for prison budget and space purposes if nothing else, and let one out for every new one we put in.  How bad was their offense?  How bad was their prior record?  How long have they served?  How likely are they to re-commit? etc.  What is the cost/benefit of holding them longer.  This is just one more example of what government does badly.

On the other side of it, I am amazed at how small the penalties are for certain crimes.  This man sitting in a cell for decades shows us that no one is really looking at the big picture or the details or the consistency of it over time.

ccp

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Coulter: reminds us why we had a war on drugs in the first place
« Reply #502 on: September 13, 2019, 08:03:44 AM »
http://www.anncoulter.com/columns/2019-09-11.html#read_more

It took Coulter to state the obvious .

Anyone born after 2000 would never know anything she reminds about listening to the leftist do gooders now.
 (and including Jarrod)

now of course many place all this in the addiction is a disease category

if violent crime stays down it will because the criminals are moving to electronic modes of crime instead.

G M

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Re: Coulter: reminds us why we had a war on drugs in the first place
« Reply #503 on: September 13, 2019, 04:58:53 PM »
Violent crime isn't staying down.


http://www.anncoulter.com/columns/2019-09-11.html#read_more

It took Coulter to state the obvious .

Anyone born after 2000 would never know anything she reminds about listening to the leftist do gooders now.
 (and including Jarrod)

now of course many place all this in the addiction is a disease category

if violent crime stays down it will because the criminals are moving to electronic modes of crime instead.

DougMacG

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Re: Coulter: reminds us why we had a war on drugs in the first place
« Reply #504 on: September 14, 2019, 07:44:01 AM »
http://www.anncoulter.com/columns/2019-09-11.html#read_more
It took Coulter to state the obvious.
...

Yes.  We got tough on crime in black neighborhoods to protect black victims.  Someone has to correct Democrats on their false memory syndrome.  Next is for someone to expose the Democrats massive welfare system's role in perpetuating poverty that leads to drugs and violence.  We've only known about the connection for about 50 years.

Crafty_Dog

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WSJ: Does Getting Stoned Help You Get Toned?
« Reply #505 on: October 02, 2019, 12:29:40 AM »



Does Getting Stoned Help You Get Toned? Gym Rats Embrace Marijuana
Fitness junkies are making weed a part of their workout routines; ‘feel the blood flow through each specific muscle’
Nutritionist Pauline Nordin says cannabis cookies help her recover from her punishing workouts. Photo: Pauline Nordin
By Rob Copeland
Sept. 29, 2019 1:13 pm ET

Pauline Nordin is a trainer, model and licensed nutritionist. Earlier this year, she replaced the frozen peas in her freezer with 2,000 cookies.

The shortbread treats are laden with cannabis—the equivalent of about 1,500 joints. Ms. Nordin, 37 years old, says she can’t recover from her punishing workouts without them. She eats two each night before turning in.

“My lifestyle is a Ferrari and my body is a well-tuned machine,” she says. “I would never do something destructive.”

As marijuana moves into the mainstream, more athletes and fitness junkies are making weed a part of their workout routines. The burning question: Are they onto something—or just on something?
Workout aid?

Many workout fiends insist that a few drags add an extra hit to their workouts. They say it helps them ignore pain, stem off boredom and concentrate on small muscle groups that require repetitive movements.

Eleven states have legalized marijuana for adults, while twice as many allow it to treat certain medical conditions. Canada last year legalized it countrywide.

In May, a nonprofit representing more than 100 former professional athletes, including boxer Mike Tyson and cyclist Floyd Landis, petitioned the world antidoping authority to remove marijuana from its list of banned substances. Some ultramarathoners say it helps them through long races. The aroma of weed is common these days at San Francisco boot-camp fitness classes, Denver climbing walls and jiu jitsu tournaments.

“I’ll have a toke before the gym,” says Peter Kloczko, 29, of London, Ontario, “and it’s like, damn, I’m on point today.”
Share Your Thoughts

Weed and weights: Good idea or ridiculous? Join the discussion below.

Los Angeleno Artemus Dolgin, 35, at times smokes as many as 14 joints a day, many on the stoop of his gym or at home while bench pressing. Mr. Dolgin, who describes his profession as “hustler,” says it pumps up his biceps, and his self-confidence.

“You definitely feel the blood flow through each specific muscle,” he says. “The epitome of muscle building is the mind-muscle connection, which doesn’t come right away. Weed really enhances that.”

Keith Humphreys, a professor of behavioral sciences at Stanford University who specializes in addiction, says: “There’s no evidence of that whatsoever. Sort of by definition, we are not good at observing our behavior when we are under the influence of a drug.”
Sam Moses says he switched from dietary supplements and even steroids to marijuana. Photo: Sam Moses

Harvard University researchers have found that smoking marijuana raises the resting heart rate and carries other health risks.

The World Anti-Doping Agency, based in Montreal, includes marijuana on its list of banned substances for athletes competing in the Olympics and other international competitions. “Cannabis can cause muscle relaxation and reduce pain during post-workout recovery. It can also decrease anxiety and tension, resulting in better sport performance under pressure,” the agency says on its website.

The other reason WADA is harsh on weed: It might contribute to injury. The drug, it says, “can increase focus and risk-taking behaviors, allowing athletes to forget bad falls or previous trauma in sport, and push themselves past those fears in competition.”

Sam Moses of Daytona Beach, Fla., can relate. He says he was regularly using dietary supplements and even steroids when his deceased sister appeared to him in a dream. “She said, ‘Don’t worry about it, it’s just weed. It’s natural. You know your limits,’ ” says Mr. Moses, 26.

Mr. Moses, an emergency-medicine student and dedicated powerlifter, took that as a green light to switch to grass. One problem: He began getting confused about balancing weight evenly across a barbell. He recently was squatting 315 pounds of weight when he heard a crack and felt a whoosh of pain at his waist. “And that’s about when I went: F—- it, I’m getting more stoned,” he says.

Former athletes looking to reverse the ban argue that many stoners have it wrong: Weed doesn’t provide a sporting edge. While marijuana and other cannibanoids support wellness “by aiding in pain relief and rest,” the athletes wrote in a petition, “there is no evidence that they enhance sport performance.”

A series of Brazilian jiu jitsu tournaments, dubbed “High Rollerz BJJ,” aren’t waiting around for a reversal. The organization requires opponents to smoke a joint together before the start of each match. The tournament prize is a brick of pot. The audience is encouraged to light up, too.
Paul Roney says he works out right away after getting high so he doesn’t fall asleep. Photo: Paul Roney

Electrician Paul Roney discovered yet another risk to mixing weed and weights. A few weeks ago, the 45-year-old consumed a bit more than usual and then ran into a buddy at the gym. He wound up forgetting to exercise altogether.

“You have to go straightaway if you smoke a fattie,” he advises. “Wait an hour and you’re just going to be asleep on the floor.”

One thing he likes, though, is that it gives him the munchies when it’s time to load up on healthy fare such as egg whites, boiled chicken and oat bran. “You can eat all of your diet food,” he says.

Ms. Nordin, the nutritionist who emptied her freezer for the habit, estimates that 5% of her daily calorie intake is cannabis cookies, sold under the brand Dr. Norm’s.

The siblings who run the company say they named it after their late father, a dermatologist. They say they have no idea what he thought about the benefits of marijuana. He did believe, however, that laughter was the best medicine.



Crafty_Dog

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WSJ: The Marijuana Vaping Nexus
« Reply #508 on: December 27, 2019, 01:18:05 PM »
The Vaping-Marijuana Nexus
Another unintended consequence of celebrating pot use.
By The Editorial Board
Dec. 25, 2019 1:43 pm ET
Opinion: Vaping and Marijuana Are a Dangerous Combination

As marijuana use has become more socially accepted in the United States, those pushing for legalization should examine the recent harm that vaping has inflicted on thousands of people, many of whom were using marijuana products. Image: Tony Dejack/AP

A surge in vaping related lung illnesses this year caught the medical community by surprise, with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reporting more than 2,500 lung illnesses and 54 deaths. Politicians are targeting e-cigarettes, but the CDC reported last week that marijuana is so far the greatest common denominator.

This is another reminder that America is undertaking a risky social experiment by legalizing and especially destigmatizing cannabis, and the potential effects are hard to foresee or control. The same political culture that is in a fury over legal opioids, and is trying to bankrupt drug companies as compensation, seems to have no problem celebrating a drug that may be damaging young brains for a lifetime.

In October the CDC reported that 86% of 867 patients with available data had used products containing THC shortly before the onset of their symptoms while 64% reported using nicotine products. Only 11% reported using exclusively nicotine e-cigarettes. The CDC has also found that Vitamin E acetate, which is often added as a thickener to marijuana vaping fluids, is a “very strong culprit.”

Democratic Governors such as New York’s Andrew Cuomo and California’s Gavin Newsom, who have supported legalizing marijuana, are attacking nicotine e-cigarettes while ignoring the striking links to marijuana. Yet pot products unlike those with nicotine are only lightly regulated by the 11 states where cannabis has been legalized for recreational use.

One vaping-related death last month was linked to a device purchased from a legal pot shop in Oregon. A state audit this year found only 3% of recreational marijuana retailers had been inspected, and state marijuana production is seven times higher than consumption. The implication is that most pot grown in Oregon is exported to states where it is illegal.

One argument for legalizing and regulating pot is that it would shrink the black market, but there’s little evidence that it has. The California Department of Food and Agriculture found that only 16% of the 15.5 million pounds of marijuana produced in the state each year is also consumed in the state.

An audit by the United Cannabis Business Association this year turned up 2,835 unlicensed dispensaries in California—more than three times the number that are licensed. The California Department of Public Health since June has linked more than 120 cases of lung illness to recently purchased vape-pens including many bought at unlicensed shops.

Teens can’t legally purchase pot in any state, but a survey by Monitoring the Future this month found that youth marijuana vaping has nearly tripled since 2017. While overall pot use has remained flat for the past two years, daily use has increased by two-thirds. This is especially troubling since chronic use of marijuana in adolescents has been linked to cognitive impairment, anxiety and psychosis later in life.

About 95% of heroin and cocaine users report first using pot, and studies show that marijuana users require more opioid medication to cope with pain than non-users. Like all drugs, marijuana has different effects on different users that are still not well understood. While some say pot helps them relax, it can cause paranoid tendencies in others.

Older generations don’t realize that the pot grown and sold today is on average four to five times more potent than what they smoked in college. There’s also a misconception that pot is no more addictive than alcohol. About 40% of people who used pot in the last month used it daily compared to 10% of alcohol drinkers.

***
Political leaders and cultural trend-setters have removed the social stigma around pot use, so it is socially acceptable even where it remains illegal. Rarely can you take a walk in New York City without marijuana smoke wafting into your nostrils.

While tobacco and e-cigarettes are denounced, smoking a joint is chill, man, and young people get the message. A mere 30.3% of 12th graders this year said smoking pot regularly was risky, down from 77.8% in 1990 and 52.4% a decade ago, according to the Monitoring the Future study. Teens say pot is less risky than e-cigarettes (38%) and easier to obtain (78.4%) than regular cigarettes (72.4%).

A large business lobby is now pushing for pot legalization. The rash of vaping deaths and illnesses shows that pot is more dangerous than people realize, and Americans should pause on the rush to legalize until we understand how much medical and social harm it is doing.

G M

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Re: WSJ: The Marijuana Vaping Nexus
« Reply #509 on: December 27, 2019, 05:35:13 PM »
Our finest Libertarian theorists told us this was UNPOSSIBLE!!!!!!!


The Vaping-Marijuana Nexus
Another unintended consequence of celebrating pot use.
By The Editorial Board
Dec. 25, 2019 1:43 pm ET
Opinion: Vaping and Marijuana Are a Dangerous Combination

As marijuana use has become more socially accepted in the United States, those pushing for legalization should examine the recent harm that vaping has inflicted on thousands of people, many of whom were using marijuana products. Image: Tony Dejack/AP

A surge in vaping related lung illnesses this year caught the medical community by surprise, with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reporting more than 2,500 lung illnesses and 54 deaths. Politicians are targeting e-cigarettes, but the CDC reported last week that marijuana is so far the greatest common denominator.

This is another reminder that America is undertaking a risky social experiment by legalizing and especially destigmatizing cannabis, and the potential effects are hard to foresee or control. The same political culture that is in a fury over legal opioids, and is trying to bankrupt drug companies as compensation, seems to have no problem celebrating a drug that may be damaging young brains for a lifetime.

In October the CDC reported that 86% of 867 patients with available data had used products containing THC shortly before the onset of their symptoms while 64% reported using nicotine products. Only 11% reported using exclusively nicotine e-cigarettes. The CDC has also found that Vitamin E acetate, which is often added as a thickener to marijuana vaping fluids, is a “very strong culprit.”

Democratic Governors such as New York’s Andrew Cuomo and California’s Gavin Newsom, who have supported legalizing marijuana, are attacking nicotine e-cigarettes while ignoring the striking links to marijuana. Yet pot products unlike those with nicotine are only lightly regulated by the 11 states where cannabis has been legalized for recreational use.

One vaping-related death last month was linked to a device purchased from a legal pot shop in Oregon. A state audit this year found only 3% of recreational marijuana retailers had been inspected, and state marijuana production is seven times higher than consumption. The implication is that most pot grown in Oregon is exported to states where it is illegal.

One argument for legalizing and regulating pot is that it would shrink the black market, but there’s little evidence that it has. The California Department of Food and Agriculture found that only 16% of the 15.5 million pounds of marijuana produced in the state each year is also consumed in the state.

An audit by the United Cannabis Business Association this year turned up 2,835 unlicensed dispensaries in California—more than three times the number that are licensed. The California Department of Public Health since June has linked more than 120 cases of lung illness to recently purchased vape-pens including many bought at unlicensed shops.

Teens can’t legally purchase pot in any state, but a survey by Monitoring the Future this month found that youth marijuana vaping has nearly tripled since 2017. While overall pot use has remained flat for the past two years, daily use has increased by two-thirds. This is especially troubling since chronic use of marijuana in adolescents has been linked to cognitive impairment, anxiety and psychosis later in life.

About 95% of heroin and cocaine users report first using pot, and studies show that marijuana users require more opioid medication to cope with pain than non-users. Like all drugs, marijuana has different effects on different users that are still not well understood. While some say pot helps them relax, it can cause paranoid tendencies in others.

Older generations don’t realize that the pot grown and sold today is on average four to five times more potent than what they smoked in college. There’s also a misconception that pot is no more addictive than alcohol. About 40% of people who used pot in the last month used it daily compared to 10% of alcohol drinkers.

***
Political leaders and cultural trend-setters have removed the social stigma around pot use, so it is socially acceptable even where it remains illegal. Rarely can you take a walk in New York City without marijuana smoke wafting into your nostrils.

While tobacco and e-cigarettes are denounced, smoking a joint is chill, man, and young people get the message. A mere 30.3% of 12th graders this year said smoking pot regularly was risky, down from 77.8% in 1990 and 52.4% a decade ago, according to the Monitoring the Future study. Teens say pot is less risky than e-cigarettes (38%) and easier to obtain (78.4%) than regular cigarettes (72.4%).

A large business lobby is now pushing for pot legalization. The rash of vaping deaths and illnesses shows that pot is more dangerous than people realize, and Americans should pause on the rush to legalize until we understand how much medical and social harm it is doing.

ccp

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Re: The War on Drugs
« Reply #510 on: December 28, 2019, 08:42:55 AM »
I like e cigarettes for people who have trouble quitting smoking cigarettes
but not for kids being cool

We have had nicotrol inhalers by prescription for many yrs

Allowing them over the counter has made  more problems than solving problems it seems.

But probably another good way to tax the shit out of people which is the ultimate source of power for those "who serve" in government.






ccp

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DougMacG

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Re: Pete has the answer - going for the drug crowd vote
« Reply #512 on: December 30, 2019, 11:13:03 AM »
legalize all drugs

https://disrn.com/news/pete-buttigieg-calls-for-decriminalization-of-all-drugs

I wonder if Little Peter has thought through the consequences of legalizing prescription drugs - isn't that part of 'all' drugs?  Maybe decriminalize other 'medical' treatments by street and sidewalk professionals as well.  Let the market sort it out.

I kind of like the idea; it would break down the entire medical cabal, no offense to our ccp.

My point is, this will never happen.  Pete hasn't thought that far through it.  He is just blowing smoke and pandering for votes. 

Cooking up a little meth for friends and family has HUGE environmental, health and safety risks, is a form of vandalism in that it can get a house condemned - and we are going to legalize it??  Maybe we can save money by building prisons with no doors, locks or guards, make attendance voluntary - right while we make government service mandatory. 

The idea that we are "over-incarcerating" is a myth.  These people aren't doing life for minor possession of harmless substances.  Turning the supply chain over to the government is not legalizing it.  Decriminalizing small amounts has not taking organized crime or violence out of the business.

Require people to take responsibility for their own heathcare before we start encouraging reckless body and brain experimentation.

Securing the border would do more than any of these ideas to get the crime out of the drug trade.