Author Topic: Education  (Read 211533 times)

DougMacG

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Education, an interesting, embattled professor, Camille Paglia, WSJ
« Reply #400 on: September 04, 2019, 06:33:34 AM »
I struggled with where to post this as it crosses lines with education, religion, gender roles, anti-victimization, economics and anti-politically-correct free speech.

https://www.wsj.com/articles/a-feminist-capitalist-professor-under-fire-11567201511

Not fair to just excerpt the parts I like.  She sings a different tune and therefore they want her out.



ccp

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another one with forgive student loans
« Reply #402 on: October 24, 2019, 09:01:52 AM »
why should the creditors be forced to eat this?

https://www.yahoo.com/finance/news/trump-education-official-resigns-student-loans-141706667.html

why not like in other markets ?

if colleges cannot get their fees down the go out of business

stop supplementing them.

I guarantee that will changes things - fast/.

Crafty_Dog

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WSJ: American School Flunk
« Reply #403 on: October 31, 2019, 03:24:08 PM »
America’s Schools Flunk
Despite more spending, test scores fall and the achievement gap grows.
By The Editorial Board
Oct. 30, 2019 6:49 pm ET

PHOTO: GETTY IMAGES/ISTOCKPHOTO
The highest-achieving students are doing better and the lowest are doing worse than a decade ago. That’s one depressing revelation from the latest Nation’s Report Card that details how America’s union-run public schools are flunking.

The results from the 2019 National Assessment of Educational Progress, which is administered to students around the country every two years, were published on Wednesday. There isn’t much to cheer. Only 35% of fourth graders rated proficient in reading, which is about the same as in 2009. Worse, students have backslid in reading over the last two years.

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While median math and reading scores have stayed about the same over the last decade, achievement gaps are increasing. Since 2009 scores for the lowest 10% of students fell by about as much as they improved for the top 10%. The 90th percentile of eighth graders in math scored about four points higher while the bottom tenth scored five points lower.

It’s also distressing that the learning gap between black and white students hasn’t budged since 2009. Hispanics showed significant improvement in reading between 1992 and 2013 but their gains have since stalled. Average scores for English-language learners have ticked up slightly since 2009, though the disparity between low-income kids and everyone else has stayed flat.

The academic stagnation has been pervasive. Over the last two years, scores in fourth-grade reading declined in 17 states while improving in one—Mississippi. Eighth graders scored lower in reading in 31 states while increasing only in Washington, D.C. Eighth-grade math scores have improved in only Washington, D.C., Mississippi and Louisiana.

Washington, D.C., has been the biggest school reform success story over the last decade. Twice as many fourth and eighth graders score proficient in math than in 2009. Proficiency in reading has likewise increased by about 10 percentage points, and the learning gap between whites and blacks has significantly shrunk. What accounts for these improvements?

For one, charter-school enrollment in Washington has increased by nearly 60% since 2009. Studies have shown that charters have increased competition and thereby raised student performance at traditional public schools. Former schools chancellor Michelle Rhee’s teacher tenure and merit pay reforms are also paying learning dividends.

The teachers unions’ answer to every education deficit is more spending. But between 2012 and 2017—the last year of available Census Bureau data—average per-pupil education spending increased by 15%. Spending has been growing at an even faster clip over the last couple of years as government revenue has recovered from the recession.

States that are spending more haven’t shown improvement. In California annual K-12 spending has increased by more than half since 2013 to $102 billion. Yet student test scores have been flat since 2013. It’s a similar story in New York, Illinois and New Jersey where Democrats have raised taxes for schools.

Much of the money has gone to fund teacher pensions and administrative positions that pad union rolls. Maybe parents should go on strike to demand more accountability from the union-run public school monopoly.

DougMacG

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Education, AOC Accidentally Makes the Case for School Choice
« Reply #404 on: December 01, 2019, 07:37:47 AM »
"The young congresswoman shared a childhood story about how her family made financial sacrifices to leave the Bronx and buy a house in Westchester so that she could attend school in a higher quality district."

https://reason.com/2019/10/22/alexandria-ocasio-cortez-accidentally-makes-the-case-for-school-choice/
---------------
Can everyone make that choice?

G M

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Re: Education, AOC Accidentally Makes the Case for School Choice
« Reply #405 on: December 02, 2019, 02:25:05 PM »
"Some animals are more equal than others".


"The young congresswoman shared a childhood story about how her family made financial sacrifices to leave the Bronx and buy a house in Westchester so that she could attend school in a higher quality district."

https://reason.com/2019/10/22/alexandria-ocasio-cortez-accidentally-makes-the-case-for-school-choice/
---------------
Can everyone make that choice?

ccp

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Crafty_Dog

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Re: Education
« Reply #407 on: January 03, 2020, 12:31:34 AM »
Exactly the right place 8-)


ccp

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Re: Education
« Reply #409 on: January 12, 2020, 02:04:22 PM »
"The letter also notes that “Qatari ‘donations’ to American colleges and universities are made strategically to advance Qatari interests.”

You mean they did it to buy influence ?  what a shock

"The universities named by the Department of Education were Georgetown, Texas A&M, Cornell, Rutgers, the University of Maryland and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

I graduated med school from Rutgers (after starting in Grenada) . Rutgers is one of the most militant progressive social justice warrior universities around
I know two people who went to Georgetown Law........  :wink:

"China, Qatar and Russia were some of the sources of foreign funding that went unreported."

I remember when I lived in Arlington outside of DC
during the Iranian crisis at the end of the Carter administration seeing hundreds of Iranians facing off Americans at the picket lines screaming down with America.  I was in shock and asked some people what are all these Iranians doing here.  The response was don't you know?  Iranians built the engineering building. ( at George Washington U.)

All for altruistic reasons.
Like the Hollywood types etc.

Crafty_Dog

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ccp

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budget proposal. to cut DOE
« Reply #411 on: February 09, 2020, 05:51:57 AM »

Crafty_Dog

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Re: Education
« Reply #412 on: February 09, 2020, 06:47:08 AM »
This is good news!

The block grants should provide some political inoculation.

Crafty_Dog

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Sarah Lawrence College
« Reply #413 on: February 12, 2020, 08:02:41 PM »

DougMacG

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Re: Sarah Lawrence College
« Reply #414 on: February 13, 2020, 05:48:06 AM »
I went to Sarah Lawrence for my first two years of college.

https://www.foxnews.com/us/former-felon-sarah-lawrence-parent-arrested-for-sex-trafficking-abusing-students

Most disturbing story I have seen in a very long time.

Crafty_Dog

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Re: Education
« Reply #415 on: February 13, 2020, 11:05:50 AM »
Rahm Emanuel went to SLC too.


DougMacG

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Harvard, with $40.9 Billion Endowment, Lays Off Dining Hall Workers
« Reply #417 on: March 26, 2020, 08:42:05 AM »
https://freebeacon.com/latest-news/harvard-not-paying-all-workers-during-coronavirus-shutdown-despite-40-9b-endowment/

Evil capitalists? No.  Evil, greedy, selfish Marxists.  Is that really who we want to rule us?  Or even to educate us?

When they re-open, let them do it without food service workers.

ccp

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Re: Education
« Reply #418 on: March 26, 2020, 07:04:59 PM »
https://freebeacon.com/latest-news/harvard-not-paying-all-workers-during-coronavirus-shutdown-despite-40-9b-endowment/

Evil capitalists? No.  Evil, greedy, selfish Marxists.  Is that really who we want to rule us?  Or even to educate us?

When they re-open, let them do it without food service workers.


watch

they probably can get something from the 2 trillion deal
most likely it wa s all harvard /wall street people coming up with the "Bail out " "for the People' for "workers and their families". rah rah

Crafty_Dog

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ccp

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Crafty_Dog

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« Last Edit: April 28, 2020, 05:11:53 PM by Crafty_Dog »


DougMacG

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Pulitzer Leftism Conspiring Leftist Media to Pollute our Education
« Reply #424 on: May 06, 2020, 06:01:01 AM »
https://pulitzercenter.org/projects/1619-project-pulitzer-center-education-programming
The Pulitzer Center is proud to be the education partner for The 1619 Project, which is inaugurated by a special issue of The New York Times Magazine. Click here for our curricular resources, including a reading guide for the issue, activities to engage students, and more.
----------------------------------

Did they mention in the award criteria, we prefer authors and publications we are in bed with?

The only problems with the 1619 Project is that, a) it is wrong from start to finish, and b) it is designed to further divide us along racial lines for at least another generation.

Or as educators might say, perfect.
« Last Edit: May 06, 2020, 06:05:35 AM by DougMacG »




Crafty_Dog

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CA drops the SATs
« Reply #428 on: May 23, 2020, 09:34:48 AM »
California’s College Testing Mistake
The state university system puts racial politics above merit.
By The Editorial Board
May 22, 2020 7:20 pm ET

Thursday’s decision by the University of California regents to eliminate the SAT and ACT in admissions is a historic blow to excellence in higher education. Applicants to the largest university system in the U.S. will now be judged entirely on how well they can flatter admissions bureaucracies with coached personal statements, as well as high school grade-point averages whose meanings are obscured by grade inflation.

The UC started using the SAT in the 1960s to find talented students from modest backgrounds. As an exhaustive faculty senate report—ignored by university leadership—put it this year, “This original intent is clearly being realized at UC.” Yet diversity bean-counting has displaced the philosophy of merit and excellence that made the UC the envy of the world in the last century. The claim that math and reading tests discriminate against minorities (except Asians) easily won the day, never mind the evidence.


California’s political class is desperate to create a different racial makeup at the UC, and it sees testing as an obstacle. The SAT shines a light on failures and inequalities in California’s public K-12 school system. Black and Hispanic students are more likely to attend low-quality schools which because of unions are nearly impossible to reform. For California’s political class the convenient solution is to ban tests—concealing the achievement gap while congratulating themselves on a commitment to equity and inclusion.

The result is that wealthy students will find the system easier to game, and more students of all races who aren’t ready will be thrust into UC schools. If that happens on a large scale, the rigor of instruction will have to fall to keep graduation rates up and the value of degrees may erode.

California was a bellwether when it started using the SAT 60 years ago, so some think this week’s move heralds the beginning of the end for testing nationwide. Yet few other schools have made moves as radical as UC’s. The University of Chicago made headlines in 2018 by going test-optional, but 85% to 90% of admitted applicants still submitted a score last year.

The higher education business model was already under pressure before the coronavirus, and the recession may force deep cuts in the UC. The regents’ political move to compromise educational quality against faculty advice does not bode well for the future of a system that for decades was an engine of opportunity.


Crafty_Dog

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Is the SAT really the problem
« Reply #429 on: May 26, 2020, 09:25:20 AM »
Is the SAT Really the Problem?
Family breakdown causes serious disadvantages when it comes to college.

By William McGurn
May 25, 2020 12:32 pm ET


When the University of California announced it will stop using the SAT and ACT for admissions, it sent tremors through the world of higher education. If only because of its sheer size—the UC system covers 285,000 students over several campuses—others are bound to follow.

Thursday’s decision by the Board of Regents was taken, as are so many decisions in academia these days, in the name of equity and diversity. Requiring SAT scores, the argument goes, discriminates against low-income, black and Latino children who perform poorly on the tests because they lack advantages such as prep courses. To amp up the pressure, a coalition of students and activist groups filed suit in November against the Board of Regents, challenging the SAT requirement on these grounds.


Undeniably wealth is a big advantage. But if the idea is to address what’s keeping children from a college degree, instead of papering over the achievement gap, it might be better to address the elephant in the room: family.

It’s taboo to raise it, but for all the invocations of “science” and “data-driven decisions,” seldom is any recognition given to what the data tell us about the most privileged kids of all: those living with their biological parents under the same roof.

“Family structure is about as important as family income in predicting who graduates from college today,” says W. Bradford Wilcox, a visiting scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, professor of sociology at the University of Virginia and a senior fellow at the Institute for Family Studies. “In the absence of SAT scores, which can pinpoint kids from difficult family backgrounds with great academic potential, family stability is likely to loom even larger in determining who makes it past the college finish line in California.”

The data are pretty conclusive. The more intact the family, the better the education outcomes. In a new IFS study released Monday, research psychologist Nicholas Zill reports that when it comes to graduation from top colleges, “students from intact families are twice as likely to do so as those from all other family types combined.”

Who Gets Through College?
Likelihood of graduating from a selective college within 10 years, by livingarrangement as a high-school sophomore
Source: Nicholas Zill for the Institute for Family Studies, May 2020
Married birth parents
Widowed mom or dad
Divorced mother
Separated/divorced dad
Adoptive parents
Birth & step parent
Foster parents
Separated mother
Cohabitating birthparents
Never married mother
Grandparents
0%
5
10
15
20
By dropping SATs, UC hopes to produce a student body that includes higher percentages of blacks and Latinos. This requires discrediting the SATs as an indicator of college performance (a point contested by the UC Academic Senate). It also requires finding a way to make room for the students it wants by reducing the number of Asian-Americans (13.6% of California’s population but 29.5% of UC undergraduates). This is why the Asian American Coalition for Education warned the regents that, without the SAT, Asian-American applicants will “become easy victims of various radical acts of racial balancing.”

Wenyuan Wu, who addressed the regents on the coalition’s behalf, tells me she cringes whenever the anti-SAT crowd invokes the “racial/socioeconomic biases argument.” She asks: “What about those Chinatown kids whose parents toil in ethnic enclaves with low incomes and tremendous language barriers?” Which raises a further indelicate question: Is it a coincidence that Asian-Americans, who disproportionately earn entry into UC, disproportionately come from intact families?

If it’s unjust that rich kids get test prep from their parents, why doesn’t the university simply come up with a good prep course and provide it free to anyone who wants it? If the rejoinder is that the wealthy kids enjoy the further advantage of better schools, why do so many SAT opponents also reject measures that might help level the playing field—vouchers and charter schools come to mind—by giving underserved kids the opportunity of going to a good school too?

The modern American university isn’t afraid to weigh in when it comes to issues outside its direct purview. Two days before UC announced its decision on the SAT, it boasted of having completely divested from fossil fuels. But when it comes to addressing a major factor keeping students out of its system and thus widening the achievement gap—crickets.

As Charles Murray noted in “Coming Apart” (2012), the data showing the advantage to children of living with their biological parents across a range of outcomes are broadly accepted by social scientists. But those data are “resolutely” ignored by “network news programs, editorial writers for the major newspapers, and politicians of both major political parties.” Not to mention the UC regents.

“Given the science,” Mr. Wilcox says, “why can’t universities bring themselves to tell the truth that if you’d like your kids to get a college degree—especially from a selective college—you’d do well to get and stay married?”

Write to mcgurn@wsj.com.

Crafty_Dog

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ccp

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when some citizens are being forced to pay more and more for everyone else
« Reply #431 on: June 23, 2020, 06:46:15 PM »
https://www.forbes.com/sites/adamminsky/2020/06/22/biden-reaffirms-plan-to-cancel-student-debt-reduce-racial-inequality/

cancel debt???

how about we make professors work for school teacher wages and lower costs

then we can see how much they like socialism
« Last Edit: June 24, 2020, 08:07:07 AM by Crafty_Dog »

DougMacG

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Education, Can't go back to school in the fall? Homeschool
« Reply #432 on: July 08, 2020, 10:34:41 AM »
The Trump Administration says, open the schools this fall. Some families have grandparents at home, don't want the kids going back to school. Fine. Homeschool. No school is not an option. The schools have more control over the kids being open then having them just run free all day.

https://fee.org/articles/back-to-school-no-thanks-say-millions-of-new-homeschooling-parents/

G M

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I think they should get 15 an hour. Seems fair.


https://www.forbes.com/sites/adamminsky/2020/06/22/biden-reaffirms-plan-to-cancel-student-debt-reduce-racial-inequality/

cancel debt???

how about we make professors work for school teacher wages and lower costs

then we can see how much they like socialism


Crafty_Dog

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Wesbury on Student Loans
« Reply #435 on: July 14, 2020, 02:25:35 PM »
Holding Colleges Accountable To view this article, Click Here
Brian S. Wesbury, Chief Economist
Robert Stein, Deputy Chief Economist
Date: 7/13/2020

It's time to think about something other than COVID, statues, the election, and defunding the police. How about higher education? Specifically, student loans and grants.

Just like the bipartisan efforts to making housing more affordable, these programs were well-intentioned. But, also like the housing market, they have led to serious problems. The US has about $1.5 trillion in student debt outstanding, more than subprime mortgage loans in 2007. We're not worried these loans will cause a collapse in the economy, but they are a major burden that must be dealt with at some point

The debate about student loans isn't easy. One side argues that, if young adults are having trouble paying, they should have known better, gone to a different college, or taken classes that taught more marketable skills. Maybe they shouldn't have gone to college at all. The other side says that's why we need to "forgive" these loans, it's not the students' fault; they were told a college degree is a key to the American Dream.

What both sides are missing is that student loans have become a jobs and wage subsidy program for college professors and administrators. They, not the students, are the primary beneficiaries. The government is using young adults to deliver money to the intellectual class, much of whom is utterly lacking in marketable skills, and deeply hostile toward Western Civilization in general (and free-market capitalism in particular).

A large portion of the revenue that funds academics' salaries comes from the government. According to the GDP accounts, the value of higher education services totaled $196 billion in 2019. Meanwhile, housing and meals at schools totaled $57 billion. For comparison, federal loans and grants totaled $134 billion in the 2018-19 school year, with an additional $13 billion in state grants. And these figures exclude direct spending sent to colleges themselves. In other words, a substantial part of college funding is supported by government spending.

Imagine if Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac announced a program to buy all the mortgages that banks made to 18 year olds who bought homes with no money down. Obviously, that policy would lead to disaster and excessive homeownership among teenagers, who would have little idea of the long-term consequences. Well, that's what's happened with colleges. Except a mortgage has a home collateralizing the loan. You can't foreclose on a degree in poetry.

Unfortunately, both sides of the political spectrum would keep the gravy train for privileged academics intact, no matter how absurd, useless, or harmful the "education" they provide, and no matter how much these institutions impinge on the free speech of their students.

So, here are some suggestions to end the windfall for the intellectual class and make them put some skin in the game.

First, just like new banking rules that were passed after the subprime crisis, let's require 50% claw-backs of federal loan money from a college if its students don't repay. If they default, students will still be on the hook for 50% themselves. And if a college thinks a defaulting former student could repay the full amount, let the college go after the student for the other 50%.

Second, because colleges have abused their charitable status and engage in political activity, they should no longer be tax exempt. Third, wealthy colleges with massive endowments should be taxed like the hedge funds that they are.

The road to hell is paved with good intentions. It's time policymakers take a different route on higher education.

ccp

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webury above :Holding Colleges Accountable
« Reply #436 on: July 15, 2020, 04:50:44 AM »
best wesbury post yet.

along the lines of my thoughts too.


ccp

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Re: Education
« Reply #437 on: July 16, 2020, 02:25:15 PM »

I don't recall students running the show in college 45 yrs ago,   I wouldn't even have dreamed of anything like this.

getting a UPD chief to apologize for flag that respects police??  just nuts
these kids don't pay the bills


https://www.breitbart.com/tech/2020/07/16/west-virginia-u-police-chief-faces-calls-for-firing-over-pro-police-flag-in-home/

DougMacG

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Re: Education
« Reply #438 on: July 16, 2020, 11:52:42 PM »

I don't recall students running the show in college 45 yrs ago,   I wouldn't even have dreamed of anything like this.
...

http://www.northrop.umn.edu/events/takeover-morrill-hall-1969

On January 14-15, 1969, approximately 70 Black students from the University of Minnesota took over Morrill Hall, the administration building housing the Office of the President

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_Minnesota
« Last Edit: July 17, 2020, 12:04:10 AM by DougMacG »

DougMacG

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Education, Summers off? How about fall, winter, spring?
« Reply #439 on: July 21, 2020, 07:53:26 AM »
Not Satisfied With Just Having Summers Off, Teachers Push For Fall, Winter, Spring too.   - Babylon Bee

https://babylonbee.com/news/not-satisfied-with-just-having-summers-off-teachers-push-for-fall-winter-spring/

Crafty_Dog

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ccp

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Re: Education
« Reply #442 on: July 27, 2020, 07:04:23 AM »
English grammar bad
Ebonics good

yeah right

AT this point the only thing Americans will have in common is our reliance on the State as well as being controlled by the State

with the AOCs of the Left telling us how to live with lawfare .



Crafty_Dog

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DougMacG

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Education closings, Zero examples of a teacher infected by a pupil
« Reply #444 on: July 28, 2020, 10:23:27 AM »
School closures ‘a mistake’ as no teachers infected in classroom
https://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/scotland/school-closures-a-mistake-as-no-teachers-infected-in-classroom-gpppq8r7k

The Times ^ | July 22 2020 | Mark McLaughlin,

Scientists are yet to find a single confirmed case of a teacher catching coronavirus from a pupil anywhere in the world, a leading epidemiologist has said. Mark Woolhouse, an infectious disease epidemiologist at Edinburgh University, offered reassurance to staff preparing for the full reopening of schools next month. Professor Woolhouse, a member of the UK government’s scientific advisory group, Sage, said that in hindsight closing schools in March was probably a mistake, but the limited role children play in spreading the virus only became clear further along the infection curve.

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/scotland/school-closures-a-mistake-as-no-teachers-infected-in-classroom-gpppq8r7k

Shut 'em down.  But don't say it was because of the virus.

Crafty_Dog

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Crafty_Dog

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WSJ: The Virus may strike Teacher Unions
« Reply #446 on: July 30, 2020, 04:55:58 AM »


The Virus May Strike Teachers Unions
What happens when they refuse to do their jobs and it turns out home-schoolers are better at it anyway?
By David R. Henderson
July 29, 2020 12:38 pm ET

If you have school-age children, you may be wondering if they’ll ever get an education. On Tuesday the American Federation of Teachers, the second-largest education union, threatened “safety strikes” if reopening plans aren’t to its liking. Some state and local governments are insisting that public K-12 schooling this fall be conducted online three to five days a week and imposing stringent conditions on those students who actually make it to the classroom.

Yet there are three reasons to be optimistic about the future of education. First, many parents will be more prepared to home-school their kids than they were in the spring. They or their hired teachers will do a better job of educating children, in many cases, than the public schools.

Second, once the pandemic ends, many parents, perhaps millions, will have a new appreciation of how mediocre a job the public schools were doing. They will continue home-schooling, switch to a private school, or push hard to end restrictions on the growth of charter schools. Third, as schools sit empty and homebound teachers draw their regular salaries for less effective work, there will be more opposition to more funding for public schools, which, in turn, will make local school boards amenable to lower-cost options such as charter schools.

Consider California. On July 17, Gov. Gavin Newsom decreed that neither government-run nor private schools may open in counties that have rising Covid-19 caseloads and hospitalizations. Like most governors who imposed lockdowns in March and April, he has completely abandoned the original “flatten the curve” rationale for lockdowns; the curve has flattened but the lockdowns remain. With current caseloads and hospitalization rates, 80% of California residents live in counties that won’t be allowed to open.

Even if the numbers allow them to open, teachers and staff members will have to distance themselves by at least 6 feet from each other and from children. Students in third grade and higher will be forced to wear masks. Even if Mr. Newsom backs down, school boards in Los Angeles and San Diego have already decided against in-person instruction for the start of the school year.

Public schools are dominant because they don’t need to compete for funds. Taxpayers are forced to finance them. If a family decides to take a child out of the local public school, thereby saving the school board the cost of educating that child, the family gets no tax break, no rebate. If a family finds a cheap private school that charges $8,000 in annual tuition, sending the child there makes economic sense only if the family values the private education by at least $8,000 more than they value the public education. That’s a high hurdle for most parents.

But with public schools’ shift to online instruction, the equation changes dramatically for two reasons. First, the public schools have done a poor job of adjusting to the new reality. Second, and possibly more important, online instruction eliminates arguably the most valuable service provided by public schools: child care. On net, therefore, the value of the online public school is much lower, especially for young children, than the value of in-person public school.

Many will opt instead to home-school. This summer, parents have had time to plan for the fall. Many of them are forming “learning pods,” which are small groups of families getting together to hire a teacher or a tutor to teach their kids.

What if, as I predict, home-schooling works, on average, better than the public schools before the pandemic? Once the pandemic ends, many parents will want to continue with home-schooling. A poll taken in May of 626 parents found 40.8% of them saying they were more likely than before the pandemic to enroll their child in “a home school, a neighborhood home-school co-op, or a virtual school” once the lockdowns ended. There are now about 56 million children in K-12 schools. Before the pandemic, an estimated two million children were home-schooled. If even a third of the 40.8% of parents who said they might take it up followed through, the number of home-schooled children would almost quadruple.

Even many who don’t home-school will push for an expansion of charter schools, which tend to be responsive to parents and can more easily fire poor teachers. The advantage for taxpayers is that charter schools cost, on average, thousands of dollars less than traditional public schools. Teachers unions won’t be in a strong position to object to a shift to lower-cost charters if they continue to object to the idea of teaching in person five days a week. The unions might even “settle” for charter schools over the dreaded home-school option.

Get ready. A school renaissance is coming.

Mr. Henderson is a research fellow at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution and editor of “The Concise Encyclopedia of Economics.”

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WSJ: One Room School Houses
« Reply #447 on: August 01, 2020, 06:01:08 PM »
In the olden days, one-room schoolhouses were common across the country, many of them simple wood-frame buildings painted white.

Katy Young’s one-room school is going be a dome.

Ms. Young, who lives in the suburbs outside Berkeley, Calif., recently set up a 24-foot-round geodesic polyhedron in her backyard to host a small group of kindergarteners. An Airstream trailer parked nearby will serve as an administrative office.


Pandemic schoolhouse

The dome was built by Ms. Young’s husband, Randy, for use at Burning Man, the annual outdoor art festival in the Nevada desert. But with Burning Man canceled this summer, the structure is being repurposed for her kindergarten son and five classmates, whose Mandarin-language school has switched to distance learning in the fall.

“We’re calling it ‘dome school,’ ” said Ms. Young, a lawyer.

With thousands of schools across the country moving to partial or full remote learning in the fall, parents are racing to form small at-home schooling groups or “pandemic pods,” groups of children who will be taught together. Some parents are hiring teachers to help guide the students through remote learning, while others plan to devise lesson plans on their own.

But finding a place to host the mini schools is proving to be a challenge. Even for parents that have the space, hosting students inside seems iffy because of social-distancing guidelines. Plus, many parents are working from home and don’t want the distraction.


For parents without the space or financial means for elaborate setups, the challenge can be even greater. Shauna Causey, founder and chief executive of Weekdays Micro-Schools, a website that helps organize schooling pods, says some families are retrofitting their dining rooms or basements, or taking over local parks.

Holding school outside comes with its own set of issues: What about Wi-Fi and bathroom access? Is there enough space for students to sit 6 feet apart? What happens when it rains?

Parents are devising workarounds. In Davis, Calif., Liam Honigsberg rolled out several Ikea benches and chairs, and erected a shade canopy at the end of a small side street for his 6-year-old son and his friends for the coming school year. Mr. Honigsberg said he suspects that setting up in the street is probably illegal.


As companies reopen offices and schools get ready for a new academic year, how can parents best prepare? Hear from The Wall Street Journal’s Work & Life columnist Rachel Feintzeig in conversation with reporters covering the current crisis. Join us for a discussion.
If it gets too cold in the winter, the class might end up in down jackets in his open garage.

“The spirit of American innovation is sort of the centerpiece of where I was going with this,” said Mr. Honigsberg, who works in education technology.

California Gov. Gavin Newsom recently mandated that most school districts across the state begin the academic year with full-time distance learning.

Sage Cohen, the mother of a sixth-grader in Portland, Ore., thought her recently renovated garage would make the perfect location for a home school. Portland Public Schools is planning a fall schedule that is largely remote, and she didn’t want her son to toil alone.

Ms. Cohen’s space has several windows that can be opened during the summer months and closed during the wet ones.

Then she stumbled onto a problem: she didn’t have anywhere for children to go to the bathroom. She is considering bringing in a port-a-potty or installing a compost toilet. “I’ve never done anything like this before,” she said.

In Renton, Wash., Lynzora Lowmax cleared her basement of her families’ belongings and converted it into a home-school pod for her young children and a couple of neighbors. “They’re not used to being down there, so when we go down, they know it’s time to get on schedule,” she said. Ms. Lomax plans to teach the class herself.


In cities, where extra space and backyards are scarce, parents are looking at renting empty storefronts and churches.

New York City schools are planning to open in the fall with only partial in-person instruction for more than one million students.

Josh Skyer, who owns commercial real estate in Brooklyn, is hoping to interest one or more home-school pods in renting a vacant store and condominium space he owns in the Cobble Hill neighborhood.

“I would get Wi-Fi, throw a flat-screen on the wall and build it out to be a luxury school house for the kids,” said Mr. Skyer.


Michelle Luxmore, a real-estate agent in Seattle, is finishing an 800-square-foot cottage in her backyard that she had planned to rent through the home-sharing platform Airbnb Inc.

Instead, she plans to turn it into a school for her 6-year-old and his classmates, and wants to help other parents build similar structures in their yards. Seattle’s regulations recently changed to allow for such structures up to 1,000 square feet, but a permit is required.

“Some people that I talk to are like, ‘Really? Why would I do that?’ and I’m like, ‘Hear me out,’ ” Ms. Luxmore said.

Seattle Public Schools is planning to hold school remotely in the fall.

Ms. Young, who erected the dome, said she already is anticipating some of her neighbors complaining, as they did when she parked her Airstream in the yard. “We’re going to ask for forgiveness rather than permission,” she said.

Like many other parents, Ms. Young was stressed about what to do with her son after his school announced recently it would go fully remote.

Then Mr. Young remembered the collapsible dome he had spent about three months building for Burning Man, which typically takes place each August.


Randy Young built the dome to use at the Burning Man festival in Nevada.
PHOTO: KATY YOUNG
Made of old parachute material and aluminum piping, the dome will withstand light drizzle, but if it rains hard, the couple plans to throw some tarps on top or move the whole structure indoors. Inside of it, they plan to set up tables, workstations and portable heaters for the winter months.

It took the Youngs about three hours to set it up in the yard. Mr. Young carved a “Dome School” sign to hang out front.

“I am super happy to reuse it now,” he said.

Write to Kirsten Grind at kirsten.grind@wsj.com