Author Topic: The American Creed: Our Founding Fathers:  (Read 692292 times)

Crafty_Dog

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Samuel Adams, Freedom of Religion 1772
« Reply #1600 on: February 24, 2015, 09:20:40 AM »
"As neither reason requires, nor religion permits the contrary, every man living in or out of a state of civil society, has a right peaceably and quietly to worship God according to the dictates of his conscience." --Samuel Adams, A State of the Rights of the Colonists, 1772

Crafty_Dog

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Re: The American Creed: Our Founding Fathers:
« Reply #1601 on: February 25, 2015, 08:34:56 AM »
"A question arises whether all the powers of government, legislative, executive, and judicial, shall be left in this body? I think a people cannot be long free, nor ever happy, whose government is in one assembly." --John Adams, Thoughts On Government, 1776

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Washibngton, Farewell Address, Separation of Powers 1796
« Reply #1602 on: March 05, 2015, 06:22:20 AM »
"The necessity of reciprocal checks in the exercise of political power, by dividing and distributing it into different depositories, and constituting each the guardian of the public weal against invasions by the others, has been evinced by experiments ancient and modern, some of them in our country and under our own eyes." --George Washington, Farewell Address, 1796

Crafty_Dog

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Hamilton: 1787, Federalist #1
« Reply #1603 on: March 06, 2015, 05:36:11 AM »
"Of those men who have overturned the liberties of republics, the greatest number have begun their career by paying an obsequious court to the people, commencing demagogues and ending tyrants." --Alexander Hamilton in Federalist No. 1 (1787)

Crafty_Dog

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Story, 1833
« Reply #1604 on: March 11, 2015, 09:15:21 AM »
"Without justice being freely, fully, and impartially administered, neither our persons, nor our rights, nor our property, can be protected. And if these, or either of them, are regulated by no certain laws, and are subject to no certain principles, and are held by no certain tenure, and are redressed, when violated, by no certain remedies, society fails of all its value; and men may as well return to a state of savage and barbarous independence." --Joseph Story, Commentaries on the Constitution, 1833

Crafty_Dog

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Jefferson on the Judiciary, 1821
« Reply #1605 on: March 12, 2015, 06:26:54 PM »
"The germ of dissolution of our federal government is in the constitution of the federal judiciary; an irresponsible body, (for impeachment is scarcely a scare-crow) working like gravity by night and by day, gaining a little today and a little tomorrow, and advancing its noiseless step like a thief, over the field of jurisdiction, until all shall be usurped from the States, and the government of all be consolidated into one." --Thomas Jefferson, Letter to Charles Hammond, 1821

Crafty_Dog

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Re: The American Creed: Our Founding Fathers:
« Reply #1606 on: March 13, 2015, 10:22:25 AM »
"When men exercise their reason coolly and freely, on a variety of distinct questions, they inevitably fall into different opinions, on some of them. When they are governed by a common passion, their opinions if they are so to be called, will be the same." --James Madison, Federalist No. 50, 1788

Crafty_Dog

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Madison: Reason and Passion
« Reply #1607 on: March 17, 2015, 10:59:21 AM »
"When men exercise their reason coolly and freely, on a variety of distinct questions, they inevitably fall into different opinions, on some of them. When they are governed by a common passion, their opinions if they are so to be called, will be the same." --James Madison, Federalist No. 50, 1788

Crafty_Dog

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Ben Franklin on Obama
« Reply #1608 on: March 18, 2015, 02:07:02 PM »
“He that falls in love with himself will have no rivals.” --Benjamin Franklin (1758)

Crafty_Dog

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Jefferson: Mobs are cankerous sores
« Reply #1609 on: March 20, 2015, 10:58:34 AM »

"The mobs of the great cities add just so much to the support of pure
government as sores do to the strength of the human body. It is the manners
and spirit of a people which preserve a republic in vigor. A degeneracy in
these is a canker which soon eats to the heart of its laws and constitution."
--Thomas Jefferson, Notes on Virginia, Query XIX, 1782

DougMacG

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On this day in 1775, "Give me liberty or give me death!" Patrick Henry
« Reply #1610 on: March 23, 2015, 07:28:15 PM »
On this day in 1775, 240 years ago, Patrick Henry gave his powerful "Give me liberty or give me death!" speech. In Colonial Williamsburg.
http://www.history.org/almanack/life/politics/giveme.cfm
« Last Edit: March 24, 2015, 09:03:39 AM by Crafty_Dog »

Crafty_Dog

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Washington Farewell Address: Sense of religious obligation is indespensable
« Reply #1611 on: March 24, 2015, 09:04:43 AM »
"Where is the security for property, for reputation, for life, if the sense of
religious obligation desert the oaths which are the instruments of
investigation in courts of justice?" --George Washington, Farewell Address,
1796

Crafty_Dog

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John Adams: Property, Marriage 1814
« Reply #1612 on: March 25, 2015, 02:38:22 PM »

"As long as property exists, it will accumulate in individuals and families.
As long as marriage exists, knowledge, property and influence will accumulate
in families." --John Adams, letter to Thomas Jefferson, 1814

Crafty_Dog

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John Adams on the Militia
« Reply #1613 on: April 07, 2015, 10:15:19 AM »
"The fundamental law of the militia is, that it be created, directed and commanded by the laws, and ever for the support of the laws." --John Adams, A Defense of the Constitutions of Government of the United States of America, 1787

Crafty_Dog

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Washington; Paine
« Reply #1614 on: April 08, 2015, 10:32:02 AM »
"At this auspicious period, the United States came into existence as a nation; and if their citizens should not be completely free and happy, the fault will be entirely their own." --George Washington, Letter to the Governors, 1783

"Those who expect to reap the blessings of freedom, must, like men, undergo the fatigues of supporting it." --Thomas Paine

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Story, 1833
« Reply #1615 on: April 13, 2015, 09:36:17 AM »
"Republics are created by the virtue, public spirit, and intelligence of the citizens. They fall, when the wise are banished from the public councils, because they dare to be honest, and the profligate are rewarded, because they flatter the people, in order to betray them." --Joseph Story, Commentaries on the Constitution, 1833

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Jefferson on taxes, 1784
« Reply #1616 on: April 15, 2015, 06:25:18 PM »
"Would it not be better to simplify the system of taxation rather than to spread it over such a variety of subjects and pass through so many new hands." —Thomas Jefferson, letter to James Madison, 1784

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Jefferson channels Washington, 1785
« Reply #1617 on: April 21, 2015, 09:49:10 AM »
"It is of great importance to set a resolution, not to be shaken, never to tell an untruth. There is no vice so mean, so pitiful, so contemptible; and he who permits himself to tell a lie once, finds it much easier to do it a second and a third time, till at length it becomes habitual; he tells lies without attending to it, and truths without the world's believing him." —Thomas Jefferson, letter to Peter Carr, 1785

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Samuel Adams on Virtue, 1775.
« Reply #1618 on: April 22, 2015, 06:57:52 PM »
"We may look up to armies for defense, but virtue is our best security. It is not possible that any state should long remain free, where virtue is not supremely honored." —Samuel Adams, Letter to Joseph Warren, 1775

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John Adams to his wife 1800
« Reply #1619 on: May 08, 2015, 10:20:42 AM »
"I pray heaven to bestow the best of blessing on this house, and on all that shall hereafter inhabit it. May none but honest and wise men ever rule under this roof!" —John Adams, letter to his wife Abigail, 1800

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Madison: No man to judge his own cause
« Reply #1620 on: May 13, 2015, 10:16:22 AM »
"No man is allowed to be a judge in his own cause, because his interest would certainly bias his judgment, and, not improbably, corrupt his integrity." —James Madison, Federalist No. 10, 1787

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Washington: Citizen Soldier 1775.
« Reply #1621 on: May 13, 2015, 08:30:32 PM »
Armed Forces Day 2015
Honoring American Patriots
By Mark Alexander • May 13, 2015     
"When we assumed the Soldier, we did not lay aside the Citizen; and we shall most sincerely rejoice with you in the happy hour when the establishment of American Liberty, upon the most firm and solid foundations shall enable us to return to our Private Stations in the bosom of a free, peacefully and happy Country." —George Washington (1775)

Crafty_Dog

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Story, 1833
« Reply #1622 on: May 20, 2015, 10:00:33 AM »
"Men, to act with vigor and effect, must have time to mature measures, and judgment and experience, as to the best method of applying them. They must not be hurried on to their conclusions by the passions, or the fears of the multitude. They must deliberate, as well as resolve." —Joseph Story, Commentaries on the Constitution, 1833

Crafty_Dog

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John Adams on Happiness 1776
« Reply #1623 on: May 26, 2015, 08:38:55 AM »
"[A]ll speculative politicians will agree, that the happiness of society is the end of government, as all divines and moral philosophers will agree that the happiness of the individual is the end of man. From this principle it will follow that the form of government which communicates ease, comfort, security, or, in one word, happiness, to the greatest numbers of persons, and in the greatest degree, is the best." —John Adams, Thoughts on Government, 1776

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Washington: Peace through Strength
« Reply #1624 on: May 28, 2015, 08:32:08 AM »
"There is a rank due to the United States, among nations, which will be withheld, if not absolutely lost, by the reputation of weakness. If we desire to avoid insult, we must be able to repel it; if we desire to secure peace ... it must be known that we are at all times ready for war." —George Washington (1793)

Crafty_Dog

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“The mobs of the great cities add just so much to the support of pure government as sores do to the strength of the human body. It is the manners and spirit of a people, which preserve a republic in vigor. A degeneracy in these is a canker which soon eats to the heart of its laws and constitution.” —Thomas Jefferson (1787)

"In disquisitions of every kind there are certain primary truths, or first principles, upon which all subsequent reasoning must depend." —Alexander Hamilton, Federalist No. 31, 1788
« Last Edit: June 03, 2015, 12:48:26 PM by Crafty_Dog »

Crafty_Dog

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Madison: The general interest vs. the special interests
« Reply #1626 on: June 04, 2015, 12:24:06 PM »
"But the mild voice of reason, pleading the cause of an enlarged and permanent interest, is but too often drowned, before public bodies as well as individuals, by the clamors of an impatient avidity for immediate and immoderate gain." —James Madison, Federalist No. 42, 1788

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Madison on Separation of Powers, 1788
« Reply #1627 on: June 11, 2015, 08:30:47 AM »
"The accumulation of all powers, legislative, executive, and judiciary, in the same hands, whether of one, a few, or many, and whether hereditary, self-appointed, or elective, may justly be pronounced the very definition of tyranny." —James Madison, Federalist No. 47, 1788

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John Marshall on Marriage, 1823
« Reply #1628 on: June 26, 2015, 09:51:02 AM »
"All know and feel ... the sacredness of the connection between husband and wife. All know that the sweetness of social intercourse, the harmony of society, the happiness of families, depend on that mutual partiality which they feel, or that delicate forbearance which they manifest towards each other." —John Marshall, Sexton v. Wheaton, 1823

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Hamilton, Federalist 34, 1788
« Reply #1629 on: June 30, 2015, 10:03:08 AM »
"Constitutions of civil government are not to be framed upon a calculation of existing exigencies, but upon a combination of these with the probable exigencies of ages, according to the natural and tried course of human affairs." —Alexander Hamilton, Federalist No. 34, 1788

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Wilson, 1791 on Judges
« Reply #1630 on: July 02, 2015, 08:16:27 PM »
"Every prudent and cautious judge ... will remember, that his duty and his business is, not to make the law, but to interpret and apply it." —James Wilson, Lectures on Law, 1791

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John Adams: The meaning of the American Revolution 1813
« Reply #1631 on: July 03, 2015, 09:02:01 AM »
"But what do we mean by the American Revolution? Do we mean the American war? The Revolution was effected before the war commenced. The Revolution was in the minds and hearts of the people; a change in their religious sentiments, of their duties and obligations. ... This radical change in the principles, opinions, sentiments, and affections of the people was the real American Revolution." —John Adams (1813)

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Jefferson 1816; the proper limits of power
« Reply #1632 on: July 07, 2015, 03:03:07 PM »
"Our legislators are not sufficiently apprized of the rightful limits of their power; that their true office is to declare and enforce only our natural rights and duties, and to take none of them from us." —Thomas Jefferson, Letter to Francis W. Gilmer, 1816

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Re: The American Creed: Our Founding Fathers:
« Reply #1633 on: July 08, 2015, 10:19:56 AM »
"History affords us many instances of the ruin of states, by the prosecution of measures ill suited to the temper and genius of their people." —Benjamin Franklin, Emblematical Representations, 1774

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S. Williams on Marriage 1794
« Reply #1634 on: July 08, 2015, 12:01:15 PM »
second post of the day

"Every thing useful and beneficial to man, seems to be connected with obedience to the laws of his nature, the inclinations, the duties, and the happiness of individuals, resolve themselves into customs and habits, favourable, in the highest degree, to society. In no case is this more apparent, than in the customs of nations respecting marriage." --Samuel Williams (1794)

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Re: The American Creed: Our Founding Fathers:
« Reply #1635 on: July 16, 2015, 01:26:53 PM »
"If virtue and knowledge are diffused among the people, they will never be
enslaved. This will be their great security." —Samuel Adams, letter to James
Warren, 1779

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Witherspoon
« Reply #1636 on: July 17, 2015, 01:38:08 PM »


"Nothing is more certain than that a general profligacy and corruption of
manners make a people ripe for destruction. A good form of government may hold
the rotten materials together for some time, but beyond a certain pitch, even
the best constitution will be ineffectual, and slavery must ensue." —John
Witherspoon, The Dominion of Providence Over the Passions of Men, 1776

Crafty_Dog

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Jefferson 1782
« Reply #1637 on: July 22, 2015, 09:07:55 AM »
"We lay it down as a fundamental, that laws, to be just, must give a reciprocation of right; that, without this, they are mere arbitrary rules of conduct, founded in force, and not in conscience" —Thomas Jefferson, Notes on the state of Virginia, 1782

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Jefferson: If the poeple become inattentive 1787
« Reply #1638 on: July 27, 2015, 10:43:32 AM »
"If [the People] become inattentive to the public affairs, you and I, and Congress, and Assemblies, Judges, and Governors, shall all become wolves." —Thomas Jefferson, letter to Edward Carrington, 1787

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Washington, Farewewll Address
« Reply #1639 on: July 28, 2015, 09:45:17 AM »
"In proportion as the structure of a government gives force to public opinion, it is essential that public opinion should be enlightened." —George Washington, Farewell Address, 1796

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Washington, 1796
« Reply #1640 on: July 29, 2015, 01:01:52 PM »
"Guard against the impostures of pretended patriotism." —George Washington (1796)

Crafty_Dog

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James Monroe on the preservation of rights over time, 1788
« Reply #1641 on: July 31, 2015, 09:00:13 AM »
"How prone all human institutions have been to decay; how subject the best-formed and most wisely organized governments have been to lose their check and totally dissolve; how difficult it has been for mankind, in all ages and countries, to preserve their dearest rights and best privileges, impelled as it were by an irresistible fate of despotism." —James Monroe, speech in the Virginia Ratifying Convention, 1788

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Washington Farewell Address 1796
« Reply #1642 on: August 05, 2015, 09:04:29 AM »
"The spirit of encroachment tends to consolidate the powers of all the departments in one, and thus to create whatever the form of government, a real despotism." —George Washington, Farewell Address, 1796

Crafty_Dog

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Washington, first Inaugural 1789
« Reply #1643 on: August 06, 2015, 10:49:54 AM »
"The foundations of our national policy will be laid in the pure and immutable principles of private morality, and the preeminence of free government be exemplified by all the attributes which can win the affections of its citizens, and command the respect of the world." —George Washington, First Inaugural Address, 1789

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John Adams on Virtue in 1776
« Reply #1644 on: August 10, 2015, 12:05:05 PM »
"Public virtue cannot exist in a nation without private, and public virtue is the only foundation of republics. There must be a positive passion for the public good, the public interest, honor, power and glory, established in the minds of the people, or there can be no republican government, nor any real liberty: and this public passion must be superior to all private passions." —John Adams, letter to Mercy Warren, 1776

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Fisher Ames on licentiousness and liberty
« Reply #1645 on: August 12, 2015, 09:24:34 AM »
"The known propensity of a democracy is to licentiousness which the ambitious call, and ignorant believe to be liberty." —Fisher Ames, speech in the Massachusetts Ratifying Convention, 1788

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Jefferson on the Judiciary, 1823
« Reply #1646 on: August 13, 2015, 09:31:21 AM »
"At the establishment of our constitutions, the judiciary bodies were supposed to be the most helpless and harmless members of the government. Experience, however, soon showed in what way they were to become the most dangerous." —Thomas Jefferson, letter to Monsieur A. Coray, 1823

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Washington, first Inaugural draft 1789
« Reply #1647 on: August 14, 2015, 12:06:09 PM »
"No compact among men ... can be pronounced everlasting and inviolable, and if I may so express myself, that no wall of words, that no mound of parchment can be so formed as to stand against the sweeping torrent of boundless ambition on the one side, aided by the sapping current of corrupted morals on the other." —George Washington, draft of first Inaugural Address, 1789

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John Adams: Thoughts on Govt. 1776
« Reply #1648 on: August 19, 2015, 09:27:37 AM »
"Government is instituted for the common good; for the protection, safety, prosperity, and happiness of the people; and not for profit, honor, or private interest of any one man, family, or class of men." —John Adams, Thoughts on Government, 1776

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Joseph Warren after the Battle of Lexington
« Reply #1649 on: August 28, 2015, 01:18:39 PM »
"Nevertheless, to the persecution and tyranny of his cruel ministry we will not tamely submit — appealing to Heaven for the justice of our cause, we determine to die or be free." —Joseph Warren, American account of the Battle of Lexington, 1775