Author Topic: The American Creed: Our Founding Fathers:  (Read 698123 times)


Crafty_Dog

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Madison on rent seekers 1788
« Reply #1701 on: July 02, 2019, 09:45:41 AM »
second post of the day

"Every new regulation concerning commerce or revenue, or in any way affecting the value of the different species of property, presents a new harvest to those who watch the change, and can trace its consequences; a harvest, reared not by themselves, but by the toils and cares of the great body of their fellow-citizens. This is a state of things in which it may be said with some truth that laws are made for the FEW, not for the MANY." —James Madison (1788)


Crafty_Dog

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Jefferson: The artillery of the press
« Reply #1703 on: July 10, 2019, 04:22:59 PM »
"During the course of administration, and in order to disturb it, the artillery of the press has been levelled against us, charged with whatsoever its licentiousness could devise or dare. These abuses of an institution so important to freedom and science are deeply to be regretted, inasmuch as they tend to lessen its usefulness and to sap its safety." —Thomas Jefferson (1805)

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George Washington
« Reply #1705 on: July 16, 2019, 12:57:22 PM »


"No Wall of words ... can be so formed as to stand against the sweeping torrent of boundless ambition on the one side, aided by the sapping current of corrupted morals on the other." —George Washington (1789)

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Patrick Henry
« Reply #1706 on: July 29, 2019, 10:20:49 AM »


"We are apt to shut our eyes against a painful truth — and listen to the song of that syren, till she transforms us into beasts." —Patrick Henry (1775)

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Jefferson 1823 Constitutional construction
« Reply #1707 on: July 31, 2019, 11:56:14 AM »


"On every question of construction carry ourselves back to the time when the Constitution was adopted, recollect the spirit manifested in the debates and instead of trying what meaning may be squeezed out of the text or invented against it, conform to the probable one in which it was passed." —Thomas Jefferson (1823)

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WSJ: John Locke breaks his silence
« Reply #1708 on: August 30, 2019, 08:45:49 PM »
 

John Locke Breaks His Silence
A new manuscript is located in Maryland. But do Americans care what the philosopher has to say?
By Jason Willick
Aug. 30, 2019 5:44 pm ET

John Locke has a new article out, although he died in 1704. When England’s King Charles II discovered a failed 1683 assassination plot against himself and his brother, he beheaded the plotters and started arresting opponents. Among the targets was Locke, who knew some of the conspirators but likely wasn’t involved. Fearing for his life, Locke fled to the Netherlands. Before leaving, he deposited several manuscripts with Edward Clarke, a member of Parliament and trusted friend.

One of those manuscripts has only now been discovered—in the Annapolis, Md., library of St. John’s College. This month it was published for the first time, in the Cambridge Historical Journal, by independent scholar J.C. Walmsley and Cambridge University fellow Felix Waldmann.

The title of the work, written in 1667 or 1668, is “Reasons for Tolerateing Papists Equally with Others.” Mr. Walmsley tells me that when he came across the title in a 1928 book catalog, it seemed “very unlikely that this was actually a real thing that Locke had actually written.” In one of Locke’s most famous works—the 1689 “Letter Concerning Toleration,” which helped shape the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution—he had taken a liberal view of religious tolerance for Protestant sects persecuted by the Anglican Church, but excluded Catholics and atheists.

Mr. Walmsley’s research revealed that there was a single manuscript with the title “Reasons for Tolerateing Papists Equally With Others” in the St. John’s collection. Librarians there sent him an electronic copy, and he immediately recognized Locke’s handwriting. He plugged the text into search engines and found that no one had ever quoted or printed it before. He flew to Maryland to examine it in person.

John Locke (1632-1704). Photo: Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Messrs. Walmsley and Waldmann found that the manuscript likely remained in the hands of Edward Clarke’s descendants until 1922, when it “was consigned to Sotheby’s . ” It changed hands several times, they report, before a New Yorker named Henry MacDonald presented it to St. John’s “at a time we cannot determine.”

Why St. John’s? The scholars can only speculate. Mr. Waldmann thinks it may have to do with Maryland’s founding by Lord Baltimore as a haven for persecuted Catholics. The manuscript shows Locke weighing the question of toleration for Catholics with more solicitude than in any of his other writings. He considers whether “Papists can be supposd to be as good subjects as others” and wrote that “If abilitys alone ought to prefer men to imployment”—that is, under a meritocracy—“Papists are to be tolerated.” This was a radical sentiment in England at the time.

In the piece’s lengthier second part, Locke arrives at his well-known position that toleration of Catholics is impossible. The reason, he suggests, isn’t religious but political: It “is not the difference of their opinion in religion, or of their ceremonys in worship,” that justifies persecution of Catholics, Locke writes, “but their dangerous & factious tenents in reference to the state.” Locke feared that Catholics’ “subjection to a forraigne infallible power”—the pope—meant they could not be loyal to the British government.

Locke was not an “abstracted philosopher contemplating at a distance from political events,” Mr. Waldmann says. He was an active player in the religious and political controversies of the British Restoration. His philosophy evolved against the backdrop of religious wars in Britain and across Europe after the Protestant Reformation. He had seen the bloodshed that followed when the state concerned itself not only with protecting citizens’ life, liberty and property but also with the salvation of their souls.

The American Founders took Locke’s views to heart. They banned the establishment of a national church, though that was the norm in Europe. They drew even more heavily on Locke’s “Second Treatise of Government,” which Thomas Jefferson paraphrased at length in the Declaration of Independence. Yet today Locke seems to be falling out of fashion. Progressives have lost much of their interest in the Western canon; for some of them, the most significant thing about Locke is that he had a financial interest in the slave trade.

Conservatives are also turning against Locke. Two acclaimed 2018 books—“Why Liberalism Failed” by Patrick Deneen and “The Virtue of Nationalism” by Yoram Hazony —assail Locke at length for being too disconnected from tradition and too focused on individual autonomy.

Claire Arcenas, a historian at the University of Montana, tells me Locke’s American interpreters have appealed to him for different purposes in different contexts. Locke wrote before the rise of modern capitalism, but some in the early 20th century presented Locke “as a kind of proto-socialist” because of his writings on labor. In the Cold War, conservatives emphasized Locke’s “commitments to private property” as evidence of his “proto-capitalist” views. In 2014, historian Michael Lind argued that 21st century Western populists are drawing without knowing it on Locke’s idea of popular sovereignty. Ms. Arcenas says “to think about who Locke is right now is probably different than who Locke was five years ago and who he will be in five years.”

It’s an indicator of how far Locke has faded from view that the discovery of an original Locke manuscript has so far gone without mention in the major press. “Imagine if you had the standard edition of Shakespeare ’s ‘Hamlet,’ ” Mr. Waldmann says, “and then Craig [Walmsley] goes out and finds a lost act to the play.” One reason for the quiet reception is that the free-market right that embraced Locke in the 20th century is beleaguered, and the leftward drift of mainstream culture has made critiques of Western society more prestigious than efforts to understand its foundations.

The manuscript’s journey from England to the U.S. 250 years after its composition, Mr. Waldmann says, is “symbolic of Locke’s reception in that era in the 20th century.” He was a giant of American liberal democracy standing against totalitarian rivals. Today he is metaphorically in exile. His literal exile from England lasted only six years—in 1689, after the Glorious Revolution, he returned to England on the same boat as Queen Mary. Perhaps this discovery of a piece of his thought heralds a similarly swift return in the American imagination.

Mr. Willick is an assistant editorial features editor at the Journal.

Crafty_Dog

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Webster, 1787: Armed People
« Reply #1709 on: September 03, 2019, 09:40:45 AM »
"Before a standing army can rule, the people must be disarmed; as they are in almost every kingdom of Europe." —Noah Webster (1787)

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Thomas Paine
« Reply #1710 on: September 12, 2019, 09:11:39 PM »
"When we are planning for posterity, we ought to remember that virtue is not hereditary." —Thomas Paine (1776)

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Mason on British thought to disarm Americans
« Reply #1712 on: September 25, 2019, 12:10:57 PM »
"When the resolution of enslaving America was formed in Great Britain, the British Parliament was advised ... to disarm the people; that it was the best and most effectual way to enslave them; but that they should not do it openly, but weaken them, and let them sink gradually." —George Mason (1788)

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1808 Jefferson on encountering hostility
« Reply #1713 on: October 24, 2019, 09:39:24 AM »
"I suppose, indeed, that in public life, a man whose political principles have any decided character and who has energy enough to give them effect must always expect to encounter political hostility from those of adverse principles." —Thomas Jefferson (1808)

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Re: The American Creed: Our Founding Fathers:
« Reply #1714 on: October 24, 2019, 11:00:26 AM »
""I suppose, indeed, that in public life, a man whose political principles have any decided character and who has energy enough to give them effect must always expect to encounter political hostility from those of adverse principles." —Thomas Jefferson (1808)"

Yes , and somehow I suspect he did not include adding in the next sentence that one should call those dissenters "human scum"
(at least in public)

 :wink:

Crafty_Dog

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Re: The American Creed: Our Founding Fathers:
« Reply #1715 on: October 24, 2019, 12:15:43 PM »
I know, I know, , , I really wish he would outgrow that sort of thing , , ,

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Thomas Paine 1776 on Virtue
« Reply #1716 on: November 08, 2019, 08:57:27 AM »
"When we are planning for posterity, we ought to remember that virtue is not hereditary." —Thomas Paine (1776)




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Madison: Ambition 1788
« Reply #1720 on: December 09, 2019, 11:07:26 AM »
"Ambition must be made to counteract ambition. The interest of the man must be connected with the constitutional rights of the place. It may be a reflection on human nature that such devices should be necessary to control the abuses of government. What is government itself but the greatest of all reflections on human nature?" —James Madison (1788)

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Re: The American Creed: Our Founding Fathers: Ben Franklin, taxes, suppression
« Reply #1721 on: January 29, 2020, 08:08:30 AM »
"The more the people are discontented with the oppression of taxes, the greater the need the prince has of money to distribute among his partisans and pay the troops that are to suppress all resistance and enable him to plunder at pleasure."
https://fee.org/articles/17-benjamin-franklin-quotes-on-tyranny-liberty-and-rights/

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Washington 1790
« Reply #1723 on: March 03, 2020, 12:11:23 PM »
"All see, and most admire, the glare which hovers round the external trappings of elevated office. To me there is nothing in it, beyond the lustre which may be reflected from its connection with a power of promoting human felicity." —George Washington (1790)

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Jefferson: 1801
« Reply #1724 on: March 05, 2020, 09:00:28 PM »
"The Constitution on which our Union rests, shall be administered by me [as President] according to the safe and honest meaning contemplated by the plain understanding of the people of the United States at the time of its adoption — a meaning to be found in the explanations of those who advocated, not those who opposed it, and who opposed it merely lest the construction should be applied which they denounced as possible." —Thomas Jefferson (1801)

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Hamilton 1788
« Reply #1725 on: March 17, 2020, 10:55:37 AM »
"It is an unquestionable truth, that the body of the people in every country desire sincerely its prosperity. But it is equally unquestionable that they do not possess the discernment and stability necessary for systematic government. To deny that they are frequently led into the grossest of errors, by misinformation and passion, would be a flattery which their own good sense must despise." —Alexander Hamilton (1788)

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Washington 1789
« Reply #1726 on: March 25, 2020, 09:21:26 AM »
"No compact among men ... can be pronounced everlasting and inviolable, and if I may so express myself, that no Wall of words, that no mound of parchment can be so formed as to stand against the sweeping torrent of boundless ambition on the one side, aided by the sapping current of corrupted morals on the other." —George Washington (1789)

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Samuel Adams 1772 Natural Law
« Reply #1727 on: April 28, 2020, 04:03:37 PM »
"If men through fear, fraud or mistake, should in terms renounce and give up any essential natural right, the eternal law of reason and the great end of society, would absolutely vacate such renunciation; the right to freedom being the gift of God Almighty, it is not in the power of Man to alienate this gift, and voluntarily become a slave." —Samuel Adams (1772)


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Madison 1822
« Reply #1729 on: May 12, 2020, 05:44:07 PM »
"A popular Government, without popular information, or the means of acquiring it, is but a Prologue to a Farce or a Tragedy; or, perhaps both. Knowledge will forever govern ignorance: And a people who mean to be their own Governors, must arm themselves with the power which knowledge gives." —James Madison (1822)

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Story 1833
« Reply #1730 on: May 15, 2020, 12:49:42 PM »
"Republics are created by the virtue, public spirit, and intelligence of the citizens. They fall, when the wise are banished from the public councils, because they dare to be honest, and the profligate are rewarded, because they flatter the people, in order to betray them." —Joseph Story (1833)


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Patrick Henry 1775
« Reply #1732 on: May 27, 2020, 05:46:45 PM »
"Are we disposed to be of the number of those, who having eyes, see not, and having ears, hear not, the things which so nearly concern their temporal salvation? For my part, whatever anguish of spirit it might cost, I am willing to know the whole truth; to know the worst, and to provide for it." —Patrick Henry (1775)

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Jefferson, 1816
« Reply #1733 on: May 29, 2020, 11:19:56 AM »
"The most sacred of the duties of a government [is] to do equal and impartial justice to all citizens." —Thomas Jefferson (1816)

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as seen on Mark Levin (1619 Project)
« Reply #1734 on: June 08, 2020, 02:58:50 PM »
the Woodson center:

ttps://woodsoncenter.org/2020/02/13/whites-worst-blacks-best-1619-project-ny-times-1776-facts

thinking of donating
« Last Edit: June 09, 2020, 09:21:50 AM by Crafty_Dog »

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Fisher Ames on Freedom of the Press
« Reply #1735 on: July 07, 2020, 09:58:52 AM »
"We are, heart and soul, friends to the freedom of the press. It is however, the prostituted companion of liberty, and somehow or other, we know not how, its efficient auxiliary." —Fisher Ames (1807)

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John Adams 1776 Virtue is the Foundation
« Reply #1736 on: July 27, 2020, 09:43:52 AM »
"The only foundation of a free Constitution, is pure Virtue, and if this cannot be inspired into our People, in a greater Measure than they have it now, they may change their Rulers, and the forms of Government, but they will not obtain a lasting Liberty." —John Adams (1776)

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Benjamin Rush 1788 Law and Liberty
« Reply #1737 on: July 28, 2020, 11:01:02 AM »
"Where there is no law, there is no liberty; and nothing deserves the name of law but that which is certain and universal in its operation upon all the members of the community." —Benjamin Rush (1788)

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Madison 1787
« Reply #1738 on: July 30, 2020, 09:31:23 AM »
"The great desideratum in Government is, so to modify the sovereignty as that it may be sufficiently neutral between different parts of the Society to controul one part from invading the rights of another, and at the same time sufficiently controuled itself, from setting up an interest adverse to that of the entire Society." —James Madison (1787)

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Jefferson cranky with the press
« Reply #1739 on: September 23, 2020, 09:17:32 AM »
"During the course of administration, and in order to disturb it, the artillery of the press has been levelled against us, charged with whatsoever its licentiousness could devise or dare. These abuses of an institution so important to freedom and science are deeply to be regretted, inasmuch as they tend to lessen its usefulness and to sap its safety." —Thomas Jefferson (1805)

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Jefferson restraining judges 1825
« Reply #1740 on: September 28, 2020, 11:30:14 AM »
"One single object ... [will merit] the endless gratitude of the society: that of restraining the judges from usurping legislation." —Thomas Jefferson (1825)