Author Topic: Crime and Punishment  (Read 96086 times)

G M

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Crafty_Dog

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Re: Crime and Punishment
« Reply #151 on: March 13, 2018, 05:31:05 PM »
Heh heh.

DDF

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Re: Crime and Punishment
« Reply #152 on: March 17, 2018, 08:44:34 PM »
Great work GM. Very interesting.

Crafty_Dog

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G M

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Re: Bail, and Bail Bondsmen
« Reply #154 on: April 02, 2018, 05:51:42 AM »


https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/31/us/bail-bonds-extortion.html?nl=top-stories&nlid=49641193ries&ref=cta

And then they will push bail bonds companies out of business. Coming soon, a NY Times expose on how poor defendants can’t get bail.

Crafty_Dog

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G M

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DougMacG

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Re: Separate prison for illegal aliens
« Reply #159 on: March 15, 2019, 09:25:03 AM »


https://www.newyorker.com/news/daily-comment/a-new-study-uncovers-troubling-information-about-immigrant-only-prisons?utm_campaign=aud-dev&utm_source=nl&utm_brand=tny&utm_mailing=TNY_Daily_031319&utm_medium=email&bxid=5be9d3fa3f92a40469e2d85c&user_id=50142053&esrc=&utm_term=TNY_Daily

Instead of investing in better health care and better treatment for illegals, how about we try to keep them out.

New Yorker: An epileptic illegal died in custody without getting needed medicine.  What is learned from a tragic human story?  We should have fully stocked pharmacies at the border?  Did he have medication when he arrived and we took it from him?  He should have immediate high quality healthcare for free awaiting his arrival just for crossing illegally?  That won't lure people in.  What was he in prison for?  Did he communicate his medical need before the seizure?  In what language?  Do we need interpreters awaiting the illegals crossers too?  Would he have died if was in his country?  Would have an American have died in the same situation? 

The more we send free [stuff] to the illegals including healthcare, food, clothing, housing, transportation, all the essentials of life, the more illegals will come.  If a man brings a purchased, trafficked, hostage underage girl with him that he has raped, we welcome them as a family?  What is wrong with this escalating cycle? 

The way to have fewer treatment issues of illegals is to have fewer illegals coming in.

G M

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Re: Separate prison for illegal aliens
« Reply #160 on: March 15, 2019, 02:44:37 PM »
Yeah, but the dems can't vote-farm them if they aren't here.



https://www.newyorker.com/news/daily-comment/a-new-study-uncovers-troubling-information-about-immigrant-only-prisons?utm_campaign=aud-dev&utm_source=nl&utm_brand=tny&utm_mailing=TNY_Daily_031319&utm_medium=email&bxid=5be9d3fa3f92a40469e2d85c&user_id=50142053&esrc=&utm_term=TNY_Daily

Instead of investing in better health care and better treatment for illegals, how about we try to keep them out.

New Yorker: An epileptic illegal died in custody without getting needed medicine.  What is learned from a tragic human story?  We should have fully stocked pharmacies at the border?  Did he have medication when he arrived and we took it from him?  He should have immediate high quality healthcare for free awaiting his arrival just for crossing illegally?  That won't lure people in.  What was he in prison for?  Did he communicate his medical need before the seizure?  In what language?  Do we need interpreters awaiting the illegals crossers too?  Would he have died if was in his country?  Would have an American have died in the same situation? 

The more we send free [stuff] to the illegals including healthcare, food, clothing, housing, transportation, all the essentials of life, the more illegals will come.  If a man brings a purchased, trafficked, hostage underage girl with him that he has raped, we welcome them as a family?  What is wrong with this escalating cycle? 

The way to have fewer treatment issues of illegals is to have fewer illegals coming in.


Crafty_Dog

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« Last Edit: July 17, 2019, 06:00:26 PM by Crafty_Dog »

Crafty_Dog

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ccp

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Dan Horowitz crime already going back up
« Reply #165 on: November 26, 2019, 09:02:02 AM »
Look at Alabama:

https://omny.fm/shows/the-conservative-conscience-with-daniel-horowitz-1/ep-535-this-attorney-general-has-had-enough-of-the

Yeah Jarrod got an agreement for crime bill
and Trump can go around saying

"I helped Black people ";

For some reason Dan does not state the elephant in the room:

prison reform from the point of view of the right is mostly if not solely to get more votes from minorities

Fine, but that said

I agree with him. Crime will go up at the expense of the rest of this.

We shall see , and I promise I will not say I told those who are excited about this : I told you so!




G M

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Re: Dan Horowitz crime already going back up
« Reply #166 on: November 26, 2019, 05:03:10 PM »
You are on your own for protecting yourself and your loved ones. Plan and train accordingly.


Look at Alabama:

https://omny.fm/shows/the-conservative-conscience-with-daniel-horowitz-1/ep-535-this-attorney-general-has-had-enough-of-the

Yeah Jarrod got an agreement for crime bill
and Trump can go around saying

"I helped Black people ";

For some reason Dan does not state the elephant in the room:

prison reform from the point of view of the right is mostly if not solely to get more votes from minorities

Fine, but that said

I agree with him. Crime will go up at the expense of the rest of this.

We shall see , and I promise I will not say I told those who are excited about this : I told you so!





Crafty_Dog

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Bill would send Non-violent Elderly to serve house arrest for rest of sentence.
« Reply #171 on: February 09, 2020, 12:54:42 PM »
House-passed bill would allow more nonviolent elderly prisoners to serve the rest of their sentence at home, instead of in jail
GovTrack.us
GovTrack.us
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Feb 7 · 3 min read

Rep. Ted Deutch (D-FL22)
More people aged 60 and older could get a “get out of jail free” card.

Context

The Second Chance Act of 2007 allowed some elderly prisoners to serve the remainder of their sentence at home, if they were at least 65 and had served either 10 years or ¾ of their sentence — whichever was longer.

The First Step Act of 2018 expanded the number of prisoners eligible, by reducing the age from 65 to 60, and reducing the time served to either 10 years or ⅔ of their sentence — still whichever is longer. Terminably ill prisoners were also made eligible.
However, the program doesn’t factor in time off a prisoner’s sentence for good behavior, which under federal law can be reduced by up to 54 days per year of the original sentence.

That’s a departure from the standard practice of the federal Bureau of Prisoners, which factors in time off for good behavior when — for example — deciding whether to move a prisoner to a lower-security facility.

What the bill does

A House bill would reduce the home stay of a nonviolent elderly prisoner eligible for the early-release program, factoring in their accumulated time off earned for good behavior.

Unlike most congressional legislation, this one does not appear to have an official title.

It was introduced in the House on July 25 as bill number H.R. 4018, by Rep. Ted Deutch (D-FL22).

What supporters say

Supporters argue the recidivism rate for elderly prisoners is much lower than for younger prisoners, making their release to home much less risky — and that it would save taxpayer money in the process.

“We are making an important clarification to the pilot program that allows elderly prisoners to transition to home confinement for the remainder of their sentence,” Rep. Deutch said in a press release. “As elderly prisoners are among the most vulnerable populations in prisons, this fix to include good time credit will allow more of them to benefit from this program. Not only is this the right thing to do, but it will also reduce federal costs in our prison system.”

GovTrack Insider was unable to locate any explicit statements of opposition, although eight House Republicans opposed the bill in committee without saying why.

Odds of passage

The House Judiciary Committee approved the bill on September 10 by a 28–8 vote. Democrats voted unanimously 21–0, while Republicans narrowly opposed it 7–8.

It then passed the full House on December 3 by a voice vote, a procedure usually used for noncontroversial legislation in which no record of individual votes is cast. Considering that a number of Republicans opposed the bill in committee, it’s unclear why a voice vote was used in the full chamber.

But no Republicans spoke against the bill on the House floor, after lead sponsor Rep. Deutch gave his speech in favor.

This article was written by GovTrack Insider staff writer Jesse Rifkin.
« Last Edit: February 09, 2020, 02:38:05 PM by Crafty_Dog »

Crafty_Dog

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G M

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Re: Bail
« Reply #173 on: February 13, 2020, 04:48:04 PM »

Crafty_Dog

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WSJ: NY No Bail Fiasco
« Reply #176 on: March 07, 2020, 08:29:20 AM »
The ‘No Bail’ Fiasco in New York
Crime is breaking out again amid a get-out-of-jail-free law.
By The Editorial Board
March 6, 2020 7:09 pm ET


You know New York has a problem when even Mayor Bill de Blasio admits it. On Thursday the New York Police Department held a press conference to report that major crime is up 22.5% this February over a year ago. Both the cops and the mayor attribute the spike to the bail reform pushed through the state Legislature in Albany last year, which is releasing people who have been arrested for one crime to go out and commit another.

“There’s a direct correlation to a change in the law, and we need to address it, and we will address it,” Mr. de Blasio said of the increase in crime. The mayor also said he was “absolutely confident” it will be addressed in Albany in the budget due April 1.


The Democratic Legislature, with the backing of both Mr. de Blasio and Gov. Andrew Cuomo, ended cash bail last year. The goal was to prevent cases such as that of Kalief Browder, a 16-year-old charged with stealing a backpack. Because his family could not afford bail he spent three years in prison on Rikers Island—much of it in solitary—without being tried or convicted of a crime. After his release, he ultimately committed suicide.

The sensible part of bail reform was aimed at preventing injustices such as this one. The non-sensible part was to deprive judges of the discretion to keep behind bars criminals who remain a menace to the community.

The law went into effect on Jan. 1, and the NYPD numbers are sobering: “In the first 58 days of 2020, 482 individuals who had already been arrested for committing a serious (felony) crime such as robbery or burglary were rearrested for committing an additional 846 crimes. Thirty-five percent, or 299, were for arrests in the seven major crime categories—murder, rape, robbery, felony assault, burglary, grand larceny and grand larceny auto—that is nearly triple the amount of those crimes committed in the same 58 days in 2019.”

Police Commissioner Dermot Shea underscored the main point: “Each number represents a victim.”

Some on the political left, including a coalition of public defenders, claim the cops are deliberately manipulating the figures as “scare tactics.” Ditto for Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie, who is blaming the New York Post, which refuses to take dictation from the city’s progressive powers. Mayor de Blasio is having none of it. “They’re wrong,” he says.

Another crime problem that Mr. de Blasio doesn’t acknowledge is the explosion of minor offenses since the City Council decriminalized such antisocial behavior as urinating in public, smoking marijuana in public, and turnstile jumping on the subways. This creates a culture of tolerance for lawlessness that the bail reform has compounded.

Polls show support for the bail reform dropping fast, and New York’s chief judge says it is the only state in which judges do not have the ability to consider whether a defendant poses a credible risk of danger before releasing him. There is a simple fix that would take care of the biggest problem: Give judges the ability to weigh this risk before letting people out. If Albany doesn’t fix this, we hope the voters run them all out office.