Author Topic: American History  (Read 135545 times)

ccp

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GW's mom
« Reply #300 on: December 26, 2019, 09:18:20 AM »


Crafty_Dog

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Crafty_Dog

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DougMacG

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Re: Wilson's Palmer Raids
« Reply #304 on: January 04, 2020, 08:21:12 AM »
https://fee.org/articles/the-palmer-raids-america-s-forgotten-reign-of-terror/?utm_source=zapier

"Ironically, none of those arrested had done anywhere near as much harm to those values as the man living in the White House—Woodrow Wilson, arguably the worst of the country’s 45 presidents."

   - My dad said that his dad voted for Woodrow Wilson and regretted it,  making it 100 years since anyone in our family voted Democrat, possible unknownn of my daughter's secret ballot.

Strange you would think to the Left that these egregious acts against rights came from Left icons WW, FDR, B.O., not Reagan, Bush, Trump.

Crafty_Dog

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GPF: The French and Indian Wars
« Reply #305 on: January 08, 2020, 06:36:04 AM »
Braddock's Defeat: The Battle of the Monongahela and the Road to Revolution
David L. Preston

Gen. Edward Braddock was a British commander in what was called the French and Indian War, a subset of the Seven Years’ War, which pitted England and France against each other and then drew in the rest of Europe. In the United States the war was between the French, who wanted to drive the English out of North America, and the English, who wanted to do the same to the French by driving them and their Indian allies west, cross the Appalachians and cease the French holding in the Louisiana Territory. The war was fought between 1754 and 1763, roughly paralleling the Seven Years’ War (1756-63).

The most important outcome of the French and Indian War was not the result itself but its creation of the American people. Until then, the colonists in North America regarded themselves as English. In the south in particular, the settlers had sought to create an English life and social order. George Washington’s grandfather was a failed English gentleman, trapped in the religious wars that had raged there. He came to North America to start a new life, acquiring a great deal of land on the fertile soil of Virginia. His life, like those of his son and grandson, was focused on the land and agriculture. They made up for their lack of serfs with African slaves, and with those slaves his family lived the life of the English gentry. That is how they saw themselves and who they were.

When the war broke out, George Washington, the United States’ first president, was given a commission in the king’s army under Braddock. Washington discovered that Braddock did not know how to fight a war in the Appalachians, the battlefield of the war. Braddock was an Englishman, and the wars he was accustomed to fighting had been on the plains of Northern Europe. There, wars were won by disciplined armies, marching and firing in sequence in orderly formation. Anyone who has ever visited the Appalachians knows that larger formations marching together is impossible. The problem is not the mountains as much as the impassable vegetation. Wars in the Appalachians are fought one man at a time, moving through the trees and thick brush.

Braddock was appalled by this disorder and demanded that his commanders, including Washington, fight the English way, an impossibility. Washington’s generation discovered the contempt that Braddock and the English commanders felt for the colonists. Washington might think of himself as a gentleman, and other colonists might see him that way, but to the English, they were all near-barbarians. Braddock, despite losing battle after battle, remained rigid in his views, and the colonists emerged from the war stung by English contempt and incompetence.
The French and Indian War forced the colonists to face the fact that the English didn’t see them as English gentlemen. To the English, they were something else. It was at this moment that the idea emerged of the English colonists as a separate people. This is when Americans found who they were. The colonists’ later animosity toward England arose out of the contempt for them shown by Braddock and his officers and those officers’ inability to grasp the American battlefield. Braddock’s defeat at Monongahela capped this.

There were no Americans in 1754. There were many in 1763. And by 1776, they had declared themselves separate and independent from England and were at war with the English. Had the French and Indian War not been fought in the Appalachians, and had Braddock been able to grasp a new way of war, there might not have been Americans. But of course, that was where the war had to be waged, and an English general would not understand that. But it is important to know this war, because that is where this nation was forged.

Crafty_Dog

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DougMacG

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Re: 1619 history? Nevermind , , ,
« Reply #309 on: March 14, 2020, 10:55:23 AM »

ccp

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Re: American History
« Reply #310 on: March 14, 2020, 11:02:22 AM »
". Seven months later, 1619 Project leader admits she got it wrong"

DID NYT report the hoax?