Author Topic: California  (Read 231886 times)

Crafty_Dog

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Re: California
« Reply #700 on: November 12, 2018, 10:32:55 AM »
Thanks for thinking of me, but even though across the expanse of the Great South Bay we can see those near Malibu at night, we are well away from any actual danger.

Crafty_Dog

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Re: California
« Reply #701 on: December 10, 2018, 04:42:01 AM »
Sometimes this site hyperventilates, but on the whole it does a good job of what is going down in California.

http://www.capoliticalreview.com/capoliticalnewsandviews/

Crafty_Dog

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CA SCT to rule on California Rule
« Reply #702 on: December 10, 2018, 10:55:16 AM »




DougMacG

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Re: VDH: California coastal elites, poor immigrants, fleeing middle class
« Reply #706 on: January 02, 2019, 09:40:53 AM »
https://www.nationalreview.com/2019/01/california-coastal-elites-poor-immigrants-fleeing-middle-class/

Many unfortunate, little known facts in there.

"60,000 Californians on average have left for Texas each year of the last decade"


This phenomenon moved both states Leftward.

ccp

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MSM lies
« Reply #707 on: January 09, 2019, 07:49:27 AM »
https://news.yahoo.com/gavin-newsom-sets-bold-costly-agenda-california-staking-future-party-success-171713354.html

" The promise part is simple. While newly empowered House Democrats still have to contend with President Trump and a Republican Senate, Newsom will enjoy legislative supermajorities, an estimated $14.8 billion budget surplus and a projected $14.5 billion rainy-day reserve fund.

But this is an abject lie and total coverup :

https://www.forbes.com/sites/thomasdelbeccaro/2018/04/19/the-top-four-reasons-california-is-unsustainable/#f8bd1513a239


"According to a January 2017 study, “California state and local governments owe $1.3 trillion as of June 30, 2015.”

So what does crazy shit Newsom propose ?

driving the whole states over the cliff and into the sea.

DougMacG

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Re: California, out on a rail
« Reply #708 on: January 11, 2019, 07:21:28 PM »
Out on A Rail
The air is so much fresher now

The sea is strangely clam

Like Gilead, Tarzana

Is blessed with healing balm

California’s gold again

No longer lead—with gilding

The reason for our renaissance?

Jerry Brown has left the building

We give him to the DNC

As our gift to the nation

Amazing that an empty suit

Can do such devastation

He sidestepped every issue

Avoided real debates

And left the highest poverty

In all the 50 states

He promised forward thinking

But played us all for fools

His sanctuary policies

Ruined neighborhoods and schools

His one unique achievement

His legacy of fame

A scam of such proportion

It puts boondoggles to shame

I loved my daily train ride

From Grand Central to Mt. Kisko

But man will be on Mars before

His train makes San Francisco

We all live with our choices

You win some and you rue some

So now we have to deal with

His heir in Gavin Newsome

If you want to be real useful

Gavin, just pick up the phone

And re-direct that railway

From LA to San Antone


TarzanaJoe.com

ccp

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Jerry Brown
« Reply #709 on: January 12, 2019, 06:02:51 AM »
and moon beam
claims to have
fixed California with a
22 billion surplus
when after the lied we
see fornians  are saddled
with 1.3 trillion in debt/liabilities
and he wants to gift this
form of governing
to the rest of what is soon
go be a past  glorious nation.
fornians have smoked the marijuana
the rich will pay for it all




Crafty_Dog

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G M

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Crafty_Dog

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Re: California
« Reply #714 on: January 27, 2019, 05:21:23 PM »
Florida can compete with this you know , , ,  :-D

G M

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Re: California
« Reply #715 on: January 27, 2019, 05:29:31 PM »
Florida can compete with this you know , , ,  :-D

Florida is much more meth and alligator-centric in newsworthy events.  :wink:

Crafty_Dog

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WSJ: Newsome mostly pulls plug on train to nowhere
« Reply #716 on: February 14, 2019, 09:44:02 AM »

Link copied…

    Opinion Review & Outlook

Death of a California Dream
Gavin Newsom gives up on Jerry Brown’s bullet-train fiasco.
0 Comments
By The Editorial Board
Feb. 13, 2019 6:38 p.m. ET
One of the elevated sections of the high-speed rail under construction in Fresno, Calif. in 2017.
One of the elevated sections of the high-speed rail under construction in Fresno, Calif. in 2017. Photo: Rich Pedroncelli/Associated Press

Like Richard Nixon and the Vietnam War, California Gov. Gavin Newsom inherited a quagmire in the state’s bullet train with no good options. Rather than attempt a full-out retreat, the Governor announced Tuesday that he would cut taxpayer losses by completing a segment in the sparsely populated San Joaquin Valley. But please don’t call it a train to nowhere.
Potomac Watch Podcast
Green New Deal Divides Democrats
Why Republicans don't want another shutdown, and the Green New Deal divides Democrats.

A decade ago California voters approved a $10 billion bond measure to build a 520-mile high-speed train that would supposedly take riders from San Francisco to Los Angeles in two hours and 40 minutes. The choo-choo’s supporters vowed that the federal government and private investors would foot most of the estimated $33 billion bill, and the referendum explicitly stated there would be no subsidy. President Trump’s promise to make Mexico pay for a border wall was more believable.

The Obama Administration chipped in $3.5 billion on the condition the first 160-mile segment be built in the San Joaquin Valley district of Democratic Rep. Jim Costa, a longtime bullet-train supporter who provided a critical vote for ObamaCare. Former Gov. Jerry Brown made the train his special legacy project, his contribution at taxpayer expense to the illusion of stopping climate change. His people sent letter after letter claiming that our editorials were mistaken.

Our criticisms have now been validated by none other than Mr. Newsom. Cost projections for the train have soared to around $80 billion amid litigation, engineering challenges and ordinary government morass. Private investors have run the other way. The state rail authority has spent more than $5 billion acquiring and destroying hundreds of properties but not yet laid tracks. Taxpayers have lost patience, and Mr. Newsom stated the obvious on Tuesday that “there simply isn’t a path to get from Sacramento to San Diego, let alone from San Francisco to LA.”

The new Governor is thus proposing to finish the initial planned route from Merced to Bakersfield, now with the stated goal of revitalizing rural areas that have been parched due to water rationing. Lo, high-speed rail is “about economic transformation and unlocking the enormous potential of the Valley,” which is “hungry for investment” and “good jobs.” Mr. Newsom in his speech also pared back a project championed by Mr. Brown to deliver more water to farmers.

Liberals envision that the bullet train will someday turn Fresno and Merced into Silicon Valley suburbs and ease the Bay Area’s housing shortage. But this too is a dream. As economic consultants William Grindley and Bill Warren document in a recent study, a worker who lives in Fresno would spend 10 hours and 20 minutes each day commuting to San Jose at a cost of $154 round trip—assuming no subsidies.

California’s bullet train provides a miniature model of the Green New Deal. Alas, the main reason liberals like Mr. Newsom are likely turning against it is they are eager to redirect taxpayer money to entitlements and other green largesse.

Appeared in the February 14, 2019, print edition.

DougMacG

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Re: WSJ: Newsome mostly pulls plug on train to nowhere
« Reply #717 on: February 15, 2019, 06:24:35 AM »
Looks like Leftist incrementalism to me.  They are keeping a middle section that goes from nowhere to nowhere but locks in the federal subsidy.  That keeps the issue of funding the rest alive - with more money from the Feds likely if their candidates win.


Crafty_Dog

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Calguns flow chart 9/15/18
« Reply #719 on: March 04, 2019, 10:16:41 AM »

G M

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ccp

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Arnold has biovalve not mechanical
« Reply #724 on: May 18, 2019, 02:00:25 PM »
was wondering so I found this

https://www.heart-valve-surgery.com/arnold-schwarzenegger.php

if he had mechanical he would be on blood thinners and the injury he sustained might have been more dangerous.

DougMacG

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California energy: 80% fossil fuels
« Reply #725 on: May 28, 2019, 11:20:04 AM »
After all the hoopla, 13 years since 'Inconvenient Truth' 80% of California energy needs are met using fossil fuels.

California imports more of its electricity than any other state.

California has scheduled the shutdown of its only (carbon free) nuclear plant.

California environmental extremists object to (carbon free) large dam reservoirs required to produce major hydroelectric power.

With mismanagement of forests and power lines, California is burning massive fuel with massive Carbon emissions that don't generate a single watt.
https://wattsupwiththat.com/2019/05/26/despite-renewables-mandate-more-than-80-of-california-energy-needs-met-using-fossil-fuels/

OK, fine, but could they spare us all the drama about climate change if they don't plan to do anything real about it themselves.

It's not unique to California.  Germany is closing nuclear plants, "concerned" about Carbon and emissions are rising.  The more they switch to solar and wind, the more coal they burn, and itws the dirtiest of coal.
https://www.forbes.com/sites/jamesconca/2017/10/10/why-arent-renewables-decreasing-germanys-carbon-emissions/#62c884fe68e1
Once again, fine, but spare us the carbon lecture, and contain your real pollutants.

The more you replace nuclear with solar and wind, the more fossil fuels you will need to burn - to fill the gaps on the duck curve.

No one seems to have a valid rebuttal to my assertion, build nuclear or emit carbon. 
« Last Edit: May 28, 2019, 04:42:45 PM by DougMacG »

DougMacG

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Re: California drought and climate change
« Reply #726 on: May 30, 2019, 06:26:24 AM »
• Unless you live in California, where, we were told just a couple years ago, drought was now a permanent condition because of—wait for it!—climate change. However, California has received 160% of normal rainfall this year (and the official “rain calendar” runs to July 1, so there’s still more time to fill reservoirs already at 100% capacity in many cases), and it was still snowing heavily in California’s high mountains just last weekend. Mammoth Mountain ski resort expects to stay open for summer skiing into . . . August. But never forget: climate science is settled.
https://www.powerlineblog.com/archives/2019/05/loose-ends-84.php

DougMacG

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California, San Francisco is the nation’s leader in property crime
« Reply #727 on: June 09, 2019, 10:51:11 AM »
https://www.city-journal.org/san-francisco-crime

San Francisco is the nation’s leader in property crime. Burglary, larceny, shoplifting, and vandalism are included under this ugly umbrella. The rate of car break-ins is particularly striking: in 2017 over 30,000 reports were filed, and the current average is 51 per day. Other low-level offenses, including drug dealing, street harassment, encampments, indecent exposure, public intoxication, simple assault, and disorderly conduct are also rampant.

...theft is indisputably booming, and narcotics activity is exploding on sidewalks, parks, and playgrounds. When compounded with other troubles for which the city is now infamous (human feces, filth, and homelessness, which is up 17 percent since 2017), San Franciscans find themselves surrounded by squalor and disorder.
...
“Now people look at the city as an abscess,” he says. “The cost of housing compared to the quality of life is way off. Everyone is talking about it. Crime has been ignored for so long, and it’s gotten so huge. Serial repeat offenders have no problem making bail, especially drug dealers, as they see it as the cost of doing business.”
---------------------------
In 2020 Americans will have the opportunity to bring these successes to the whole nation.

G M

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California's planned blackouts
« Reply #728 on: June 21, 2019, 07:28:57 PM »
https://www.city-journal.org/california-planned-blackouts

It's the unplanned ones you really have to worry about.

G M

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America’s First Third-World State
« Reply #729 on: June 23, 2019, 05:57:05 PM »
https://www.nationalreview.com/2019/06/california-third-world-state-corruption-crime-infrastructure/

America’s First Third-World State
By VICTOR DAVIS HANSON
June 18, 2019 6:30 AM
 
A man who said he is homeless stands outside his makeshift home near a housing construction project in San Francisco, Calif., in 2015.   (Robert Galbraith/Reuters)
Medieval diseases, gangs, corruption, crime, crumbling infrastructure, out-of-touch wealthy elites …
‘Third World” is now an anachronistic geographical term of the old Cold War. But after 1989, “Third World” was reinvented from a political noun into an adjective to mean more than just Asian, African, and Latin American nations nonaligned with either the West or the Soviet bloc.

Rather, the current modifier “Third World” has come to transcend geography, politics, and ethnicity. It simply denotes poor failed states all over the globe of all races and religions.

Third World symptomologies are predictably corrupt government, unequal or nonexistent applicability of the law, two rather than three classes, and the return of medieval diseases. Third World nations suffer from high taxes and poor social services, premodern infrastructure and utilities, poor transportation, tribalism, gangs, and lack of security.

Another chief characteristic of a Third World society is the official denial of all of the above, and a vindictive, almost hysterical state response to anyone who points out those obvious tragedies. Another is massive out-migration. Residents prefer almost any country other than their own. Think Somalia, Venezuela, Cuba, Libya, or Guatemala.

Does 21st-century California increasingly fit that definition — despite having the nation’s most amenable climate and most beautiful and diverse geography, with major natural ports facing the dynamic Asian economies, and being naturally rich in timber, agriculture, mining, and energy, and blessed with a prior century’s inheritance of effective local and state government?

 

The California Manor

By many criteria, 21st-century California is both the poorest and the richest state in the union. Almost a quarter of the population lives below the poverty line. Another fifth is categorized as near the poverty level — facts not true during the latter 20th century. A third of the nation’s welfare recipients now live in California. The state has the highest homeless population in the nation (135,000). About 22 percent of the nation’s total homeless population reside in the state — whose economy is the largest in the U.S., fueling the greatest numbers of American billionaires and high-income zip codes.

But by some indicators, the California middle class is shrinking — because of massive regulation, high taxation, green zoning, and accompanying high housing prices. Out-migration from the state remains largely a phenomenon of the middle and upper-middle classes. Millions have left California in the past 30 years, replaced by indigent and often illegal immigrants, often along with the young, affluent, and single.

If someone predicted half a century ago that a Los Angeles police station or indeed L.A. City Hall would be in danger of periodic, flea-borne infectious typhus outbreaks, he would have been considered unhinged. After all, the city that gave us the modern freeway system is not supposed to resemble Justinian’s sixth-century Constantinople. Yet typhus, along with outbreaks of infectious hepatitis A, are in the news on California streets. The sidewalks of the state’s major cities are homes to piles of used needles, feces, and refuse. Hygienists warn that permissive municipal governments are setting the stage — through spiking populations of history’s banes of fleas, lice, and rats — for possible dark-age outbreaks of plague or worse.

High tech does its part not to clean the streets but to create defecation apps that electronically warn tourists and hoi polloi how to avoid walking blindly into piles of sidewalk excrement. In Californian logic, public defecation butts up against progressive tolerance, so it is exempt from the law. Yet for a suburbanite to build a patio without a permit, for example, costs one dearly in fines. Indeed, a new patio without a permit can be deemed more dangerous to the public health than piles of excrement in the public workplace.

One out of three Californians who enters a hospital for any cause is now found to be suffering from either diabetes or pre-diabetes, an epidemic that hits the Hispanic community especially hard but for a variety of reasons has not led to effective public-health efforts and sufficient publicity. State-run dialysis clinics now dot the towns and communities of the Central Valley — a tragic symptom of dietary culture, massive illegal immigration, and poor public-health education.

 

Infrastructure Is for the Unwoke

California’s transportation system, to be honest, remains in near ruins. Despite the highest gas taxes in the nation, none of its major trans-state freeways — not the 99, not I-5, not the 101 — after 70 years off use, are yet completed with six lanes, resulting in dangerous bottlenecks and wrecks. Driving the 99 south of Visalia, or the 101 near Paso Robles, or the 5 north of Coalinga is right out of Road Warrior — but not as dangerous as the fossilized two-line feeder lines such as 152 into Gilroy, or the 41 west of Kettleman City. The unspoken transportation credo of Jerry Brown’s aggregate 16 years as governor apparently was “If you don’t build it, maybe they won’t need it.”

Meanwhile the concrete carcass of the recently cancelled multibillion-dollar high-speed rail system dots the skyline over Fresno. Bureaucrats now insist that more billions must be spent to ensure that a short segment of the least traveled route will be finished, though they obviously do not anticipate spurring a new tourist or commercial corridor between Merced and Bakersfield.

High-speed-rail gurus insist on salvaging something of the boondoggle not because they have an economic rationale justifying more dollars — they would be far better invested in improving freeways, airports, and rails — but largely out of pride and shame that demand some small token rescued from a very bad pipe dream.

In 1973, when I first visited and lived in Greece, the roads were medieval. The old Hellinikon Airport was dysfunctional, if not creepy. Highway rest stops were filthy. I have lived in or visited Greece in the ensuing 45 years since, including occasionally after the 2008 meltdown and European Union standoff. And yet today, the freeways, chief airport, and rest stops of relatively poor Greece are in far better shape than are California’s. LAX’s poor road access, traffic, uncleanness, crowds, and chaos seem premodern compared with the current Athenian airport.

It is an eerie experience to see America’s once premier state, currently at its supposed acme, now resemble Greece of the colonels a half-century ago, while 2019 Greece seems more like a functioning 1973 California. Athens and Thessaloniki are still dirty in a few places, and there are homeless and illegal immigrants. But one does not see needles and feces on the sidewalks, and it is safe to walk in the evening. Greek public restrooms, once notorious, are far more sanitary than those at rest stops in Fresno, San Francisco, or Los Angeles.

Power outrages are characteristic of Third World countries. Here in California we are advised to brace for lots of them, given that our antiquated grid apparently contributes to brush fires on hot days. As a native, I do not remember a single instance of our 20th-century state utilities shutting down service in the manner that they now routinely promise.

 

California for Others

Crime the last three years has increased. It is epidemic in local jails. San Francisco has the highest property-crime rate per capita of any major city. The California prison system is a mess, and sanctuary cities ensure that illegal aliens charged with crimes will not be deported. Pick up a McClatchy paper and you’ll see that the day’s fare of Central Valley criminality, even after sanitization and editorialization, is mind-boggling.

California’s cycles of wet boom years and dry bust years continue because the state refuses to build three or four additional large reservoirs that have been planned for more than a half-century, and that would store enough water to keep California functional through even the worst drought. The rationale is either that it is more sophisticated to allow millions of acre-feet of melted snow to run into the sea, or it is better to have a high-speed-rail line from Merced to Bakersfield than an additional 10 million acre-feet of water storage, or droughts ensure more state control through rationing and green social-policy remedies.

Twenty-seven percent of Californians were not born in the United States, a large minority of them residing in the United States illegally. Yet California’s universities and popular culture are at the forefront of salad-bowl and identity-politics policies that obstruct assimilation, integration, and intermarriage — the historical remedies for the natural tensions that arise within multiracial and multiethnic societies. In this perfect storm, at the very moment the world’s poorest citizens from Oaxaca and Central America flooded into America, de facto rejecting the protocols of their home, their hosts’ messaging to them was that they should lodge complaints about the social injustice of their new home and romanticize the culture that they had just forsaken for good cause.

California schools are usually in the bottom decile of national rankings. No one in polite conversation asks why that is so, given that the state’s K–12 schools used to be among the most competitive in the United States.

Yet, again in medieval fashion, the professional schools and science and technology departments of California’s premier research universities — Cal Tech, Stanford, UC Berkeley, UCLA, USC — are among the highest-rated in the world. Imagine something like the scribal oases of Padua, Oxford, or Paris in an otherwise frightening 13th century. If one wishes to be schooled as an electrical engineer or cancer researcher, California is an attractive place; if one wishes to be a knowledgeable graduate of a public elementary and high school, it most certainly is not.

California’s Department of Motor Vehicles is perhaps the worst public-service entity in the United States. To enter any branch office is to venture into a Dante’s Inferno of huge lines, chaos, unkept rest rooms, and rude and often incompetent unionized employees. The only efficient DMV office in the state is the unmarked and secret branch in Sacramento reserved for state legislators and grandee insiders who oversee the DMV for the rest of the population. For a fee, concierge private auto clubs and firms often duplicate some DMV services, a de facto admission that the state needs something else besides itself to offer basic services. I once asked a DMV clerk, after a long wait in line, if it was right to be wearing a purple SEIU organizing T-shirt; she replied, “Do you still want to be served?”

The DMV scandals are multifarious: Thousands of motor-voter registrations sent to the wrong people, including illegal aliens supposedly ineligible to vote; corrupt employees who sell commercial truck driver’s licenses to the unqualified; and private corporations and occasionally individuals selling hard-to-obtain reservations and appointments.

California now has the nation’s highest basket of sales, gas, and income taxes. With a state surplus, and a slowing economy, one would think that the legislature and governor would pause before even considering raising more taxes. After all, new federal tax law limits write-offs of state and local taxes to $10,000 — radically spiking upper-bracket Californians’ federal tax liabilities.

Yet the rule in California is to punish the upper middle class while pandering to the rich and romanticizing the poor. Thus, the legislature is now considering a punitive new inheritance tax, and it just imposed an Internet sales tax.

Again, the message is that if Californians can survive a recent 13.3 percent top state-income-tax rate, and a vast increase in their federal tax liability, then certainly they can be easily squeezed further after death to pony up 40 percent of their already taxed estates that are over $3 million in value. Translated, that can mean that a tract house in Los Angeles or the Bay Area and a modest 401K are proof that you did not build your wealth on your own, so the state has a second shot at appropriating your postmortem capital, to ensure that your children will see no benefit from your parsimony and thrift.

California’s apocalyptic present has created an alternate universe, in good Third World style, of pay-for-play services. To avoid the emergency room (the last time I used one, two gangs squared off in the waiting room, to continue what their wounded members were under treatment for), progressive Californians often pay for concierge medicine and anything private to avoid at all costs using any state services.

The coastal corridor elite often put their kids in tony prep schools that have sprung up or vastly expanded, in the fashion of the 1960s white Southern academies that were designed to circumvent federal desegregation edicts. Elite progressives mimic old-style, 1960s segregationists but feel that their children’s green and multicultural curricula offer enough penance to assuage their guilt over abandoning the state’s much praised “diverse” schools.

 

Our Dreams, Your Nightmares

What caused this lunacy?

A polarity of importing massive poverty from south of the border while pandering to those who control unprecedented wealth in Silicon Valley, Hollywood, the tourism industry, and the marquee universities. Massive green regulations and boutique zoning, soaring taxes, increasing crime, identity politics and tribalism, and radical one-party progressive government were force multipliers. It is common to blame California Republicans for their own demise. They have much to account for, but in some sense, the state simply deported conservative voters and imported their left-wing replacements.

In a reductionist sense, perhaps if former governor Jerry Brown knew that he would one day retire to Delano and drive the 99 daily, rather than to Grass Valley, with several state pensions in his bank account, or if Dianne Feinstein dwelled in an East Palo Alto or Redwood City residence rather than in Pacific Heights, or if all the Pelosi grandchildren had to attend state public schools, then the architects of 21st-century California might have had to live with the consequences of their own dreams and been less eager to inflict their nightmares on the other 40 million Californians.

172
But then again, such a radical divergence between a few insider elites and a massive underclass, with little in between, is perhaps what best defines “Third World.”


Crafty_Dog

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ccp

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Willy Brown's later love after kamala
« Reply #732 on: July 01, 2019, 05:04:50 PM »
did Willy ditch Kamala for this babe?:


https://heavy.com/news/2019/01/sonya-molodetskaya-willie-brown-partner/

just another poll who like to live the high life . 
but it is ok
he is such a good Democrat - for the people ! :roll:

Crafty_Dog

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Re: California
« Reply #733 on: July 02, 2019, 07:54:12 AM »
According to the article Willie had been separated from his wife for over ten years when he was dating Kamala.

G M

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Re: California
« Reply #734 on: July 02, 2019, 08:06:10 AM »
According to the article Willie had been separated from his wife for over ten years when he was dating Kamala.

 :roll:

Did Willie’s wife know about the separation? I’m sure that is being actively retconned.

G M

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Not just California
« Reply #735 on: July 08, 2019, 10:22:19 AM »

ccp

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california
« Reply #736 on: August 01, 2019, 06:13:13 AM »
huge dem advantage .
no not due to prop 187 but to higher taxes etc:
https://www.nationalreview.com/2019/08/why-gop-declined-in-california/

I don't buy it .   Of course it is immigration .

Crafty_Dog

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Re: California
« Reply #737 on: August 08, 2019, 12:01:41 AM »
The hypothesis has merit IMHO.  Top Dog Eric Knaus would be an example. He picked up his business telephone comm business and moved to Houston.



ccp

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"No, California's Finances Are Not Back In Black"
« Reply #740 on: August 27, 2019, 02:28:04 PM »
"The truth is that there is no revenue surplus had by California state government. In fact, the state’s long-run obligations far exceed projected revenue collections to the tune of $1 trillion in unfunded pension liabilities alone. When factoring in the cost of non-pension benefits for state workers, such as health care for retired government employees, the debt facing California taxpayers rises further. "

The lying deceitful manipulative scheysters who run our governments.

That is the same as if the Feds said they have no soc. sec. or medicare to finance and thus leaving out  those numbers can lies and say we are doing better.

The cowards are going to drive as all over the cliff.

The private sector is going to spend forever paying for the government's employees to retire in the states living off us,  and in the fed SS and Medicare will default.
« Last Edit: August 27, 2019, 02:55:26 PM by ccp »


G M

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California Love
« Reply #742 on: September 19, 2019, 09:23:53 PM »



Crafty_Dog

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New Gun Laws in CA
« Reply #745 on: October 12, 2019, 04:39:16 PM »


California: Governor Newsom Signs Anti-Gun Bills into Law
 
Today, Governor Newsom signed seven anti-gun bills into law  — continuing the assault on our Second Amendment rights in the Golden State. These new laws pile onto the hundreds of existing laws and, like the others, will be equally ignored by criminals. Your NRA will not back down while we explore further action on these new laws.

Assembly Bill 12, sponsored by Assembly Member Jacqui Irwin (D-44), would extend the duration of California’s “gun violence restraining order” law from one year to a period of up to five years. Meaning a person could be prohibited from owning and possessing firearms for five years at a time without ever being adjudicated as dangerously mentally ill or convicted of a crime.   

Assembly Bill 61, sponsored by Assembly Member Philip Ting (D-19), would expand the list of those eligible to file “gun violence restraining orders” beyond the currently authorized petitioners, which include immediate family and law enforcement.  The new list is expanded to employers, coworkers and employees of a secondary or postsecondary school that the person has attended in the last 6 months.  GVRO’s can remove a person’s Second Amendment rights, not based on criminal convictions or mental health adjudications, but based on third party allegations, often without due process until weeks after a person’s rights have been suspended.   

Assembly Bill 879, sponsored by Assembly Member Mike Gipson (D-64), would require precursor firearms parts to be sold/transferred through a licensed precursor parts dealer in a similar process to the new laws regarding ammunition purchases. It would further create a registry of these parts and a new crime for transfer of precursor parts without the involvement of a licensed precursor parts dealer to anyone under 21 years of age or prohibited from owning firearms. Precursor parts include items such as unfinished frames and receivers.   

Assembly Bill 893, sponsored by Assembly Member Todd Gloria (D-78), would prohibit the sale of firearms and ammunition at the Del Mar fairgrounds located in the 22nd District Agricultural Association on and after January 1, 2021. 
Assembly Bill 1297, sponsored by Assembly Member Kevin McCarty (D-7), would remove the maximum fee a local authority can charge on the concealed carry permit application.   

Assembly Bill 1669, sponsored by Assembly Member Rob Bonta (D-18), would raise the fees paid by consumers when purchasing firearms. The DROS account has generated a massive surplus at times, so much so that tens of millions of dollars that have been utilized to fund other DOJ programs, including a $24 million dollar loan to the Armed Prohibited Persons System (APPS) just a few years ago. This legislation appears nothing more than an effort to put more cost constraints on gun owners to foot the bill for the massive cost pressures the legislature has put on DOJ in recent years including ammunition background checks and long gun registration.     

Senate Bill 61, sponsored by Senator Anthony Portantino (D-25), as amended would expand California’s existing one handgun a month law to also apply to handguns or centerfire semi-automatic rifles, with limited exceptions. Further the bill expands the prohibition on acquisition of firearms by a person under 21 years of age by eliminating the existing exception for 18-20 year-olds with a valid hunting license.     

Continue to check your inbox and the California Stand and Fight webpage for updates on issues impacting your Second Amendment rights and hunting heritage.



DougMacG

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Crafty_Dog

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Re: California
« Reply #749 on: October 20, 2019, 07:25:22 PM »
Some quality trolling there  :-o :-D :-D