Author Topic: The Trump Transition/Administration  (Read 82659 times)

G M

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Re: Trump Administration vs hurricane Woodward
« Reply #450 on: September 05, 2018, 08:45:47 AM »
No particular link to share, I'm sure you can get plenty of the preview highlights at the Washington Post today. No named sources as usual, The credibility or lack thereof all falls on Bob Woodward.

It's quite devastating material in the soap opera sense. My guess is that this changes nothing.

Mattis allegedly thinks Trump has the foreign policy understanding of a fifth or sixth grader. Someone else took letters off Trump's desk to keep him from signing orders that would bring down the country or the world, and so on.

Unless they have more, this kind of thing energizes his detractors and hardens his support. How will that affect the midterms?  Presumably it hurts him and hurts him badly, but energizing his detractors makes them go even more batshit crazy when it should make them want to lbecome the sane alternative. Does the sight of energized activists and 93% negative news coverage going further negative really win more votes?

Does the rest of the book cover the accomplishments of his presidency? Or does the consummate historian that Woodward purports to be skip all that and stay with the reality show perspective. See our thread on accomplishments. He doubled the growth rate of the largest economy in the history of the world, brought China, Mexico, North Korea, European Union and Canada to the bargaining table, filled the court with great judges and justices, secured our defenses and brought a level of transparency to the White House that hurts our eyes and ears.

Whatever the truth is about what he said about Assad after the chemical weapons attack, kill the bastards, all of them, just strengthens his position in negotiations with Kim Jeong Un and the Ayatollahs.  It also strengthens his hand with Xi that he will take any step and is not afraid of the backlash.

Which do the people want to hear about this election season, the accomplishments or the behind-the-scenes in-fighting?  Don't know, we'll see.

Woodward is a liar. This is just Dem fanfic.

Crafty_Dog

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Re: The Trump Transition/Administration
« Reply #451 on: September 05, 2018, 09:56:37 AM »

Woodward just got caught participating in the CNN-Lanny Davis lie.

Crafty_Dog

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Dina Powell
« Reply #452 on: October 12, 2018, 06:37:37 AM »
How could she even have been considered?

https://gellerreport.com/2018/10/powell-out.html/

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ccp

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Re: The Trump Transition/Administration
« Reply #454 on: October 14, 2018, 04:47:14 PM »
"PTOH goes after Jarad"

that is because they feel most of his money is  the property of the Dem Party and  not his.

Saw report of the on MSLSD ;  at the end of the hack job someone does throw in there as a quick aside,  "it is all perfectly legal"

DougMacG

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Re: POTH goes after Jared for not overpaying taxes
« Reply #455 on: October 15, 2018, 06:49:44 AM »
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/13/business/jared-kushner-taxes.html?partner=msft_msn

"it is all perfectly legal"

One WSJ column suggests we could learn a little from Trump family tax strategies after the uproar dies down.

I wonder if we'll see Obama's grades on the same day Trump releases his tax returns...

Crafty_Dog

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Acting AG Matthew Whitaker
« Reply #456 on: November 08, 2018, 09:32:45 AM »

DougMacG

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Re: Acting AG Matthew Whitaker
« Reply #457 on: November 09, 2018, 07:23:25 AM »
"BTW Judge Napolitano says Whitaker does not meet the legal requirements to be an Acting AG."

http://insider.foxnews.com/2018/11/08/judge-napolitano-matthew-whitaker-does-not-qualify-under-law-be-acting-attorney-general

Interesting. If his appointment does not have the authority of a principle officer, then a recess or regular appointment will be needed.  Until that time, can't Whitacker bring orders requiring greater authority to the Chief Executive for orders and signing?
-------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Appointments_Clause
"[the President] shall nominate, and by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, shall appoint Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls, Judges of the supreme Court, and all other Officers of the United States, ..."

I would agree with the argument he is not eligible in the line of succession to the Presidency as an official officer of the United States without Senate confirmation.
https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._Presidential_line_of_succession

ccp

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Re: The Trump Transition/Administration
« Reply #458 on: November 09, 2018, 07:29:46 AM »
did you see Chris Christie is in the running for AG
I know he is not popular but he could be the bulldog Trump needs ( ? )

Crafty_Dog

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Re: The Trump Transition/Administration
« Reply #459 on: November 09, 2018, 08:30:03 AM »
Whitaker is also getting hit with some serious sounding accusations of nasty business practices taking advantage of inventors.

I'd be fine with Christie for AG.  It is directly in his skill set, and like the President he knows how to duke it out with the Pravdas.


ccp

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ccp

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maybe ok pick
« Reply #463 on: November 16, 2018, 02:56:54 PM »
but the optics of World Wide Wrestling running the Commerce Department
is simply not what we need if this occurs:

https://www.newsmax.com/newsfront/mcmahon-ross-commerce-secretary/2018/11/16/id/890978/

OTOH she could produce more movies of Trump body slamming  CNN reporters   :wink:

G M

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Re: Whitaker appointment unconstitutional
« Reply #464 on: November 16, 2018, 03:15:00 PM »
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/08/opinion/trump-attorney-general-sessions-unconstitutional.html?fallback=0&recId=1CoxW2cE33b4iaJAoUaGLO9GcdQ&locked=0&geoContinent=NA&geoRegion=CO&recAlloc=most_popular&geoCountry=US&blockId=most-popular&imp_id=50574183&action=click&module=Most%20Popular&pgtype=Homepage

This analysis may well be correct.


I love the sudden reverence for the constitution from the left, just like their sudden reverence for due process upon the arrest of Avenetti.

 (BELIEVE ALL WIMMENS!!!!!11111!!!!!!! disappears in a puff of smoke)


Crafty_Dog

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NRO
« Reply #466 on: December 10, 2018, 10:52:32 AM »
   James Comey Is Proving that He’s a Partisan
By Jim Geraghty

December 10, 2018 11:04 AM

FBI Director James Comey attends a news conference on terrorism after speaking at the NYPD Shield Conference in the Manhattan borough of New York, December 16, 2015. (Darren Ornitz/Reuters)

Making the click-through worthwhile: former FBI director James Comey drops any pretense of being anything but a Democratic-party cheerleader these days, President Trump finds himself hunting for a chief of staff once again, a quick review of last week’s NR cruise, and a computer book to read before artificial intelligence takes over the world.

James Comey, Democratic-Party Cheerleader

Back when I reviewed former FBI director James Comey’s autobiography, I wrote:

    The notion that everyone around Comey at the top level of the FBI hesitated to keep his promise to inform Congress because it could help Trump win the election doesn’t exactly dispel Trump’s claim of widespread bias against him. In Comey’s late-November private Oval Office meeting with the president, he blurts out to the outgoing Obama, “I dread the next four years.”

    This is not a conspiracy of shadowy cigarette-smoking government men out of The X-Files, but it points to a disconcerting groupthink: Just about everybody at the top levels of the FBI, Department of Justice, U.S. national-security agencies, and the Obama administration thought Trump was a corrupt, deranged loon. No doubt Trump earned a lot of that criticism, but that groupthink meant the FBI’s top brass was ready to believe the worst about Trump, no matter the origin.

Around that time, I separately reported that retired FBI agents were . . . less than thrilled to see a former director becoming a hero of “The Resistance” and joking around with Stephen Colbert about the president. Other than Louis Freeh’s tempestuous relationship with Bill Clinton, most retired FBI directors retained nonpartisan reputations and largely stayed out of the spotlight after leaving law enforcement.

But that was then; today, Comey has become indistinguishable from the usual Democratic National Convention speakers. Here’s what happened at a speech he gave last night:

    Former FBI Director James Comey asked American voters Sunday night to end Donald Trump’s presidency with a “landslide” victory for his opponent in 2020.

    “All of us should use every breath we have to make sure the lies stop on January 20, 2021,” Comey told an audience at the 92nd Street Y on New York City’s Upper East Side. He all but begged Democrats to set aside their ideological differences and nominate the person best suited to defeating Trump in an election.

    “I understand the Democrats have important debates now over who their candidate should be,” Comey told MSNBC’s Nicolle Wallace, “but they have to win. They have to win.”

Wait, there’s more — lest you think that Comey is merely a fierce critic of Trump:

    Speaking about the period before the 2016 election, Comey was unsparing of Republican congressional leaders who he said opposed making public intelligence-community concerns over Russian interference.

    “To their everlasting shame, the leaders — (Senate Majority Leader Mitch) McConnell, (House Speaker Paul) Ryan — refused,” Comey said. “I think they’re going to have a hard time explaining that to history.”

Trump’s bad, McConnell’s bad, Ryan’s bad . . . What are the odds that Comey ends up speaking at the 2020 Democratic National Convention?

Is the Federal Bureau of Investigation a partisan institution? No doubt there’s a wide range of opinions throughout the rank-and-file agents and staff, and we certainly all hope that the nation’s premiere law-enforcement agency hasn’t succumbed to partisan groupthink. But the more that Comey sounds like an aspiring DNC chairman, the more he chips away at public faith in the institution.

Who Wants to Be the Next White House Chief of Staff?
Stay Updated with NR Daily

NR's afternoon roundup of the day's best commentary & must-read analysis.

The president, who has made clear that he will not be managed by anyone, is having a hard time finding someone to step into the role of manager.

Trump-administration observers figured that Vice President Pence’s chief of staff, Nick Ayers, would be the next White House chief of staff. But much to everyone’s surprise, he’s not only not taking the job, but he’s leaving the administration entirely.

    Nick Ayers, the main focus of President Trump’s search to replace John F. Kelly as chief of staff in recent weeks, said on Sunday that he was leaving the administration at the end of the year. Mr. Ayers, 36, the chief of staff to Vice President Mike Pence, is returning to Georgia with his wife and three young children, according to people familiar with his plans.

Axios reports that one of the new options to replace John Kelly is . . . the chairman of the House Freedom Caucus?

    Trump has asked confidants what they think about the idea of installing Congressman Mark Meadows, the chairman of the ultra-conservative House Freedom Caucus, as John Kelly’s permanent replacement, according to these three sources. Trump has also mentioned three other candidates besides Meadows, according to a source with direct knowledge. I don’t yet have their names.

If you’re Meadows, do you want that job? You’re the leader of one of the most powerful factions of House Republicans, although you’ll be in the minority starting in January. You represent a district where you won 59 percent in a bad year for Republicans, so you’ll have that job in Congress for as long as you like, as long as you avoid scandal. Trump could serve another six years, or maybe just another two years. And both Reince Priebus and John Kelly seemed perpetually frustrated, aggravated, and exhausted in the job.

And that was during the good times! The next White House chief of staff will be stepping into the eye of a hurricane. The Democrats will run the House and stymie just about any major legislation. (Democrats have spent the past two years telling the country that Trump is an unholy amalgamation of Mussolini, Gordon Gecko, Nero, Caligula, and Beelzebub; they can’t turn around and tell their grassroots supporters, “But we worked out a really great deal on infrastructure with him.”)

At some point presumably soon, special counsel Robert Mueller will submit his final report to the Department of Justice, and it’s likely to paint an ugly portrait contending that  A) the Russian government reached out to figures around Trump, if not Trump himself, and those figures were eager to work with Moscow against Hillary Clinton’s campaign; B) Trump-campaign officials met with Russian intelligence agents throughout 2016; C) Trump conspired with Michael Cohen to send money to Stormy Daniels, which they’ll argue was a campaign-related expense; D) the firing of James Comey amounted to obstruction of justice; E) who knows what about Trump’s past financial ties to Russian entities; F) any financial crimes; and G) God knows what else. One way or another, House Democrats are extremely likely to push for impeachment.

Another figure who appears uninterested in the job . . .

    Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin is one of the advisors to President Donald Trump under consideration to be the next White House chief of staff, according to two people with direct knowledge of the matter.

    Yet Mnuchin has indicated to his inner circle that he feels best served as the head of Treasury, according to these people, who spoke on the condition of anonymity due to the privacy of the ongoing discussions.

Traditionally, the position of White House chief of staff is one of the most desired in Washington, with enormous access to the president and a great deal of behind-the-scenes sway over the president’s schedule, priorities, and communications. Under Trump, there’s little to no ability to sway the president or steer the agenda, and you’re just a scapegoat-in-waiting.

Crafty_Dog

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Shanahan at Sec Def
« Reply #467 on: December 24, 2018, 04:24:38 AM »
« Last Edit: December 24, 2018, 02:00:07 PM by Crafty_Dog »

DougMacG

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Trump Administration, Stephen Moore
« Reply #468 on: May 03, 2019, 05:20:44 AM »
A derogatory article but it explains why he wasn't able to get confirmed to the Fed.  Too bad that he wrote some things offensive and not very funny a couple decades ago.  He would have added pro growth viewpoint to the dual mission Fed.

https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2019/05/how-did-stephen-moore-get-picked-federal-reserve/588502/

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DougMacG

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Trump Administration, Mike Pompeo, Sec State
« Reply #471 on: August 19, 2019, 09:52:12 AM »
https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2019/08/26/mike-pompeo-the-secretary-of-trump

Long article, tells lots of details about Mike Pompeo's life and rise.  Written by Susan Glasser, New Yorker who tries to mix fact reporting with full membership in Trump and Republican Derangement Syndromes.  If you separate out the disparagement, a good story is told here.

Pompeo and Pence, who brought Pompeo into the mix, were both Rubio supporters in the 2016 campaign.
-------------------------
Amid speculation about whether he will run for a Senate seat next year, Pompeo was asked how long he planned to serve at State. “I’m going to be there until he tweets me out of office,”
-------------------------
Glasser tries to paint Pompeo as a Trump yes man who vocally and strenuously disagrees with the President on major issues from time to time.  Pompeo was made rich by the Koch brothers but has the lowest net worth of any member of the cabinet.  It's so hard to keep false narratives alive.

DougMacG

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The Trump Administration, AG Barr fires federal prisons chief
« Reply #472 on: August 20, 2019, 08:37:07 AM »
https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/justice-department/ag-barr-removes-acting-bureau-prisons-chief-wake-epstein-suicide-n1043961
------------------------------------------

Exactly the opposite of Trump's predecessor where you could always ask, who got fired over _____?  The mortgage crisis, fast and furious, IRS targeting, Benghazi, email scandal, and on and on, who got fired?  No one?

As we saw the lapses in security in the facility during this high profile hold and wait for investigation of which middle manager should have done more (investigations are where facts get buried), the top guy got canned.  Incompetence is unacceptable even in government!

Crafty_Dog

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ccp

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Bolton headline today
« Reply #474 on: September 18, 2019, 02:49:11 PM »
sorry he is doing this.
just not good or helpful

something very wrong that we have parades of people doing this
I don't recall this happening in past.

Crafty_Dog

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Re: The Trump Transition/Administration
« Reply #475 on: September 18, 2019, 03:34:25 PM »
Trump can be remarkably graceless towards people he fires.

ccp

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John Kelly
« Reply #476 on: October 26, 2019, 05:35:48 PM »
Very interesting .

I thought Trump fired him.

Maybe he just quit.  I recall my sister saying thank God Kelly is there to keep Trump in line early on:

https://townhall.com/tipsheet/bethbaumann/2019/10/26/john-kelly-i-warned-trump-he-would-be-impeached-if-he-hired-a-yes-man-n2555400

ccp

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Bolton : another new lottery winner who might turn against Trump
« Reply #477 on: November 14, 2019, 05:38:46 AM »
of course this is a leftist bunch of news people

who in past would have trashed Bolton who now hold him up on a pedestal:


https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/donald-trump/private-speech-bolton-suggests-some-trump-s-foreign-policy-decisions-n1080651

The thought that Trump used his hotel interests in Turkey as some part of his determination to throw the Kurds out is not helpful.

So Bolton thinks Iyanka and JayROD would try to convince him to nominate Larry Scribe to the Supreme Court if he should win a second term is way over the top...........That would kill his base........


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Strassel on Barr
« Reply #481 on: January 02, 2020, 07:38:44 PM »
2019’s Adult of the Year
Attorney General William Barr has kept his promises and his independence.

By Kimberley A. Strassel
Jan. 2, 2020 6:50 pm ET

Opinion: Bill Barr's Stand Up Year

Potomac Watch: Columnist Kimberley Strassel names Attorney General Bill Barr her Adult of the Year, for his rare ability to subject his institution to scrutiny, for its own good—and that of the country. Image: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
Person-of-the-year awards are almost always bestowed on men and women who already meet with fawning praise. Let’s instead craft an award based on a person’s willingness to speak truth to power—whether to the press, the boss, or to partisan operators. Call it Adult of the Year. The winner: Attorney General William Barr.

President Trump nominated Mr. Barr in December 2018, and for a moment he received the respect he deserves. The press had grown accustomed to demeaning all Trump nominees, but was stymied by Mr. Barr’s impressive career and bipartisan legal support. A Justice Department and Central Intelligence Agency veteran, he served as attorney general from 1990-91 with distinction. Media outlets had to acknowledge his “pedigree,” and CNN even quoted an unnamed Justice Department lawyer who had been “nervous” about a Trump pick but pronounced Mr. Barr “a great choice” because “he’s tough he’s principled and he’s independent.”

Mr. Barr remains all those things. He has been vilified precisely because he has maintained an impartial view of the Justice Department and has kept his promises. The great hope—and demand—of the Russia-collusion crowd was that Mr. Barr—as a longtime man of the institution—would circle the department’s wagons. His refusal to do so has made him a threat.

And so commenced one of the more obvious, not to mention nasty, delegitimization campaigns in modern Beltway history. Journalists and Democrats accused him of manipulating the rollout of special counsel Robert Mueller’s report in March. They pounced on his decision in May to name U.S. Attorney John Durham to investigate the origins of the Federal Bureau of Investigation probe into the 2016 Trump campaign, accusing both of engaging in “conspiracy theories.”

They were particularly hysterical when Mr. Barr stated that his own view was that Inspector General Michael Horowitz’s December report confirmed that the initial FBI suspicions about Trump-Russia collusion were, as he put it, “insufficient to justify the steps taken.” This is a perfectly valid position for the head of a department to take.

Yet we now find former FBI Director William Webster slamming Mr. Barr for casting unfounded “aspersions” on the FBI, and former Attorney General Eric Holder—who once described himself as President Obama’s “wingman”—declaring Mr. Barr “unfit to lead the Justice Department.”

The attacks are all pointedly designed to cast Mr. Barr as a Trump toady. Yet Mr. Barr wasn’t originally a Trump partisan. He’s 69, isn’t seeking higher office, and left a comfortable private-sector position to take a job he needs like a hole in the head. He testified that he came back because he was in a “position in life” to help “protect the independence and reputation of the department.” He meant its long-term reputation, which won’t recover absent a thorough accounting of its 2016 actions.

Importantly, he also vowed not to “be bullied into doing anything I think is wrong”—including by the White House. Despite all the criticism, not one detractor has yet provided any evidence that Mr. Barr’s decisions or comments have been anything but independent. He vowed to protect Mr. Mueller’s ability to finish his probe, just as he vowed up front to investigate the investigators. Check and check. He likewise pledged to resign if the White House directed him to engage in any illegal action, and there is no reason to believe he’d suffer the abuse Mr. Trump heaped on predecessor Jeff Sessions. Note Mr. Barr’s silence throughout Congress’s impeachment circus; if he’s acting as a personal lawyer to the president, he’s doing a crummy job.

The criticism is even more outrageous given the overwhelming evidence validating Mr. Barr’s concerns. The Horowitz report was the third excoriating former FBI Director James Comey’s tenure—on everything from “insubordinate” to “dangerous” behavior. The inspector general has referred both Mr. Comey and former deputy FBI Director Andrew McCabe for criminal prosecution, the former for leaking and the latter for lying. The latest report also finds the FBI manipulated the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, providing it false information and withholding exculpatory details to spy—yes, spy—on a former Trump campaign adviser.

Beware the claim that it is Mr. Barr’s job to “insulate” the Justice Department and the FBI from “political pressure.” That’s code. What the critics want is for Mr. Barr to insulate those bodies from accountability—and in the process protect all those who allowed their fanatical opposition to a certain candidate to help drag federal law enforcement into dangerous new territory.

The attorney general is, if anything, the rare official able to stand up to both Mr. Trump and the Democratic-media establishment that loathes him. He’s also the rare person willing to subject his institution to scrutiny for its own good—and that of the country. We could use more such adults in the room.

G M

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Re: Strassel on Barr
« Reply #482 on: January 02, 2020, 08:31:58 PM »
All BS unless we see our deep state actors being dragged out of their homes in cuffs by tactical teams.


2019’s Adult of the Year
Attorney General William Barr has kept his promises and his independence.

By Kimberley A. Strassel
Jan. 2, 2020 6:50 pm ET

Opinion: Bill Barr's Stand Up Year

Potomac Watch: Columnist Kimberley Strassel names Attorney General Bill Barr her Adult of the Year, for his rare ability to subject his institution to scrutiny, for its own good—and that of the country. Image: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
Person-of-the-year awards are almost always bestowed on men and women who already meet with fawning praise. Let’s instead craft an award based on a person’s willingness to speak truth to power—whether to the press, the boss, or to partisan operators. Call it Adult of the Year. The winner: Attorney General William Barr.

President Trump nominated Mr. Barr in December 2018, and for a moment he received the respect he deserves. The press had grown accustomed to demeaning all Trump nominees, but was stymied by Mr. Barr’s impressive career and bipartisan legal support. A Justice Department and Central Intelligence Agency veteran, he served as attorney general from 1990-91 with distinction. Media outlets had to acknowledge his “pedigree,” and CNN even quoted an unnamed Justice Department lawyer who had been “nervous” about a Trump pick but pronounced Mr. Barr “a great choice” because “he’s tough he’s principled and he’s independent.”

Mr. Barr remains all those things. He has been vilified precisely because he has maintained an impartial view of the Justice Department and has kept his promises. The great hope—and demand—of the Russia-collusion crowd was that Mr. Barr—as a longtime man of the institution—would circle the department’s wagons. His refusal to do so has made him a threat.

And so commenced one of the more obvious, not to mention nasty, delegitimization campaigns in modern Beltway history. Journalists and Democrats accused him of manipulating the rollout of special counsel Robert Mueller’s report in March. They pounced on his decision in May to name U.S. Attorney John Durham to investigate the origins of the Federal Bureau of Investigation probe into the 2016 Trump campaign, accusing both of engaging in “conspiracy theories.”

They were particularly hysterical when Mr. Barr stated that his own view was that Inspector General Michael Horowitz’s December report confirmed that the initial FBI suspicions about Trump-Russia collusion were, as he put it, “insufficient to justify the steps taken.” This is a perfectly valid position for the head of a department to take.

Yet we now find former FBI Director William Webster slamming Mr. Barr for casting unfounded “aspersions” on the FBI, and former Attorney General Eric Holder—who once described himself as President Obama’s “wingman”—declaring Mr. Barr “unfit to lead the Justice Department.”

The attacks are all pointedly designed to cast Mr. Barr as a Trump toady. Yet Mr. Barr wasn’t originally a Trump partisan. He’s 69, isn’t seeking higher office, and left a comfortable private-sector position to take a job he needs like a hole in the head. He testified that he came back because he was in a “position in life” to help “protect the independence and reputation of the department.” He meant its long-term reputation, which won’t recover absent a thorough accounting of its 2016 actions.

Importantly, he also vowed not to “be bullied into doing anything I think is wrong”—including by the White House. Despite all the criticism, not one detractor has yet provided any evidence that Mr. Barr’s decisions or comments have been anything but independent. He vowed to protect Mr. Mueller’s ability to finish his probe, just as he vowed up front to investigate the investigators. Check and check. He likewise pledged to resign if the White House directed him to engage in any illegal action, and there is no reason to believe he’d suffer the abuse Mr. Trump heaped on predecessor Jeff Sessions. Note Mr. Barr’s silence throughout Congress’s impeachment circus; if he’s acting as a personal lawyer to the president, he’s doing a crummy job.

The criticism is even more outrageous given the overwhelming evidence validating Mr. Barr’s concerns. The Horowitz report was the third excoriating former FBI Director James Comey’s tenure—on everything from “insubordinate” to “dangerous” behavior. The inspector general has referred both Mr. Comey and former deputy FBI Director Andrew McCabe for criminal prosecution, the former for leaking and the latter for lying. The latest report also finds the FBI manipulated the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, providing it false information and withholding exculpatory details to spy—yes, spy—on a former Trump campaign adviser.

Beware the claim that it is Mr. Barr’s job to “insulate” the Justice Department and the FBI from “political pressure.” That’s code. What the critics want is for Mr. Barr to insulate those bodies from accountability—and in the process protect all those who allowed their fanatical opposition to a certain candidate to help drag federal law enforcement into dangerous new territory.

The attorney general is, if anything, the rare official able to stand up to both Mr. Trump and the Democratic-media establishment that loathes him. He’s also the rare person willing to subject his institution to scrutiny for its own good—and that of the country. We could use more such adults in the room.

DougMacG

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Trump Administration, Bolton on Soleimani elimination
« Reply #483 on: January 06, 2020, 11:02:08 AM »
I was going to ask rhetorically how Bolton feels about this...
"Long in the making":  I take that to mean he had a hand in advocating this during his tenure.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
John Bolton
‏Verified account
 
@AmbJohnBolton

Congratulations to all involved in eliminating Qassem Soleimani.  Long in the making, this was a decisive blow against Iran's malign Quds Force activities worldwide.  Hope this is the first step to regime change in Tehran.
2:27 AM - 3 Jan 2020
https://twitter.com/AmbJohnBolton/status/1213044218689720321