Author Topic: President Trump's accomplishments and promises kept  (Read 27023 times)

Crafty_Dog

  • Administrator
  • Power User
  • *****
  • Posts: 49408
    • View Profile



DougMacG

  • Power User
  • ***
  • Posts: 11921
    • View Profile
President Trump's accomplishments: Signs Federal animal cruelty bill into law
« Reply #303 on: December 23, 2019, 07:22:34 AM »
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/11/25/us/politics/trump-animal-cruelty-bill.html
Nov 25, 2019
https://abcnews.go.com/US/video/president-trump-signs-bill-making-animal-cruelty-federal-67315683

Animal rights activists will now be jumping on the Trump bandwagon?

Besides protecting animals, this IMO gives the Feds an earlier shot at some future mass murderers who sometimes let their psychosis show first in cruelty to animals.

DougMacG

  • Power User
  • ***
  • Posts: 11921
    • View Profile
Re: President Trump's accomplishments and promises kept, House passes USMCA
« Reply #304 on: December 23, 2019, 07:29:09 AM »
House passes the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement, one of President Donald Trump’s economic and political priorities, in an overwhelming 385-41 vote. Thirty-eight Democrats opposed it. The trade pact now heads to the Senate, which is expected to ratify it next year.

One more time, that was 385-41.  [Right in the aftermath of impeachment.  I guess they want to be seen in their districts as working with this President on his popular agenda.]

DougMacG

  • Power User
  • ***
  • Posts: 11921
    • View Profile
President Trump's accomplishments and promises kept, good economy
« Reply #305 on: December 24, 2019, 10:46:54 AM »
Almost all Republicans (97%) say economic conditions are good right now, as do 75% of independents and 62% of Democrats.   - Latest CNN poll

Crafty_Dog

  • Administrator
  • Power User
  • *****
  • Posts: 49408
    • View Profile




Crafty_Dog

  • Administrator
  • Power User
  • *****
  • Posts: 49408
    • View Profile
Rank & File Workers Get Bigger Raises
« Reply #310 on: December 28, 2019, 06:20:32 PM »
Rank-and-File Workers Get Bigger Raises
Short supply of labor, minimum-wage rises and increased poaching have helped lift wages for lower-income workers

At Mooyah Burgers, Fries & Shakes, the company president says wages increased 8% in 2019. PHOTO: MOOYAH
By Eric Morath and Jeffrey Sparshott
Dec. 27, 2019 5:30 am ET

Wages for rank-and-file workers are rising at the quickest pace in more than a decade, even faster than for bosses, a sign that the labor market has tightened sufficiently to convey bigger increases to lower-paid employees.

Gains for those workers have accelerated much of this year, a time when the unemployment rate fell to a half-century low. A short supply of workers, increased poaching and minimum-wage increases have helped those nearer to the bottom of the pay scale.

Pay Gap
Median change in hourly wages from a yearearlier
Source: Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta
Note: 12-month moving average
%
RECESSION
Lowest 25%of earners
Highest 25%of earners
2000
’05
’10
’15
’20
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Highest 25%of earnersxMay 2019x3.2%

Pay for the bottom 25% of wage earners rose 4.5% in November from a year earlier, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta. Wages for the top 25% of earners rose 2.9%. Similarly, the Atlanta Fed found wages for low-skilled workers have accelerated since early 2018, and last month matched the pace of high-skill workers for the first time since 2010.

“A strong labor market makes the bargaining power of lower-paid workers more like the labor market higher-wage workers experience during good times and bad,” Nick Bunker, economist with job search site Indeed.com, said.

Labor Department data paint a similar picture. Average hourly earnings for production and nonsupervisory workers in the private sector were up 3.7% in November from a year earlier—stronger than the 3.1% advance for all employees—implying managers and other nonproduction workers saw a 1.6% wage increase in the past year. The department doesn’t produce separate management pay figures.

Nonsupervisory workers earned an average of $23.83 an hour in November according to the Labor Department; managers earned about twice that rate.

Mooyah Burgers, Fries & Shakes, a restaurant chain based in Plano, Texas, with 75 U.S. locations, is among the places that has lifted starting wages to fill positions.

“The effective labor pool is smaller than what it has been in the past,” said Tony Darden, Mooyah’s president. “As you look to bring on folks, ultimately higher wages are used to attract them.”

Wage Gains
Average hourly earnings of private-sectorworkers, change from a year earlier
Source: Labor Department, The Wall Street Journal
Note: Seasonally adjusted, 3-month average;supervisory wages inferred from other available data
%
RECESSION
Production and nonsupervisoryemployees
Supervisory and nonproduction
All
2008
’10
’12
’14
’16
’18
0
1
2
3
4
5
Mooyah is competing for workers with other restaurants, grocery stores, and service providers such as salons. He said the company increased wages 8% in 2019, with much of that flowing to entry-level workers. As a result managers, such as shift supervisors, are seeing less of a premium over their subordinates, Mr. Darden added.

Low-skilled workers are typically the easiest to replace, and thus struggle to command higher wages at most points in the economic cycle. When workers are in short supply, they can benefit more because there may be dozens of nearby opportunities offering slightly more money.

“There’s been more job hopping and firms are having a hard time finding employees,” said Michael Horrigan, president of the W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research. He was previously associate commissioner with the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

While hourly pay for nonmanagers is growing, average hours worked a week have declined this year. Employers may offer higher wages to attract workers but keep hours in check to control labor costs, Mr. Horrigan said.

The labor market for skilled workers is always tighter, but it hasn’t improved as substantially in recent years. The unemployment rate for high school dropouts fell to 5.3% last month from 7.8% three years earlier. The rate for college grads is down to 2% from 2.4% in November 2016, and is slightly elevated relative to the late 1990s and early 2000s.

Skill Difference
Median change in hourly wages from a yearearlier
Source: Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta
Note: 12-month moving average
%
RECESSION
High skill
Low skill
Mid skill
2000
’05
’10
’15
’20
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Higher-paid workers are more likely to have access to perks, including retirement contributions, vacation leave and subsidized child care—benefits in addition to pay that can keep workers from changing jobs. Many lower-paying jobs at retailers and restaurants don’t offer such perks, and workers may jump between those jobs for a few quarters an hour.

Managerial pay appeared to be held back by smaller production bonuses—such as continuing incentives to reach sales targets or deliver on output goals at a factory—said Bank of America economist Alex Lin. The wage figure excluded most benefits and one-time bonuses and stock options.

“Management pay is more sensitive to microcycles in the economy,” he said. “Other workers are more tied to the labor market, which has remained healthy.”

SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS
Have your wages changed in the last year? How so? Join the conversation below.

Another factor supporting the lowest-paid workers is a wave of minimum-wage increases. Twenty-nine states have increased minimum wages above the federal level, and 21 of those will lift the level again in 2020. For example, the minimum wage will increase 12.5% in Washington state, to $13.50 an hour.

“When I heard about that extra $1.50 an hour, I was excited,” said Brian Hoorn of Bellingham, Wash., who earns the minimum wage at Ross Dress for Less. The 28-year-old runs the cash register, aids in fitting rooms and arranges merchandise. He received several pay raises at retail jobs in recent years as the minimum wage rose.

Pay is also increasing for low-skilled work in states such as Georgia, where the minimum wage remains at the federal level of $7.25 an hour.

Eric Watson, owner of an Express Employment Professionals office in Atlanta, said he has advised clients to offer higher wages for warehouse and entry-level manufacturing jobs. The going rate for a warehouse worker in Atlanta is close to $15 an hour, up from $12 two years ago, he said. Some clients raised pay twice in the past year.

“They realize they’re losing their talent to their neighbors,” Mr. Watson said. “Another company will call and offer the worker 50 cents more an hour—and they’ll leave immediately.”

Crafty_Dog

  • Administrator
  • Power User
  • *****
  • Posts: 49408
    • View Profile
$1T repatriated
« Reply #311 on: December 29, 2019, 07:46:37 AM »

DougMacG

  • Power User
  • ***
  • Posts: 11921
    • View Profile
President Trump's accomplishments, Just this year, 2019
« Reply #312 on: December 29, 2019, 02:50:52 PM »
It's a good list if you add the things at the end that didn't make the top ten.  He had a good year - that opponents try to cover up with impeachment.

A whole bunch of different economic accomplishments make up just the first item.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The 10 best things Trump has done in 2019
https://www.timesonline.com/opinion/20191229/10-best-things-trump-has-done-in-2019
by Marc A. Thiessen, The Washington Post
Posted Dec 29, 2019

WASHINGTON — In his third year in office, President Trump continued to deliver an extraordinary list of accomplishments. Today, I offer my annual list of the 10 best things Trump did this year (my next column will list the 10 worst):

10. He continued to deliver for the forgotten Americans. Unemployment is at record lows; this year the number of job openings outnumbered the unemployed workers to fill them by the widest gap ever; wages are rising, and low-wage workers are experiencing the fastest pay increases. Fifty-seven percent of Americans say they are better off financially since Trump took office.

9. He implemented tighter work requirement for food stamps. With unemployment at historic lows, there is no reason more people should not be earning their success through productive work. The rules apply only to able-bodied, childless adults. When we require people to work for public assistance, we not only help meet their material needs but also help them achieve the dignity and pride that come with being a contributing member of our community. Work is a blessing, not a punishment.

8. He has got NATO allies to cough up more money for our collective security. Allies have increased defense spending by $130 billion since 2016. And the White House reports almost twice as many allies are meeting their commitment to spend 2% of gross domestic product on defense today than before Trump arrived.

7. He stood with the people of Hong Kong. He warned China not to use violence to suppress pro-democracy protests and signed the Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act. Hong Kong people marched with American flags and sang our national anthem in gratitude.

6. His withdrawal from the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty is delivering China and North Korea a strategic setback. The United States is now testing new, previously banned intermediate-range missiles. These weapons will allow us to compete with China’s massive investment in these capabilities, and also provide a fallback in the likely case negotiations with North Korea fail — obviating the need for temporary deployments of U.S. carrier battle groups and allowing us to put North Korea permanently in our crosshairs.

5. His “maximum pressure” campaign is crippling Iran. Iran’s economy is contracting, inflation is spiraling and the regime has been forced to cut funding for its terrorist proxies, including Hezbollah and Hamas, the Iranian military and the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC). And now the Iranian people are engaged in the largest popular uprising since the 1979 revolution.

4. His tariff threats forced Mexico to crack down on illegal immigration. Mexico is for the first time in recent history enforcing its own immigration laws — sending thousands of National Guard forces to its southern border to stop caravans of Central American migrants. Plus, Congress is poised to approve the U.S.-Mexico-Canada free-trade agreement, which would not have been possible without the threat of tariffs.

3. He delivered the biggest blow to Planned Parenthood in three decades. Thanks to Trump’s Protect Life Rule that prohibits Title X family planning funds from going to any clinic that performs on-site abortions — Planned Parenthood announced this year that it is leaving the Title X program barring a court victory.

2. He ordered the operation that killed Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi. It was a high-risk mission that required U.S. forces to fly hundreds of miles into terrorist-controlled territory.

1. He has continued to appoint conservative judges at a record pace. The Senate recently confirmed Trump’s 50th pick for the federal circuit courts of appeal, which have final say over about 60,000 cases a year. In three years, Trump has appointed just five fewer circuit court judges than Obama appointed in eight years. And he has flipped three of these courts from liberal to conservative majorities, giving conservatives the majority in seven out of 13.

There are many other significant achievements that did not make the Top 10. Despite an inexcusable 55-day delay, he gave Ukraine the lethal aid that the Obama-Biden administration refused to deliver. He secured the release of additional American citizens held abroad. He launched cyberattacks on Iran, approved a major arms sale to Taiwan, imposed visa restrictions on Chinese officials over Beijing’s oppression of the Uighurs, and refused to make major concessions to North Korea.

DougMacG

  • Power User
  • ***
  • Posts: 11921
    • View Profile

Crafty_Dog

  • Administrator
  • Power User
  • *****
  • Posts: 49408
    • View Profile


DougMacG

  • Power User
  • ***
  • Posts: 11921
    • View Profile
Trump's accomplishments, promises kept, border crossings halted
« Reply #316 on: January 07, 2020, 05:47:15 AM »
The number of families caught crossing illegally went from 84,486 in May to a mere 9,000 in November.

As the El Paso Times put it, “the policy has proved to be a virtual wall.”

https://issuesinsights.com/2020/01/06/trump-is-quietly-winning-bigly-at-the-border/


DougMacG

  • Power User
  • ***
  • Posts: 11921
    • View Profile
Income up in all US metros, 1st time in 26 years
« Reply #318 on: January 14, 2020, 09:18:45 AM »
https://ca.finance.yahoo.com/news/first-time-26-years-u-150735277.html

"First time in 26 years"   - What??  Never happened in the Obama years, when the economy was "already healthy"?

"Americans in every U.S. metropolitan area experienced economic prosperity in 2018, according to a recent report from the Bureau of Economic Analysis."

G M

  • Power User
  • ***
  • Posts: 17340
    • View Profile
Re: Income up in all US metros, 1st time in 26 years
« Reply #319 on: January 14, 2020, 09:36:30 AM »
https://ca.finance.yahoo.com/news/first-time-26-years-u-150735277.html

"First time in 26 years"   - What??  Never happened in the Obama years, when the economy was "already healthy"?

"Americans in every U.S. metropolitan area experienced economic prosperity in 2018, according to a recent report from the Bureau of Economic Analysis."

Not fair. The economy is racist.

DougMacG

  • Power User
  • ***
  • Posts: 11921
    • View Profile
Pres Trump's accomplishments, CPI for prescription drugs
« Reply #320 on: January 16, 2020, 09:55:40 AM »


https://media4.manhattan-institute.org/sites/e21/files/figure1-e21-01132020.png
https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Measuring-Prescription-Drug-Prices-A-Primer-on-the-CPI-Prescription-Drug-Index.pdf
https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/Deregulating-Health-Insurance-Markets-FINAL.pdf

I hope this graph fits on the page.  See the far right side where price plunge.

With the average household spending about $2,700 annually on prescriptions—including the taxes they pay to support government programs purchasing prescriptions—that is an annual savings of $270 per household.
https://caseymulligan.blogspot.com/