Author Topic: DBMA Tactical:  (Read 909 times)

Crafty_Dog

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DBMA Tactical:
« on: October 19, 2017, 11:44:17 PM »
DBMA Tactical Seminar: The Chupacabra Knife Game and Gun-Knife Integration

Featuring yours truly and a mystery gun instructor who must remain anonymous.

WHO: Military and LEO only, active or retired. If this is not you but you are well known to me and there are spaces available, you may be considered.

WHERE

Bay Area, CA.
 Day One: San Rafael (near San Quentin)
 Day Two: Private Gun Range in Point Reyes, Marin County.

HOW MUCH?
 $200 one day
 $300 two days

A first run "Akita" knife from Akita Tactical will be available for inspection.

If you are interested, please email me at craftydog@dogbrothers.com
« Last Edit: February 03, 2020, 03:59:46 PM by Crafty_Dog »

Crafty_Dog

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Re: DBMA Tactical: Gun Knife Integration Seminar November 11-12 Bay area, CA
« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2020, 03:59:29 PM »
Marc:
I would like to compliment you on your recent developments in Close Quarter Combatives With the knife :
First, there is the "The Chupacabra", this is a specialized but very aggressive technique that I believe can be used by both Professionals and Civilians alike. I really like how it requires little training and is ready ”now” when you need it the most in a fight.
Second, there are the knives of your design.  I carry the larger version, the Akita, on my Battle Belt and the smaller version “The Shiba” in my EDC setup. Not only does the handle design, found on both knives, allow for ready access when the fight is already underway, it also makes for a secure grip in high adrenal circumstances.  No fear of sliding down onto the blade when a thrust hits something hard, even when the handle is slippery from blood.
Third, there is your integration of gun and knife for when the gun goes click instead of bang.  This gives a new meaning to a “secondary” weapon system. Not only does the transition to blade allow for ready and rapid lethality, it also enables returning to the gun to bring it back into battery without having to re-sheathe the knife back first. Not having to find the sheath and insert the knife without stabbing yourself during a firefight because you can return the gun to battery without having to re-sheathe the knife can be a real life saver!

Most all other techniques that I have seen tried in the past have this one fatal flaw, of having to take your eyes off the enemy when putting the knife back, yours takes care of that and I do believe the design of the knife itself is key to being able to do the correct and safe technique you taught.

I look forward to learning many more Knife and Stick Fighting techniques from you.

As you say, ”The adventure continues”.
Frankie McRae
Director of Training
910-556-9755 office
910-670-9236 cell
910-893-9887 proshop
www.raidontactics.com
www.37psr.com

Crafty_Dog

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Re: DBMA Tactical:
« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2020, 04:01:51 PM »
Marc:

I wanted to let you know that since we have started working together I have learned a tremendous amount. More so with the adaptation of your fighting (deleted)stance and the flexibility it offers for my Gunfighter series. I have found that it allows for a more mobile base to a more reflexive stance that keeps the shooter from becoming too lazy and moving into a Weaver stance.  Indeed, I think it no less an innovation than the Weaver stance and no less deserving of its own name and hereby propose “the Crafty Dog Stance”. 

Why?

You know how I feel about a restrictive position. The Crafty Dog gives a more powerful position to the shooter to start from  and makes movement easier. It is better for recoil management in a rapid shooting engagement and allows smaller shooters and women to shoot bigger handguns without all the shoulder involvement. It allows for better follow thru and for sure makes recovery easier for faster shooting and quicker target engagement for follow on shots. I just taught a three day Gunfighter course and some of the students had attended a previous course. They loved the new addition and thought it was better adapted to shooting as well. One student said it was more comfortable for him to use the Crafty Dog than a regular Isosceles because it put less stress on his lower back with all the kit on. Anything that helps our backs with 60lbs of body armor and kit  has got to be better than the normal. I wanted to thank you again for the mentoring and the new techniques you have taught me. I hope one day to be able to reciprocate as much. Frankie Mcrae

Director of Training
Raidon Tactics Inc.
37 PSR Gunclub
910-670-9236 cell
910-774-9370 office
Asked why it was dishonorable to return without a shield and not without a helmet, the Spartan king, Demaratos (510 - 491) is said to have replied: "Because the latter they put on for their own protection, but the shield for the common good of all." (Plutarch, Mor.220


www.Raidon Tactics

Frank McRae
Director of Training
He is the former head of the US Army Special Forces Advanced Reconnaissance Target Analysis and Exploitation Techniques Course (SFARTAETC) at Ft. Bragg N.C. He started his military career in the 1st Ranger Bn as an 11B infantryman. He served in the 1st Special Forces Group (ABN) Okinawa Japan, in Cco 1st Bn. 1st SFG(A) (C-1-1) where he was an assault team leader for F team,Troop 1 in the Combatant Commanders In-extremis Force (CIF) conducting operations in Operation Enduring Freedom. Advising, training and standing up the Light Reaction Company of the Armed Forces of the Phillipines (AFP). He was then assigned as an Instructor to the SFARTAETC at the Special Warfare Center and School in Ft. Bragg NC, was promoted and became the NCOIC of the course and awarded for having the highest graduation rate for the course in it's twenty year history . He also served as a Troop SGM Troop 1 and Team SGT ODA-354 in B co 2nd Bn 3rd SFG(A) CIF in IRAQ as an Iraqi Counter-Terrorism Force (ICTF) Company SGM advisor and combat leader on many missions in Iraq and also attended the Israeli Counter-Terrorism Course as an exchange instructor.