Author Topic: The Ukrainian Affairs And Biden-China  (Read 1355 times)

ccp

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Re: The Ukrainian Affairs And Biden-China
« Reply #100 on: October 04, 2019, 02:43:29 PM »
can't paparazzi find out who the whistleblowjobber is?


G M

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Re: The Ukrainian Affairs And Biden-China
« Reply #101 on: October 04, 2019, 05:59:48 PM »
can't paparazzi find out who the whistleblowjobber is?

Yes. But the left always protects it's operatives.



DougMacG

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Ukrainian Affair, interesting if true
« Reply #104 on: October 04, 2019, 07:41:31 PM »
BREAKING: The Democrat whistleblower who complained about Trump digging up dirt in Ukraine was himself helping dig up dirt in Ukraine against Trump (and Manafort) while working in the Obama White House during 2016 campaign.

— Paul Sperry (@paulsperry_) October 4, 2019

The whistleblower was doing what he accused Trump of doing.

https://twitchy.com/samj-3930/2019/10/04/huge-if-true-yup-the-whistleblower-is-a-registered-democrat-but-it-gets-worse-so-much-worse/



Crafty_Dog

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WSJ: Ukes sweated White House Pressure
« Reply #107 on: October 05, 2019, 09:38:27 AM »



In Months Before Trump Call, Ukraine Officials Sweated White House Pressure
The administration in Kyiv felt it had to accede to White House wishes in order to secure a summit


By Alan Cullison,
Georgi Kantchev,
Thomas Grove and
James Marson
Oct. 4, 2019 7:27 pm ET

KYIV, Ukraine—Two weeks after national elections in April vaulted him from the role of television comic to Ukrainian president, Volodymyr Zelensky got word that President Trump’s personal lawyer wanted to come to Kyiv to talk.

Mr. Zelensky and his advisers, many of whom were ex-producers and screenwriters, huddled over the request. Before his improbable rise, Mr. Zelensky didn’t know who Rudy Giuliani was, according to one aide. By now, though, Mr. Zelensky sensed trouble. In an April 7 appearance on Fox News, the former New York City mayor had made it clear he wanted information about his client’s political rival, Joe Biden, and his family.

Mr. Zelensky, fearful of getting sucked into a foreign drama when he had plenty at home, declined to take the meeting.

He got sucked in anyway. Over the next several months, Mr. Zelensky’s administration tried to sort through conflicting signals from Washington that have now become central to an impeachment inquiry into Mr. Trump. A summit dangled by the U.S. leader kept receding. At the last minute, it was announced that Energy Secretary Rick Perry would be attending his inauguration instead of Vice President Mike Pence.

Most worrying, for a country that depends on its strategic alliance with the U.S. to help fend off Russian aggression, the Ukrainians learned long after the fact that Washington had decided to withhold nearly $400 million in approved military assistance.

“This is a damaging mess for Ukraine,” said Pavlo Klimkin, Ukraine’s foreign minister until the end of August. “It has always been a key point of Ukrainian foreign policy to show we have U.S. support. We can’t afford to lose that.”

This account shows how events looked from the Ukrainian side—in particular how the administration in Kyiv felt under pressure to accede to White House’s wishes.

It is based on multiple interviews with current and former Ukrainian government officials; consultants close to members of Mr. Zelensky’s inner circle; current and former U.S. diplomats; and internal documents produced in connection with the U.S. congressional impeachment inquiry.
Mr. Trump’s personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani, seen here in Manchester, N.H., made clear he wanted information about his client’s political rival, Joe Biden, and his family. Photo: jonathan ernst/Reuters

Mr. Zelensky’s difficulties were magnified by his lack of familiarity with U.S. politics. Famous inside Ukraine for his television sitcom role as a history teacher who accidentally becomes president, he was elected by a landslide largely for his distance from a political establishment laboring under a cloud of corruption and self-dealing.

After becoming a front-runner, he took a crash course in civics, getting tutored on the function of institutions like the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, one of the country’s biggest backers, one person close to him said.

For years, Mr. Giuliani and others close to Mr. Trump had blamed Ukraine for bad press during the 2016 U.S. election. They accused the previous Ukrainian administration of Petro Poroshenko of spreading allegations of financial crimes by Mr. Trump’s onetime campaign chief, Paul Manafort, when he worked there as a political consultant.

Before the latest election, Mr. Giuliani met with Ukraine’s top prosecutor, Yuriy Lutsenko, according to a person familiar with the matter. Mr. Lutsenko told Mr. Giuliani he thought there were unanswered questions about the role of the former vice president’s son, Hunter Biden, at Ukrainian gas company Burisma Holdings Ltd., where he had accepted a board seat in 2014, this person said. No allegations of wrongdoing about Hunter Biden have been made public, and Mr. Lutsenko has since said there was no evidence of wrongdoing by Joe Biden or his son.
Mr. Zelensky, seen at his inauguration, was previously famous for his television sitcom role as a history teacher who accidentally becomes president. Photo: sergey dolzhenko/EPA/Shutterstock

Messrs. Trump and Giuliani have alleged that the senior Mr. Biden helped lobby for the ouster of a previous Ukrainian prosecutor to protect his son from an investigation. That prosecutor was dismissed by parliament in the face of a broad criticism by Western countries for not being tough enough on corruption. Mr. Biden has called the accusations against him lies and distortions.

After Mr. Zelensky’s election on April 21, Mr. Giuliani announced his plans to come to Kyiv, press his investigation and meet the new president.

After the new administration demurred, Mr. Giuliani told Fox News in May that the new president had surrounded himself with “a group of people that are enemies of the president…in some cases enemies of the United States.”

Mr. Giuliani took aim in particular at Serhiy Leshchenko, an adviser to Mr. Zelensky who publicized financial documents purported to relate to Mr. Manafort, who was later convicted and jailed for 7½ years on tax and bank fraud, among other crimes. Mr. Leshchenko, a former journalist, said he left Mr. Zelensky’s team to reduce the chance of provoking the ire of Mr. Trump and his allies.

After his election, Mr. Zelensky got a congratulatory phone call from Mr. Trump, who made general reference to the need to fight corruption in Ukraine, without mentioning Mr. Biden or Mr. Giuliani, according to people close to the situation.

There were signs of possible displeasure. Mr. Zelensky’s team was told Mr. Pence would attend his inauguration. Instead, he got Mr. Perry, a cabinet member relatively low in the pecking order.

At the start of his administration, Mr. Zelensky’s administration was eager to clinch a White House summit to show Washington’s support. Mr. Zelensky’s administration was hoping for a quick turnaround, and aides were aiming for a June or July meeting.

“Zelensky was a bit offended; he was asking, ‘Why is it not happening?’” an official close to the situation said.

Before Mr. Zelensky’s inauguration in May, Deputy Assistant Secretary of State George Kent advised members of the incoming team around the president to avoid making Mr. Giuliani any promises, according to people in the U.S. and Ukraine.

Formal diplomatic channels were soon disrupted. Mr. Trump fired the U.S. ambassador in Kyiv, Marie Yovanovitch, whom Mr. Trump would later call “bad news” in a phone call with the Ukrainian president. Mr. Trump ordered her removal after months of complaints from allies outside the administration, including Mr. Giuliani, that she was undermining him abroad and obstructing efforts to persuade Kyiv to investigate the Bidens, The Wall Street Journal has previously reported.
U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch was pushed out after complaints from Trump allies, including Mr. Giuliani. Photo: Mikhail Palinchak/Associated Press

Ms. Yovanovitch didn’t respond to requests for comment. People close to her disputed that she did anything wrong and defended her work.

Kurt Volker, then the U.S. government’s special representative to Ukraine, began laying the groundwork for a longer phone call between Messrs. Trump and Zelensky, where it was clear to participants that Mr. Giuliani’s investigations would be on the agenda.

After having breakfast with Mr. Giuliani in July, Mr. Volker messaged U.S. Ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sondland, another political appointee under Mr. Trump.

“Most impt is for Zelensky to say that he will help investigation—and address any specific personnel issues—if there are any,” Mr. Volker said in the text, which was released this week by Congressional Democrats.

Unbeknown to Mr. Zelensky’s team, a fresh blow had already landed on U.S.-Ukrainian ties. In July, Mr. Trump asked his acting chief of staff, Mick Mulvaney, to place $391 million in aid to Ukraine on hold.

If Washington intended to deliver a message, it didn’t land. Mr. Zelensky had no ambassador in Washington, and other channels of communication had broken down. As they prepared for a promised phone call with Mr. Trump, the Ukrainians were in the dark about one of the most crucial pillars of U.S. support.

On the morning of July 25, hours ahead of the phone call between the U.S. and Ukrainian presidents, Mr. Volker reached out to senior aide Andriy Yermak with advice on how to navigate the call.

“Heard from the White House—assuming President Z convinces Trump he will investigate/”get to the bottom of what happened” in 2016, we will nail down date for visit to Washington,” he wrote.

On the Ukrainian side, advisers weighed in on how to handle the U.S. president. One official suggested Mr. Zelensky tell President Trump that he is draining the swamp in Ukraine, a reference to a popular Trump refrain.

The 40-minute conversation ended with Mr. Zelensky mentioning he stayed “at the Trump Tower” and promising President Trump he would look into the Burisma case and talk to Mr. Giuliani.

When the Ukrainian leader hung up the phone, many of those huddled around him were jubilant. One flashed a thumbs up.

“Phone call went well,” Mr. Yermak texted Mr. Volker, adding that Mr. Trump had asked Mr. Zelensky to choose dates for a White House visit, according to the messages released by Congress. The Ukrainian side responded with Sept. 20-22.
Andriy Yermak, the Zelensky aide who met Mr. Giuliani in Madrid. Photo: nemesh yanosh/EPA/Shutterstock

Little more than a week later, Kyiv followed up on its promise to meet with Mr. Giuliani, sending Mr. Yermak, the Zelensky adviser, to Madrid for a meeting. In an interview, Mr. Giuliani described Mr. Yermak as “very receptive” to their conversation. Mr. Yermak told Mr. Giuliani the Ukrainian president didn’t want to get embroiled in U.S. politics, a person familiar with the conversation said.

Days after the Madrid meeting, Mr. Yermak texted Mr. Volker to say that once a date for a Washington summit was set, the Zelensky administration could announce a “vision for the reboot of US-UKRAINE relationship.” That relationship, he wrote, would include “Burisma and election meddling in investigations.”

The two sides couldn’t agree on the language of an announcement. On Aug. 16, Mr. Yermak shared a draft of a statement on those topics with Mr. Volker, according to Mr. Volker’s testimony to the House released this week. The draft didn’t mention Burisma or the 2016 elections. Mr. Giuliani pushed back, and the U.S. side emphasized the need to include those references. Ultimately, Mr. Yermak rejected it, saying Ukraine didn’t want to be seen as intervening in the 2020 U.S. elections.

When news broke that Mr. Trump had blocked hundreds of millions of dollars in military aid for Ukraine, stunned officials in Kyiv frantically called contacts in the State Department and the Pentagon to learn the reason.

Some Ukrainian officials surmised that there may have been a technical budgetary reason for the holdup. Others thought it could be that the U.S. is halting foreign aid in general. And some thought it was a personal decision of Mr. Trump.
Vice President Mike Pence, center and Mr. Zelensky, left. The Ukrainians had expected Mr. Pence at attend the presidential inauguration. Photo: UKRAINIAN PRESIDENTIAL PRESS SERVICE/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images

The revelations about the July phone call and the release of a rough transcript by the White House caught Mr. Zelensky’s team by surprise. He later said publicly he thought only Mr. Trump’s side of their call would be published.

Earlier this month, while seated next to Mr. Trump during a press conference, Mr. Zelensky said that he didn’t feel pressured by Mr. Trump.

“Only my son, who is 6 years old, can put pressure on me,” Mr. Zelensky said.

With Ukraine now thrust firmly into the middle of a partisan fight in Washington, the Ukrainian president and his team are playing for time. Ukraine’s prosecutor general announced this week it would look at a number of investigations that had been closed under previous administrations, including 15 connected to the owner of Burisma and others. Mr. Biden wasn’t mentioned by name.

The prosecutor stressed that the reviews weren’t connected to political pressure and that the move was part of a broader evaluation of what his predecessors had done in the past.

“Now, they are confused, don’t want to take sides,” said the adviser to Mr. Zelensky’s administration. “They are asking everybody what to do.”

Write to Alan Cullison at alan.cullison@wsj.com, Georgi Kantchev at georgi.kantchev@wsj.com, Thomas Grove at thomas.grove@wsj.com and James Marson at james.marson@wsj.com

Crafty_Dog

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Re: The Ukrainian Affairs And Biden-China
« Reply #108 on: October 05, 2019, 10:18:02 AM »
Not remembering where (sorry) but I heard one report that Zelensky's principal backer (oligarch?) now owns Burisma.  Can we confirm or deny this?


ccp

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Mitch holding strong - so far
« Reply #110 on: October 06, 2019, 01:44:36 PM »

Crafty_Dog

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Re: The Ukrainian Affairs And Biden-China
« Reply #111 on: October 06, 2019, 08:07:19 PM »
Looking for citations of Dems telling Ukes whom not  to prosecute.


ccp

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Crafty_Dog

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Biden-China
« Reply #114 on: October 10, 2019, 04:46:36 PM »

ccp

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Uncle Joe also pain by Burisma
« Reply #115 on: October 10, 2019, 04:54:54 PM »
as well as his son as well as his son's friend

yet when they all golf together just ask about the kids and grandkids....



https://townhall.com/tipsheet/mattvespa/2019/10/10/joe-biden-was-paid-900000-by-burisma-n2554546

But Cuomo's kid will say this proves nothing . 

Crafty_Dog

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Ukrainian parliament member speaks
« Reply #116 on: October 11, 2019, 11:50:08 AM »

Ukraine Will Get the Truth on Corruption
Our alliance with the U.S. depends on answering questions about the Bidens and election interference.
By Valentyn Nalyvaichenko
Oct. 10, 2019 6:19 pm ET
The building of the prosecutor general in Kyiv, Ukraine, Oct. 4. Photo: Str/Zuma Press

The U.S. and Ukraine are wrapped together in a crisis, and the future of our partnership depends on us finally getting to the facts. As a member of the Ukrainian Parliament, one of my country’s foremost national security experts, and a leader of our fight against corruption, I know discovering the truth is the first step toward any acceptable resolution.

Serious allegations have been made in the U.S. and Ukraine, including that Ukrainian government officials and organizations assisted Hillary Clinton’s campaign in 2016 and that Burisma, a major Ukrainian gas company, hired Hunter Biden, Joe Biden’s son, for cynical purposes. Regardless of the implications of these charges within American politics, Ukraine has a responsibility to investigate them completely and transparently.
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First, as I have insisted for more than two years, we must resolve the allegation that Ukrainian officials interfered in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. If we find that Ukrainian laws were broken, the perpetrators here must be prosecuted swiftly, to the fullest extent of the law.

Second, Ukraine must resolve the allegations regarding Burisma. As the former head of the Security Service of Ukraine, our version of the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation, I know there are many accusations of corruption against this company.

It isn’t clear whether Ukrainian officials meddled in the American election, but Parliament must find out. We also do not know if Hunter Biden was complicit in Burisma’s alleged corruption, or why he was appointed to the board of a Ukrainian company. The allegation that Burisma arranged its relationship to the younger Mr. Biden by donating to a U.S. think tank is merely a small part of the larger question about its activities.

There is no way to know if crimes were committed unless the Ukrainian government investigates all allegations properly and transparently. It is imperative for our country and our place in global society that corruption at the top is dealt with seriously, with no one placed above the law.

That is why I am proposing that all parties in the new Ukrainian Parliament, which took office a month ago, join in an investigation to discover exactly what took place with Burisma and the 2016 U.S. elections.

In Ukraine, members of our national parliament, the Verkhovna Rada, are obliged to pursue the truth vigorously in these matters. There must be no diplomatic hangover from corruption crimes committed before the current government was seated. After all, the old government is long gone.

Since we won our freedom in 1991, Ukraine has worked closely with the U.S. to develop a world-class democracy. With Western support we have come a very long way. We have further to go, and one of the steps we must take is to prove we are trusted partners in the global fight against corruption.

When crimes are committed, it is vital that the criminals are brought to justice. We must act.

Only when our two great nations recognize the necessity for strategic partnership and work together in pursuit of justice can we assure that this never happens again.

Mr. Nalyvaichenko is a member of the Ukrainian Parliament. He served as head of the Security Service of Ukraine from 2006-10 and 2014-15.

Crafty_Dog

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Judicial Watch vs. CFIUS
« Reply #117 on: October 12, 2019, 01:26:27 AM »
Why does Judicial Watch have to go to court to get this info?
=============

Tom Fitton: JW Files Lawsuits on Biden Ukraine-China Scandal; JW Battles in Court to Question Clinton; Trump Boots China From U.S. Port

Judicial Watch Files Two More Lawsuits on Biden Ukraine-China Scandal

Our government doesn’t assume that every business investment opportunity is good for our country, and so there are checks in place, including something called the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS). CFIUS is commissioned to review “transactions involving foreign investment in the U.S. to determine the effect of such transactions on the national security of the United States.”

What does CFIUS know about Hunter Biden’s questionable overseas ventures? The agency is playing its cards close to the vest. So we are suing the State and Treasury Departments for information on CFIUS’ handling of investments in the U.S. by two companies tied to Joe Biden’s son, Hunter Biden. The companies are Ukraine’s Burisma Holdings and China’s Bohai Harvest RST (BHR).

We sued in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia after the departments failed to respond to June 24, 2019, FOIA requests for CFIUS records related to investments by the Ukrainian company Burisma Holdings LTD or any of its affiliated entities and records related to investments by the Chinese company Bohai Harvest RST or any of its affiliated entities (Judicial Watch v. U.S. Department of State (No. 1:19-cv-02960)), (Judicial Watch v. U.S. Department of the Treasury (No. 1:19-cv-02961).

Hunter Biden, son of former Vice President Joe Biden, is reported to be one of nine directors of BHR Partners, which was registered 12 days after the vice president’s son, in December 2013, flew to Beijing aboard Air Force Two, while his father made an official visit as vice president. Hunter Biden, then-chairman of the private equity firm Rosemont Seneca, reportedly signed a deal with the Chinese government-owned Bank of China to set up the BHR $1 billion joint venture investment fund.

In 2015, BHR Partners participated in a $600 million buyout of Michigan automotive-suspension-systems maker Henniges Automotive. Henniges produces anti-vibration technologies which have important military uses, particularly in military aircraft.

In April 2014, Hunter Biden joined the board of Burisma Holdings, one of the Ukraine’s largest natural gas companies. Hunter was reportedly paid $50,000 a month to, in the words of a Burmisa news release, “provide support for the Company among international organizations." Biden has denied that was his role.

In 2015, Viktor Shokin, Ukraine’s prosecutor general, launched an investigation into allegedly corrupt practices by Burisma. Shokin was ousted in 2016. And in a widely distributed 2018 video, Joe Biden confirmed that he had successfully pressured the Ukrainian government, under threat of withholding $1 billion in U.S. government aid, to fire Shokin. (In September, we sued the State Department for records about the firing of Ukraine’s top prosecutor after then-Vice President Joe Biden threatened to withhold aid.)

The Commerce Department recently barred over two dozen Chinese companies from doing business in the U.S., one of which is reported to be Megvii Technology, an artificial intelligence company focused on developing facial recognition technology. BHR Partners owns a stake in Megvii.

Have no doubt: We will continue to press for information to get to the bottom of this influence-peddling scandal involving Joe Biden and his son. As Congress is obsessed with attacking President Trump, it is again up to us to do the basic investigative work on this growing scandal.

DougMacG

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Brokaw questions Biden 2008
« Reply #118 on: October 12, 2019, 07:14:53 AM »
https://www.newsweek.com/video-joe-hunter-biden-corruption-resurfaces-1464726

This video has been circulating the last couple of days.  I couldn't figure why a lefty anchor was being so tough on Biden.  Only one possible answer.  He was doing the work of another Democrat candidate.  Most likely Hillary Clinton was trying to clear the field, fed a corruption question on her opponent to the media.  How ironic.  And now it helps Trump.
« Last Edit: October 12, 2019, 08:16:43 AM by DougMacG »

Crafty_Dog

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DougMacG

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Re: Contray to our narrative
« Reply #120 on: October 12, 2019, 01:18:00 PM »
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/12/opinion/sunday/ukraine-trump.html?smid=nytcore-ios-share

"But if you believe Giuliani, the black ledger was part of a plot to damage Trump."

   - No one is asked to believe Rudy.  He is giving a heads up of reports coming. Take with grain of salt but I would add, his record of accuracy and honesty is better than hers *.

"This addled, through-the-looking glass fantasy came to drive American foreign policy in Ukraine. Trump withdrew the American ambassador to the country, Marie Yovanovitch, whom reformers saw as their champion."

   - Switching ambassadors alone is a non-event, and which people are the "reformers"?  If the let-go ambassador knows something relevant, speak up, but her story is that she doesn't accept that she served at the pleasure of the President even though it was in her contract.

"He withheld military aid that Ukraine desperately needed, while asking Zelensky to do him a “favor” and investigate deranged fictions about Ukrainian interference in American elections."

   - Goldberg ties these events together.  That doesn't make them tied together.  Reuters reported aid was held up related to the Chinese purchase of a Ukraine company and others reported the President of Ukraine didn't know aid was held up.  Hardly quid pro quo.  She says fiction on the interference charge.  We don't know about that.  Sounds like someone is desperate to set their own narrative before facts come out.

"...as well as Joe Biden and his son, Hunter."

   - These are the most visible and influential people caught up in the corruption.  Does the author think it should not be investigated if the names were Mike Pence and son or Donald Trump and son?

"...defamed by powerful forces in the United States, once the world’s strongest backer of those fighting for democracy in his country."

   - Umm, the US was a not "the world's stronger backer of those fighting for democracy in his country" under Trump's predecessor when Crimea was taken.

"Here in Ukraine, a country locked in a proxy war with Russia, coping with a deluge of disinformation and propaganda and struggling to transcend a history of corruption, reformers are trying to figure out what it means when the American president sides against them."

   - Mentioned above, they did not have a US ally before Trump.

I think if you check the email and phone log and you will find Biden campaign fingerprints on this misdirection play.  We already know that's how they plant stories and narratives.

I have plenty of time to wait for facts to come out and am happy to have Mike Pence assume the Presidency is Donald Trump is caught committing high crimes and misdemeanors.  So far no crime by Trump - or she wouldn't be writing about a change of Ambassadors in the Ukraine.
--------------------------

*  Same author, pre-Mueller report Jan 19 2018:
"Is this the collusion we are waiting for?" 
[Attn NYT: The rest of us aren't waiting for any collusion.]
"..one of those episodes that is easy to lose track of amid the avalanche of evidence connecting the Trump administration and Russia."
[Ooops, no "avalanche".
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/19/opinion/nra-russia-investigation-trump.html



Crafty_Dog

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