Author Topic: DB and DBMA in the media  (Read 95725 times)



Crafty_Dog

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Crafty_Dog

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First episode of Why We Fight
« Reply #104 on: October 25, 2017, 11:14:15 AM »

https://www.go90.com/shows/1F1A4hP13BG

Our episode will be released in mid-November.

Crafty_Dog

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Jocko and friend discuss the Dog Brothers!!!
« Reply #105 on: November 29, 2017, 10:48:30 PM »
I am having a major fan boy moment!

At 1:01:30 et seq.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7GNRn3GtJ3g&app=desktop

PS:  The Stinky Stick technique was me!

DougMacG

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Re: Jocko and friend discuss the Dog Brothers!!!
« Reply #106 on: November 30, 2017, 09:46:37 AM »
I am having a major fan boy moment!

At 1:01:30 et seq.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7GNRn3GtJ3g&app=desktop

PS:  The Stinky Stick technique was me!

I will not be fighting Crafty at the next Gathering!

Crafty_Dog

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Running towards the guns
« Reply #107 on: March 05, 2018, 05:37:53 AM »


Co-author Matt Larsen founded the Army's Modern Army Combatives Program which, under his leadership, included Real Contact Stick Fighting.  I was a subject matter expert forth is portion of the program and made a Level III instructor in MACP.




https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/posteverything/wp/2018/03/05/a-gun-wont-give-you-the-guts-to-run-toward-danger/?utm_term=.35c6c8d3dab0



Crafty_Dog

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Podcast 8/10/18
« Reply #108 on: August 09, 2018, 06:26:43 PM »

Crafty_Dog

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DougMacG

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DougMacG

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Re: Crafty Dog podcast
« Reply #112 on: November 03, 2019, 11:40:05 AM »
https://anchor.fm/nicholaspaularnold/episodes/Episode-13-Interview-wPunong-Guro-Marc-Crafty-Dog-Denny-of-Dog-Brothers-Martial-Arts-e8jekh

Very well done, great stuff!

I got some echo from the interviewer at times; I wonder why.  Your voice comes through well. 

The interviewer slows the flow at times though nice to reach his audience.

Would like to see you do your own podcast or video on political, economic or foreign policy issues, blending it with wisdom learned through martial arts.

Crafty_Dog

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Re: DB and DBMA in the media
« Reply #113 on: November 03, 2019, 08:25:48 PM »
Thank you very much.

Yeah there are some random tech glitches here or there.

Hope I wasn't to blunt with the guy ("It's a yes or a no question"  :roll: ) he was very nice.

I like the idea of doing a semi-regular podcast.  Would you like to be the interviewer?

DougMacG

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Re: DB and DBMA in the media
« Reply #114 on: November 04, 2019, 06:17:15 AM »
"Hope I wasn't to blunt with the guy ("It's a yes or a no question"  :roll: ) he was very nice."

A couple of times yes, but he was seeking clarity and got it.   )

"I like the idea of doing a semi-regular podcast.  Would you like to be the interviewer?"

Yes.  I don't know if I would be good at it but I think we would know if it could work part way through the first try.

I couldn't go into as blindly as he did.  I would need to know in advance an idea of where you want the questions to lead, even though the best parts will no doubt be where it goes off-script.

Crafty_Dog

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Re: DB and DBMA in the media
« Reply #115 on: November 04, 2019, 08:22:19 AM »
Is something the technology aspect of which you could handle? Maybe with Webmaster Bob as your advisor?


DougMacG

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Re: DB and DBMA in the media
« Reply #116 on: November 04, 2019, 01:39:53 PM »
Is something the technology aspect of which you could handle? Maybe with Webmaster Bob as your advisor?

I was going to ask what kind of equipment you were using.  As a first step I looked up best podcast microphone and ordered a USB unit today to work with my computer.

Crafty_Dog

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DBMA Guro Splinter Dog Antone Haley
« Reply #117 on: January 20, 2020, 10:46:22 PM »
« Last Edit: January 22, 2020, 09:07:02 AM by Crafty_Dog »

Crafty_Dog

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DBMA in Russian Budo
« Reply #119 on: February 03, 2021, 02:22:24 PM »

Crafty_Dog

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The Forgotten Story of the UFC's Flirtation with Stick Fighting
« Reply #120 on: February 20, 2021, 12:15:44 PM »
The forgotten story of UFC’s flirtation with stick fighting – The Athletic

‘Too extreme’: The forgotten story of the UFC’s flirtation with stick fighting
Shaheen Al-Shatti Feb 18, 2021 9

It’s often said that nothing was off-limits in the early days of MMA. And though that’s not entirely true, it’s not far off the mark either. With the UFC all too happy to poke the edges of polite society in its No Holds Barred years if it helped attract a few extra eyeballs, its metaphorical head was always on a swivel in search of the next great controversy or idea. And one of the wildest examples — one that’s been lost to history — was a proposal that floated across the promotion’s desk in 1995.


The UFC had already held a handful of successful pay-per-views by the end of 1994, the last of which — UFC 4 — featured a bout that perfectly embodied the lawless ethos of a fledgling sport. The image of Keith Hackney, a blue-collar air conditioning technician out of the Midwest, raining down a hurricane of blows upon the family jewels of Joe Son, one of the era’s many charlatans who represented his own fictional style called Jo Son Do, was peak No Holds Barred.


The popularity of those first shows coaxed a wave of martial arts oddities out of the woodwork, with many fighters representing their own obscure disciplines, and all of them seeking validation in the UFC’s tournaments. But one group’s aspirations rose higher than just competing: the Dog Brothers.


The brainchild of a trio of well-to-do friends out of Southern California, the Dog Brothers extolled a self-styled, weapon-based martial art that was essentially a loose combination of the Japanese discipline of kendo and the Philippine discipline of escrima, both of which focused on combat with wooden sticks.
All three creators went by elaborate nicknames — “Crafty Dog” Marc Denny, “The Guiding Force of the Dog Brothers”; “Top Dog” Eric Knaus, “The Fighting Force of the Dog Brothers”; and “Salty Dog” Arlan Sanford, “The Silent Force of the Dog Brothers” — as did their disciples. Matches were brutal and protective equipment was sparse. Their mission statement was a simple one — and they were all-in on their canine aesthetic.


“These guys were doing full-on stick fighting,” remembers UFC co-founder Campbell McLaren.
“They had this crest, and it was two dogs standing up fighting with sticks. Not real — like, cartoon dogs fighting with the escrima sticks. And then their motto was: ‘No suing.’”


The latter point was an important one. The UFC had burst into the public consciousness in part because of its willingness to embrace violence, but the Dog Brothers had raised the bar in that regard.


“They were white-collar guys and they would beat the fuck out of each other,” remembers UFC co-creator Art Davie. “Just beat the fuck out of each other with these sticks. They were still wearing like a (fencing) mask or a goalie’s face mask, and they were wearing some sort of gloves, but it wasn’t a big deal.


“They would wind up with fucked up knuckles or somebody would get a broken finger. And that’s how these things would end. Somebody would either signal defeat — very rarely — or they would get injured. They would get injured, and that’s what I found fascinating.”


A lawyer who continued competing in stick fighting until his late 40s, Denny insisted on his combatants “self-governing” their own matches, “without relying upon a referee.”


“No judges, no referees, no trophies,” Denny says.


“We’ve certainly had some concussions and plenty of broken bones. One guy had a split kneecap. So it’s serious, it’s rowdy.”


The outlaw tenor of the era fit the two groups to a tee. Believing to have found a kindred corporate spirit, the Dog Brothers broached conversations with the UFC in early 1995 with a proposition: Bring us on as mid-card programming between tournament bouts and we’ll not only kill the dead air on a pay-per-view, we’ll also show your audience a spectacle unlike any they’ve seen before.


And there was mutual interest, at least initially.


Davie attended two different Dog Brothers demonstrations — afternoons in Huntington Beach that were styled as “Gatherings of the Dog Pack,” which ended up being half kumite, half friendly neighborhood barbecue.


He came away genuinely intrigued by what he saw.


“There was Buck Dog, Spit Dog — everybody was a dog,” Davie says. “And it was funny because they were educated. These were not a bunch of yahoos from some corner of Los Angeles that you would’ve said, ‘Well, you know, it’s logical that they would have gotten (into this).’ … And they would just beat the frick out of each other, then they’d all barbecue chicken and hamburgers and we’d sit around and eat.


“One of the things I found once we did the first UFC is that there was a universe of people out there that was available. That was the beauty of the martial arts, is that every city had you-name-it. So there were people out there that we’d never heard of, and the universe was full of people in those days who were absolutely off the wall — and to me the Dog Brothers were just another wonderful, crazy group of guys who had gotten into these exotic martial arts and pursued them. So it was fascinating. I thought they were very legitimate, and I felt that the demonstrations I saw would have fascinated our audience.”


McLaren was equally smitten. The weaponry used at “Gatherings of the Dog Pack” wasn’t only limited to wooden sticks. From the traditional — whips, practice knives, triple staffs — to the outlandish such as hockey sticks, frying pans, and other household objects, any weapon was fair game as long as it was mutually agreed upon before a match.


The UFC had already done interstitial programming in the past, often in the form of an award presentation to a martial arts luminary, so it wasn’t a foreign proposition as far as pay-per-view resources. But McLaren also courted bombast as gleefully as Davie did, and in the Dog Brothers, he saw an untapped market that could turn into more than just a halftime show.


“The moment they start hitting each other and jumping around, the mask would come flying off. And I’m looking at this and I’m going, ‘This is the coolest stuff I’ve ever seen,’” McLaren said.


“They’re like proto-bros, right? ‘Bro, come on. We can do some stick fighting, bro. Come do it, bro. Come on.’ And then they beat the shit out of each other. And they’re like bamboo sticks, so there’s probably some concussions involved, but mostly it’s like scalp cuts, so it’s just a lot of blood. And I’m looking at this — I go, ‘this is fucking awesome.’ I mean, we need to do one of these fights in between fights and see if we could spin this off. Full-contact stick fighting.”


Unfortunately, or perhaps fortunately depending on your opinion of grown men beating the living bejesus out of each other with wooden sticks, the temperature around UFC had already begun to rise by the time the Dog Brothers entered the picture. Pressure from media and politicians, both on the state and federal level, to shut down the sport was creeping through the front door of the UFC’s party in a way that felt soberingly real, and the infamous “human cockfighting” remarks of U.S. Sen. John McCain were lurking around the corner.


As early as 1994 at UFC 3, local law enforcement had already begun threatening to arrest athletes on assault charges if the promotion’s events proceeded as planned. As much as MMA thrived on controversy, it was becoming clear to all involved how dire the situation could get if they didn’t draw a line in the sand.
“We had a CFO that sometimes he’d literally pass out from stuff I would show him, so I brought him in, because he was kind of the litmus test. If he passed out, I knew it was good. And he passed out (watching the stick fighting), so I figured it was good,” McLaren says.


“But everybody just went, ‘No, you’re out of your mind. Are you kidding? We’re in trouble and it’s guys punching each other, and you want to bring in full-contact stick fighting?!’ And you’re laughing and I’m laughing as I tell this, but when I did it, it was like, ‘Oh, hell no, Campbell. No. And in fact — you should probably leave.’ It wasn’t even (a discussion). And I’m like, ‘Ah, come on! An exhibition? No suing!’ But that was that. It was enough.”


As bizarre as its brief lifespan may have been, the UFC’s flirtation with full-contact stick fighting died a swift death. In May 1995, Davie penned a wistful rejection letter to the Dog Brothers in which he wrote, “it is with great reluctance that I must tell you that stickfighting, such as your group has pioneered in the USA, is just too extreme for the UFC format at this time.”


The phrase “too extreme for the UFC” served as its own badge of honor in 1995 — “We’re proud of that one,” Denny says, laughing — but the matter was settled.


And so the sport moved on. Davie sold his share of the UFC by the end of 1995 and McLaren was pushed out of the picture soon after. MMA ultimately exploded in popularity over the ensuing decades, culminating in the UFC’s sale to WME-IMG in 2016 for a then record-breaking sum of over $4 billion. And the Dog Brothers even played their own small roles in the ecosystem.


Denny, one of the group’s founders, served as a judge for a single fight at UFC 10. His fellow stick-fighting apostle, Lester Griffin — aka “Surf Dog” — followed a similar path and judged myriad high-profile MMA events from 2006-16, counting the UFC, Bellator, Strikeforce, WEC and Invicta FC among his credits.
The Dog Brothers pressed on as well — their YouTube channel continues to upload content to this day, and their website still proudly displays Davie’s letter.


“If I could’ve made the decision unilaterally,” Davie says 26 years later, “especially me — the spectacle guy — I would have put them in.”


Who knows what could’ve been?


The UFC’s dalliance with stick fighting is now a lost footnote in history, but perhaps an alternate universe exists somewhere out there in the cosmos where the Dog Brothers reached out with their proposition before the deluge of outside pressure devoured the early UFC whole. Perhaps their weaponized mid-card exhibitions became a smash hit in that universe, and full-contact stick fighting turned into the spinoff McLaren always envisioned, a bastard cousin to the UFC’s original offering that spawned thousands of Dog Brothers gyms and “Gatherings of the Dog Pack” around the globe.


Probably not. But hey, anything was possible in those Wild West days.


(Photo of Art Jimmerson and Royce Gracie: Markus Boes)