Footwork

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8 thoughts on “Footwork”

  1. I like the explosive nature of these movements.
    Tried it during one of our sparring session and it can be quite disruptive and unsettling on your opponent.

    • Agreed! Have not used Krabi Kabong in sparring yet, but being able to go from 3 foot engagement range to 9+ is startling. ESPECIALLY for the no foot work people. I’m a huge fattie and even I learned to throw my weight into a good 9 foot+ coverage. It’s just….. real world sh*t Lol to cover distance to kill the enemy.

  2. Note something else: We can

    a) step with the same side foot e.g. the boxing jab. Done in repetition this becomes KK/skipping.

    b) step with the opposite foot (DBMA’s Zirconia). Done in repetition this becomes walking/running.

    Transitioning fluidly between the two is a highly valuable fighting skill.

  3. Both techniques make good sense.

    Would there be a reason to use one movement over the other?

    Hop vs, step and shuffle?

    I could see the hop adding power to the store with the weight transfer.

  4. “Would there be a reason to use one movement over the other? Hop vs, step and shuffle?
    I could see the hop adding power to the store with the weight transfer.”

    You have keyed in on something very important. In DBMA an easy terminology we use is:

    a1) Same Hand & Foot e.g. a boxing jab is a Short Step with the Same Foot.
    a2) Skipping can be considered a form of SH&F but because it also Long Steps (foot that was behind steps all the way forward) it has a different quality.

    b) Opposite Hand & Foot e.g. throwing the ball, all strikes delivered in this manner. O

    Each has its place and purpose!

    Fluidity in transitioning between the these is of great fighting value for when we change our idiom of movement if we know what we are about we can accomplish good things.

  5. “I love that side-step with the forehand shot. He delivers so much power with it.”

    Muay Thai is the combat ring sport of the Thai military weaponry system of Krabi Krabong.

    Someone who knows one will find the other quite intuitive.

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